Windows 10 Mobile now available for some Windows 8.1 devices

Microsoft has announced that select Windows Phone 8.1 devices can now be upgraded to Windows 10 Mobile. Unfortunately, not all Windows Phone 8.1 handsets are eligible. Microsoft says some devices "are not able to successfully upgrade without an impact on the customer experience." That includes some devices that are already running Windows 10 as part of Microsoft's insider program. The phones that made the cut include the following (deep breath):

  • Lumia 1520
  • Lumia 930
  • Lumia 640
  • Lumia 640XL
  • Lumia 730
  • Lumia 735
  • Lumia 830
  • Lumia 532
  • Lumia 535
  • Lumia 540
  • Lumia 635 1GB
  • Lumia 636 1GB
  • Lumia 638 1GB
  • Lumia 430
  • Lumia 435
  • BLU Win HD w510u
  • BLU Win HD LTE x150q
  • MCJ Madosma Q501

Microsoft is providing a free app that checks to see if a device is eligible. That app—the Windows 10 Upgrade Advisor—is available via the Windows Store.

Windows 10 is no stranger to the smartphone space, even if Windows Mobile's market share is hovering in the low single digits. Microsoft unveiled the flagship Lumia 950 and Lumia 950 XL last October, and a handful of other Windows 10 devices have hit the market since then.

Comments closed
    • SixIron
    • 4 years ago

    Much appreciated article, especially the tip on the upgrade advisor. It got the ball rolling for me and Win 10 is now downloading on my BLU Win HD.

    • Deanjo
    • 4 years ago

    Meanwhile the Win 10 upgrade harassment has stepped up it’s game and started to force upgrades on systems it appears.

    [url<]http://www.infoworld.com/article/3043526/microsoft-windows/microsoft-upgraded-users-to-windows-10-without-their-ok.html[/url<]

    • DancinJack
    • 4 years ago

    lol. I kinda feel bad for WP. It’s not an awful platform, but there is just no way it’s surviving.

      • Hinton
      • 4 years ago

      Uh, no, its the best platform.

        • HisDivineOrder
        • 4 years ago

        The best platform has a lot of frequently updated important, must-have apps because the OS running your phone is less important than the experiences it offers you.

        Unfortunately, Windows Phone has two problems here. Most apps that come out for other platforms don’t come to it. And, perhaps more importantly, most apps that do come to it don’t get the frequency of updates that other versions on other platforms do, which eventually leads to those apps becoming out of date.

        Nothing seems to resolve these problems and while these remain true, Windows Phone will NEVER be “the best platform.”

          • auxy
          • 4 years ago

          I would argue that for many people’s usecases your entire post is crap because they don’t use “apps” on their phone. For many people the phone is a phone and a camera and that’s it, and the only important thing (software-wise) is that it doesn’t run down the battery and it doesn’t crash. Basically, “does it work”?

          For those people, I suspect Windows Phone may in fact be “the best platform”.

          [sub<]I'll stick to Android, thanks. (*'▽') At least until Windows phone is running on x86 hardware with full Win32 API support![/sub<]

            • cphite
            • 4 years ago

            Meh.

            I’ve been using a WP for almost two years now, and while I actually *kinda* agree with you on the usability thing, I will be jumping ship in a month or so and I wouldn’t recommend WP to anybody at this point.

            In terms of sheer usability it rocks. No, really… I can honestly say that out of all the smartphones I’ve owned, WP is my favorite in terms of how it works. I like the look and feel, the speed and fluidity; I love how easy and intuitive all of the setup and basic functionality is. In those things, I prefer it to any Android or iPhone that I’ve used.

            So why am I jumping ship? Mainly because if you want to do anything with your phone beyond the most basic stuff, your options are just too limited. There are far fewer apps available, and much of what is available is amateurish, or abandoned by developers. This includes things that, these days, are considered core features of a smartphone – things like GPS navigation for example.

            Even web browsing is limited – I can’t tell you how many pages render improperly or in some cases fail to load on my phone, even when trying alternate browsers.

            Upgrades are a crap shoot. For example, I got my phone several months after WP8.1 was released but it was nearly a year later that I was able to upgrade; and the first upgrade bricked my phone. Windows 10 will probably never be supported. Indeed, the list of hardware that actually supports W10 is pretty limited.

