Asus GeForce GTX 950-2G can run without a 6-pin power plug

Nvidia's GeForce GTX 950 graphics card is already thrifty on power, but a new version of the card from Asus looks even more efficient. The company's GeForce GTX 950-2G has a near-reference spec sheet, with 768 stream processors, a 128-bit memory bus, and 2GB of RAM. The card is also clocked at 1026MHz base and 1190MHz boost speeds. Get this, though: Asus says the card has a board power of 75W and doesn't need a six-pin PCIe power connector.

There's a dizzying array of GTX 950s out there, but this Asus card appears to be the first that doesn't require external power. A drop-in GTX 950 would represent a nice boost in performance for systems that can't provide external power to the graphics card. Nvidia's own GeForce GTX 750 Ti was the previous low-power champion for systems with that restriction. Perhaps we'll see similar cards from other Nvidia board partners soon.

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    • Chrispy_
    • 4 years ago

    This will make a lot of HTPC users happy

    • ozzuneoj
    • 4 years ago

    This is good news, as I’m certainly a fan of efficient GPUs… but why does it have such a big cooler? If the card itself absolutely has to be that long and full-height, it seems like a flatter single-slot type card with a blower would be a lot more attractive.

    • hasseb64
    • 4 years ago

    who need this? Poor upgraders without integrated intel GPU?

      • auxy
      • 4 years ago

      This is still faster than even the fastest Intel GPU to date. It’s quite a bit faster than the typical HD 4600 or HD 530.

      • ImSpartacus
      • 4 years ago

      Those that own oem machines that come with useless discrete cards. The chitzy psu inevitably won’t have any power connectors. However the cpu is often satisfactory.

      You drop in a card like this and the machine can instantly game at 1080p.

        • Voldenuit
        • 4 years ago

        [quote<]Those that own oem machines that come with useless discrete cards. The chitzy psu inevitably won't have any power connectors. However the cpu is often satisfactory.[/quote<] You could use molex-->PEG or SATA-->PEG converters, though. Many cards even come with them in the box. It would have been nice if ASUS had included the 6-pin port anyway and made it optional unless you wanted more power for overclocking.

      • Voldenuit
      • 4 years ago

      People who bought a prebuilt Dell or hp system with a wimpy 300W power supply?

      That was supposedly why the 750Ti was so successful, but not sure if there are enough of those users left over for the 950 G2 to fill in the gaps.

      Now if they had made this a half-height or single slot card, they would have opened up a whole other class of users (the Radeon 4850 was a single slot card, and it was 114W).

        • ImSpartacus
        • 4 years ago

        That’s an interesting perspective – single slot coolers.

        I wonder if the beefier cooler can sometimes indirectly improve the power figures by keeping the entire apparatus in a chilly (and efficient) state. By that I mean that a single slot cooler might still prevent a 950 from overheating, but it might not allow it to run efficiently enough to get down to 75W. Sorta like how amd used an aio to keep the Fury x chilly in order to improve efficiency.

        Though it’s entirely possible that the industry simply standardized on two slot coolers and is reluctant to make anything slimmer.

        • BobbinThreadbare
        • 4 years ago

        You can get an R9 285 in single height, which I believe is much more powerful than a 950. So I don’t think there’s any reason they couldn’t do this.

    • xeridea
    • 4 years ago

    So its basically a downclocked 950. Perhaps there is some binning but most of the power reduction probably comes from lower clocks.

      • travbrad
      • 4 years ago

      “The card is also clocked at 1026MHz base and 1190MHz boost speeds.”

      It’s clocked a couple mhz higher than a “reference” card, so it depends on your definition. It’s not downclocked compared to reference clockspeeds, but most GTX 950s on the market are “factory overclocked” more than this one. In any case we are talking about around 100mhz difference from the average 950, which won’t make for a huge performance difference.

        • Concupiscence
        • 4 years ago

        Yep – probably down to a combination of finding specially binned GTX 950 chips that would run at a lower voltage and the cards applying turbo less enthusiastically than most others.

      • Jeff Kampman
      • 4 years ago

      For what it’s worth, you can flip on an “OC Mode” that boosts the clocks significantly. I just reported the base clocks because most people probably aren’t going to install Asus’ GPU Tweak utility and actually tick that box.

