Gigabyte joins the gaming laptop party with its P57 series

You've read the headline, and you're probably expecting to see a black monolith with weird angles and liberal use of red trim. Gigabyte's P57 gaming laptops mercifully don't follow that boring old route, though. The P57 series machines have an understated black aesthetic with a bit of orange trim that doesn't scream "720 noscope" from a mile away.

Understated externals say nothing about the machine's innards, though, and the P57's internals don't disappoint in the least. It's powered by an Intel Core i7-6700HQ CPU, a four-core, eight-thread unit with 2.6GHz base and 3.5GHz turbo clocks. Graphics horsepower comes by way of GeForce GTX graphics cards—a GTX 970M with 3GB of VRAM on the higher-end P57W model, and a GTX 965M with 2GB on the P57K.

RAM capacity goes up to 16GB, while a PCIe NVMe SSD as large as 512GB handles storage duties. Users can add up to two additional 2.5" HDDs—one goes in its own dedicated space in the laptop's main body, while the optical disc drive can be removed to make room for the second. Gigabyte has a Blu-ray burner available as an option, too.

The P57's display is a 1080p IPS LCD, which should provide decent color reproduction. However, there's no word on refresh rates above 60Hz or variable-refresh-rate support. The keyboard is backlit and has 30-key rollover, a good thing for playing MOBAs and MMORPGs with complicated keystroke sequences.

Peripheral connectivity  comes by way of three USB 3.0 ports, a USB 3.1 Type-C connector, and Bluetooth 4.1 support. The standard video outputs are present, too: HDMI 2.0, miniDP, and the undying VGA port. Networking is handled by 802.11ac Wi-Fi and Gigabit Ethernet adapters.

The whole machine measures 16.6" by 11.4" by 1" (or 421mm x 290mm x 25mm) and weighs in at 6.4 lbs (2.9 kg). There's no exact word on availability, but Newegg already has a product page up for the P57W with 8GB of RAM and 128GB for $1,499. The online retailer also offers a version with 16GB of RAM and a 256GB SSD for $1,699.

Comments closed
    • Chrispy_
    • 4 years ago

    Ugh, optical bay eating space for a bigger battery, or (in the case of most serious gaming laptops) bigger cooling for quieter fans and probably space for a subwoofer too.

    I wouldn’t moan about it in a 17.3″ model usually as there’s space for it, but the predecessor to this, the P37 was way way [i<]way[/i<] too noisy. Other vendors (Dell, Asus, MSI, Clevo) are using the extra space freed up by an optical bay to add more heatpipes, more fans and more cooling vents, for a gaming laptop that's pretty much a no-brainer.

      • burntham77
      • 4 years ago

      Kudos to any laptop maker that puts value on low noise. I have a last-gen Asus ROG laptop and it’s nice and quiet. I love it. I cannot imagine owning a laptop that sounds like a leafblower.

    • UberGerbil
    • 4 years ago

    This thing is about the same size and weight at the top-of-the-line Dell I got almost exactly 20 years ago. That thing also had two bays that accepted an optical (CD-ROM) drive + floppy combo(!) or a battery, so you could have “three spindles” (counting the HD) or three batteries in it. I think I got about 6 hours of battery life. Oh, yeah: 1024×768 24bit screen, Pentium 166 (w/MMX!), 4MB of RAM, and a 4GB HD (IIRC; I had another HD I could swap in with NT 4.0 on it but I think that one was only 2GB).

      • Laykun
      • 4 years ago

      Just waiting on the point.

        • UberGerbil
        • 4 years ago

        It’s a Cool Story, Bro. 😉 The size and weight just prompted me to take stock of how far we’ve come in exactly 20 years.

    • Fonbu
    • 4 years ago

    Maybe a dB spec should be given with these gaming laptops? Its just a thought for manufacturers to give someone an idea of how loud it will sound when at load.

      • EzioAs
      • 4 years ago

      Probably not a good idea since it won’t be useful to compare them with different laptops from different manufacturers. It’s best to just let reviewers test them.

        • Fonbu
        • 4 years ago

        That is plausible. Also it could be the manufacturers do not really want the consumer to know how loud it gets because it could turn them away in the end.

        • Welch
        • 4 years ago

        Uhhh why? I get that you just made a statement that its best to leave it to reviewers but WHY? A dB rating from X number of feet away or different distances isn’t a bad idea. Afterall speakers and headphones are accompanied by these ratings to give the listener an idea of what to expect.

          • EzioAs
          • 4 years ago

          Because laptop manufacturers would definitely want to…I’ll just say it, lie or be dishonest to have a better impressions from potential buyers. Plus, we can’t expect every manufacturers would use the same equipment, same tests and have the same environment as other manufacturers AND customers hence giving dB spec would be almost entirely useless. That’s why I said it wouldn’t be a good idea.

      • Airmantharp
      • 4 years ago

      My P170EM is certainly loud, and it’s the same performance class as this guy (assume Gigabyte will be making a 17″ version at some point).

      Just hard to put desktop-class hardware in such a small and flat space and cool it efficiently and quietly, though you can certainly cool it well enough!

      • chµck
      • 4 years ago

      dB and frequency tbh.

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