Fallout 4 mod support arrives on the PC in April

Fallout 4 players, rejoice. In an interview with GameInformer, Bethesda's Todd Howard revealed that official mod support for Fallout 4 is coming in April.

Until now, players looking to add features to Fallout 4 or make it suit their style a little better have had their work cut out for them. First, they needed to hit a site like the venerable NexusMods. They then had to use a third-party mod manager or do the dirty installation work on their own, with varying degrees of success. Integrating Fallout 4 with the Steam Workshop would make things a lot easier for everyone involved, as happened with Skyrim. There's yet no official word as of yet, though, so it's still possible (but unlikely) that Bethesda will restrict mod delivery to their own store.

Bethesda previously said that consoles would also get mod support, and now Howard has established an accurate timeline for when that will happen. He unsurprisingly says it's "far easier to update and iterate on PC," so it makes sense that plaform will get mod support first, after the first piece of DLC for Fallout 4 hits the market. Mod support for the Xbox One should follow roughly a month afterwards, and PlayStation 4 support is expected to come another month after that.

Now, carry on. Preston Garvey needs you to help another settlement.

UPDATE 2/24/16, 5:35 PM: edited to note there's yet no official word on Steam Workshop support.

Comments closed
    • brucethemoose
    • 4 years ago

    [quote<] First, they needed to hit a site like the venerable NexusMods. They then had to use a third-party mod manager or do the dirty installation work on their own, with varying degrees of success. Integrating Fallout 4 with the Steam Workshop would make things a lot easier for everyone involved, as happened with Skyrim. [/quote<] Depends how much modding you actually want to do. If you're just installing fun mods that, say, turn Alduin into Thomas the Tank Engine, the Workshop is fine... As long as you don't use too many mods. But things fall apart very quickly as you pile more workshop mods on top, which one reason why many major mods never transitioned there. The way I see it, there are 3 levels of modding in Skyrim: [list<] [*<] Simple modding with the Steam Workshop. [/*<][*<] Heavier modding with the Nexus, Nexus Mod Manager and LOOT mod sorting. [/*<][*<] REAL modding with sophisticated 3rd party tools like Mod Organizer or Wrye Bash, + helper utilities like SKSE, TES5EDIT, Texture Optimizers, LOOT, dynamic patchers, mod guides etc. [/*<] [/list<] Skyrim needs ALOT of help to run lots of mods, and the Workshop + Bethesda just don't cut it. Fallout 4 will likely be the same.

      • ImSpartacus
      • 4 years ago

      Cmon, “Real” modding? Get off the high horse.

        • bthylafh
        • 4 years ago

        He’s not wrong. If you heavily mod New Vegas (for instance) you have to pay attention to load order or your mods will wind up tripping over each other.

        As to the “real” thing, that’s for major modifications that replace the crappy Bethesda GUI with something better or stuff that’s outright total conversions into a very different game, things that the GECK, etc. don’t support by themselves. He’s not saying that your Thomas mod is sissy stuff, he means it’s light and not needing special treatment to work.

          • brucethemoose
          • 4 years ago

          This ^

          Some mods still step on each other once you get the load order sorted out, which is where dynamic patches, invididual compatibility patches and such come in. Sometimes there will just be conflicts.

          The world of Skyrim modding is a deep, deep rabbit hole. You can spend 24 hours JUST installing mods and barely scratch the surface of the community.

            • bthylafh
            • 4 years ago

            Modding is the real win for FO4 being 64-bit. I don’t mod that game quite so heavily, but Skyrim’s 32-bit address space really limits how many mods you can run at once, even with the 4GB patch.

            • K-L-Waster
            • 4 years ago

            The 64 bit address space will definitely help in cases where the load order is hitting peak memory limits (I haven’t seen whether or not FO4 has the same memory heap issue that Skyrim did and that SKSE’s memory patch helps you work around — one would hope they didn’t implement a similar architecture in a 64 bit game, but I can’t say for sure whether they *did* or not….).

            But memory issues are by no means the only thing that causes modded Beth games to crash. I wouldn’t count on 64 bitness alone being the universal panacea.

          • jessterman21
          • 4 years ago

          Very true. I hit major conflicts by the time I had about 20 mods from the Steam Workshop installed. Had to do some research, and switched over to Nexus Mod Manager + LOOT (BOSS at the time). Now I have 160+ ESPs installed, plus many texture/model replacers and it’s all running smoothly. Well, on new saves that is…

            • Voldenuit
            • 4 years ago

            Yeah, I also switched to nexus mod manager, because I got tired of having to manually recompile scripts every time I wanted to add (or remove) mods in Witcher 3.

            But I like having the control over my mods in NMM that Steam Workshop doesn’t give me.

    • Jambe
    • 4 years ago

    [quote=”Bruno Ferreira”<]Integrating Fallout 4 with the Steam Workshop should make things a lot easier for everyone involved.[/quote<] Who said they were using Steam Workshop? Is that your supposition, Mr. Ferreira? Howard didn't mention it in the interview. It's not that it's unlikely, I just haven't seen it explicitly confirmed anywhere.

      • morphine
      • 4 years ago

      You’re actually correct. The PC version of the game is sold through Steam and Bethesda used the Workshop before with Skyrim, so it stands to reason Fallout 4 will use it as well. (Plus, there are some rumors about SW support already being baked into the game).

      So despite all indications in that direction, there is, in fact, no official word on that. The article was updated to reflect that. Thanks.

        • K-L-Waster
        • 4 years ago

        Not to mention that Steam Workshop is a *downgrade* from Nexus, not an upgrade.

        Release of the CK is definitely welcome though.

    • TwoEars
    • 4 years ago

    NexusMods is great, easy to use and keeps the quality of content high. There really is no need for steam and bethesda to meddle in this. I have a hard time seeing it as anything else than that bethesda and steam wants us to start paying for mods on steam and then take a BIG slice of the action in the process. I’d rather just donate to the nexus if that’s the case.

      • DancinJack
      • 4 years ago

      This is the Creation Kit. It is needed.

      • Voldenuit
      • 4 years ago

      +1

      I prefer Nexusmods as it gives me more control over what happens with the mods I install and when they get updated (if at all).

      For some mods, I prefer to further tweak the .ini and script files to my liking, and would rather not have an automatic update override my settings.

      • brucethemoose
      • 4 years ago

      We saw how well that went over last time. I’d be surprised if they tried again.

        • Voldenuit
        • 4 years ago

        We saw how unrepentant Blehsoft and Valve were.

        I’d be more surprised if they didn’t.

          • brucethemoose
          • 4 years ago

          Gaben’s apology was actually pretty good.

          Bethesda’s was not.

            • Voldenuit
            • 4 years ago

            The one where he admitted they were out of touch with their customers and vowed to improve that and their customer service?

            And nothing changed?

    • Redundant
    • 4 years ago

    Steam Workshop is ok for some games. But, for Bethesda’s games the Nexus and ModOrgranizer are a more robust option. With load order, bashed patches, Merged patches, LOOT, skyproc patchers, and the other blah blah blah it’s hard to imagine the frustration of relying only on Steam Workshop for a Bethesda game.

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