    • watzupken
    • 4 years ago

    It is nice to see a competent low power card. However, I am wondering with the reduction in power requirement, is there a need for such a big cooler? Also, I wonder how much Asus will price this.

      • xeridea
      • 4 years ago

      Lower temperatures results in lower power usage.

        • watzupken
        • 4 years ago

        Which should correspondingly result in lower heat output and makes sense to make a smaller card/ cooler. The benefits of a bigger cooler is of course to lower the temp and less noise due to bigger fans. But I would have thought this card suits more of a small form HTPC/ gaming rig, so a smaller form factor should suit their target market.

    • anotherengineer
    • 4 years ago

    WHAT!?!!

    NO GOOD!!

    Everyone’s 600W+ power supply is going to waste!!!

      • Ninjitsu
      • 4 years ago

      450W Platinum rated modular PSUs are the future.

        • JustAnEngineer
        • 4 years ago

        The future is now, if you have $87.
        [url<]http://pcpartpicker.com/parts/power-supply/#xcx=0&e=6,5&sort=a9&page=1[/url<]

          • ImSpartacus
          • 4 years ago

          That $67 650w evga unit looks interesting, though I’m not familiar with it.

          In general, it’s nice to see efficient units getting cheaper. I wonder if there were “shortcuts” on the road to efficiency.

    • Freon
    • 4 years ago

    So given the 750 Ti is also a Maxwell architecture part I wonder if this thing isn’t really any better than a 750 Ti OC that uses up the same 75W envelope.

      • Mikael33
      • 4 years ago

      Dude it has a higher number, of course it’s better.

      • auxy
      • 4 years ago

      750Ti is Maxwell 1.0 or “proto-Maxwell” — GTX 950 is a real Maxwell part. There are significant differences, most notably framebuffer compression, that make the GTX 950 much, much faster.

        • Freon
        • 4 years ago

        edit: misreply

      • DPete27
      • 4 years ago

      [url=https://techreport.com/review/29061/nvidia-geforce-gtx-950-graphics-card-reviewed/11<]Only about 60% higher performance[/url<]....pretty much insignificant....

        • Mikael33
        • 4 years ago

        See, when in doubt remember that a product with a higher number is almost always faster, that’s why it has a larger number, denoting the performance of it.

          • BobbinThreadbare
          • 4 years ago

          This is often untrue.

            • crabjokeman
            • 4 years ago

            [url<]http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/sarcasm[/url<]

        • Freon
        • 4 years ago

        With 50% more TDP.

    • NeelyCam
    • 4 years ago

    Damn.

    Imagine how it’s going to be when 14/16nm chips are coming out…

    • Welch
    • 4 years ago

    It seems like this is a bit late to the game. With the right-around-the-corner next generation GPUs being “half” the power consumption… a card with this or more performance not requiring a PCI-E power plug will be much more common. Unless you have an immediate need for a card like this, I’d wait.

      • Ninjitsu
      • 4 years ago

      I don’t think so – unless Pascal’s intro repeats Maxwell’s, 1050-series cards are quite some time away.

    • brucethemoose
    • 4 years ago

    For a second, I was afraid this was a rebranded 750 TI, but it’s actually a cut-down 960. Cool.

    • chuckula
    • 4 years ago

    Hrmm…. when the next-gen version of this card class launches for Pascal then I might grab one for my office system that definitely doesn’t need gaming GPU power but could use a more power efficient GPU that also supports video decode for modern formats like HEVC.

    I’m using a GTX-560 right now that’s actually recycled from a previous life. It does OK, but running cooler & having a more modern feature set would be nice.

    • torquer
    • 4 years ago

    Perhaps this is the rumored 950se?

      • Jeff Kampman
      • 4 years ago

      I’m trying to find that out as we speak.

    • ImSpartacus
    • 4 years ago

    Very cool, it kinda sucked that the 950 was to hungry to achieve this in its stock config. Good guy asus somehow gets it done though.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 4 years ago

      Power consumption was already way low, with entire systems with Core i7-5960X processors consuming under 200W. It probably didn’t take much for ASUS to get to a point it could ditch the power plugs.

      [url<]https://techreport.com/review/29061/nvidia-geforce-gtx-950-graphics-card-reviewed/10[/url<]

        • ImSpartacus
        • 4 years ago

        I know it was close. The 950 was a gm107 replacement after all. So it’s not like asus had to move mountains.

        And yet, I don’t know if another 950 that can thrive at that 75W budget, so asus obviously achieved something.

        I think the market for drop-in-and-forget cards is bigger than people think. A lot of would-be pc gamers use oem machines that don’t always have pcie power cables. It’s a shame, but it’s a reality. Honestly, I’m kinda excited for Polaris 10 (and potentially Pascal) for exactly that reason. We’ll get a healthy performance bump in the <75W space.

          • Concupiscence
          • 4 years ago

          They must have gotten access to a run of binned chips capable of running at a lower voltage than the stock 950s. I’m tempted to replace the R7 260X in my home theater PC with one of these, but I don’t think the speed improvement would be worth the cash outlay.

            • anotherengineer
            • 4 years ago

            Especially if you happen to live in Canada

            [url<]http://www.newegg.ca/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814487158&cm_re=gtx_950-_-14-487-158-_-Product[/url<] +13% and shipping, that works out to a $286 card.

            • ImSpartacus
            • 4 years ago

            I would wait for Polaris 10. In cherry-picked AMD-designed benchmarks, Polaris 10 was upwards to 1.5-2x more efficient than a 950.

            But I anticipate that Pascal will also have a good successor to the 950.

            Either way, you’ll get an upgrade-worthy performance bump from your 260X.

            • JustAnEngineer
            • 4 years ago

            Agreed. I would [b<]not[/b<] jump from a Radeon R7-260/360 (Bonaire) to GeForce GTX950 (GM206-250) when Polaris is due relatively soon.

            • DPete27
            • 4 years ago

            I doubt that there will be any 14/16nm GPUs released this year that will challenge this on the consumer market. Nvidia & AMD will be focused on their top tier and OEM cards until yields increase.

            • Demetri
            • 4 years ago

            The chip AMD demoed at CES was compared directly to the 950 and is supposed to be the first to launch, primarily as a mobile chip, but there will be a desktop version as well. They’re trying to get it out the door and make inroads into the laptop market before back-to-school season.

            • ImSpartacus
            • 4 years ago

            It’s already been confirmed by koduri’s venturebeat interview that amd will release two Polaris chips, Polaris 10 and Polaris 11.

            Because of the ces Polaris-950 demo, it’s highly speculated that Polaris 10 will drop exactly into this part of the market. It’s meant to bring console-tier performance to laptops and 75W cards (e.g. “450-460”).

            And as a side bar, because of Roy Taylor’s vrla where he hawked a Polaris-card to directly compete at the vr min spec, it’s speculated that Polaris 11 replaces Hawaii with a “470” line of cards.

            Then fiji handles the “480” cards and you’ve got a 2016 lineup. Boom.

            Greenland drops a new fury in 2017 and everyone’s happy.

    • Visigoth
    • 4 years ago

    I don’t normally say this, but that’s a really beautiful GPU. I would like to see it fanless though, even if it needs a huge copper heatsink.

    • DancinJack
    • 4 years ago

    What a name

      • ColeLT1
      • 4 years ago

      Better than my “EVGA GeForce GTX 970 04G-P4-3975-KR 4GB SSC GAMING ACX 2.0+.”

        • Srsly_Bro
        • 4 years ago

        04G-P4-3975-KR is the model number, not the name. Why not throw in some other things that don’t belong? Throw in “PCI Express Three Point Zero Intel and AMD Compatible Dual Fan Makes Lots of Noise” I can go on with more things that aren’t the name.

          • ColeLT1
          • 4 years ago

          It was a copy/past from newegg’s title of the card, with “w/” removed to save space. It would probably be correctly named an EVGA GeForce GTX970 SuperSC ACX 2.0+.
          [url<]http://i.imgur.com/Muzvw4i.png[/url<] I see Asus GeForce GTX 950-2G, and think oh a Asus GTX950 with 2GB of ram. what does SSC GAMING w/ACX 2.0+ or SuperSC mean anyway (Super Super Clock?)

            • auxy
            • 4 years ago

            SSC is indeed Super Superclocked, as dumb as it is. Just refers to a version of the card that’s significantly overclocked from the reference design.

            ACX 2.0+ is the cooler design.

            TMYK (*’▽’)

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