            In short, while the OS itself is pretty slick, the support for it from MS has been dismal. They can make all the excuses they like – Google and Apple had too large a lead, etc – but the cold hard truth is the WP is dying because MS has utterly sucked at supporting it. They’ve made little to no effort to attract app developers, or hardware vendors, or – frankly – even customers.

            Sorry, but to even be a “good” platform, let alone the “best” platform, you’ve gotta do more than just the bare minimum.

          • cygnus1
          • 4 years ago

          Don’t underestimate the appeal of UWP to businesses. It could actually turn the app tide since MS has made it so easy to port apps between it and other platforms.

            • faramir
            • 4 years ago

            Desktop applications aren’t really suitable for tiny mobile screens and vice versa. Portability sounds nice but there is a reason why businesses stick to desktop boxes for real work and mobile devices for communication.

            • derFunkenstein
            • 4 years ago

            You’re forgetting that many developers are ignoring both Win 10 desktop and Win 10 phone together, which doesn’t make porting very easy. :p Until MS makes the draconian decision to kill Win32, you won’t see a big uptick in UWP.

            They made it easy to port apps with Windows 8, too. All you had to do was design a larger UI and repackage it. It didn’t seem to matter.

            • cygnus1
            • 4 years ago

            I was more meaning the source portability MS has engineered with UWP between Windows and iOS. This is something that large businesses are going to jump on for their LOB apps. I don’t think it’s been available long enough for major fruits to be available yet. But there is an army of developers out there with relevant experience on these MS platforms and tools.

            I don’t know what it will do to the quality of apps on iOS, but I think it will certainly be increasing the number of apps in the Windows Store in the long run. And that will certainly help the relevancy of Win10 and Win10 Mobile.

            • derFunkenstein
            • 4 years ago

            They’re dumping that in favor of the Xamarin acquisition, though, right? I was under the impression that the iOS bridge for Visual Studio was being killed off.

            edit: (sorry) The bigger point being that you still have to write for Windows first, when most mobile apps are written for iOS or Android first and ported to the other platforms.

            The project I work on is written in Genero BDL and, along with a browser app, it’s built for both Android an iOS together, and there’s no way to build a Windows Phone app. And we’re not going to rewrite it for a supremely tiny portion of the market. The same would be true of developers that write in Android Studio or Xcode first, I’m assuming.

            • cygnus1
            • 4 years ago

            [url<]http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2016/02/microsoft-confirms-android-on-windows-astoria-tech-is-gone/[/url<] [url<]http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2015/11/divisive-android-app-support-for-windows-mobile-dropped-maybe-even-discarded/[/url<] They've killed the android-on-windows layer, Astoria, but Islandwood is still a thing. That plus Xamarin make a pretty compelling sales pitch. And it's not rewriting to just get Windows Phone. It's rewriting/porting to get all of Windows. I realize it's definitely a non-trivial amount of effort, but for the possibility of having your app run on the large mobile platforms, plus Windows/Xbox/WinMobile you don't think there are software companies out there that would definitely start considering moving to that? And my reference to the army of developers and what it might do to app quality, was to the army of .net developers out there that can start applying their skills to writing apps that will run on iOS and Android on top of the Windows platforms they already target.

            • derFunkenstein
            • 4 years ago

            I think that at least in the short term, you’re going to see what you’ve been seeing: “Oh, hey, we made a UWP version of our app…it only does about 1/2 of the iOS/Android version, and it doesn’t do any of that particularly well, but now we can check the box. Windows.”

            Down the road, when it comes to new projects and people want to target UWP along with Android and iOS, then sure. Eventually. Maybe. But it’s a chicken-and-egg thing.

            • cygnus1
            • 4 years ago

            Agreed for sure on the short term. I think it’ll be interesting enough to companies to at least make a cut down version of their app on UWP. But that could very well be the MS “infection” route as I would call it. Get a company to make any kind of UWP version of an app and then sell them hard on focusing their future development on that version since they’ll be able to consolidate down to mostly one core code base that just has platform specific UIs. It will also greatly depend on how well MS can keep up with changes in new versions of iOS and Android. Developers could become extremely MS dependent to keep up on the new OS versions when your not developing your app in the intended/native environment.

            • cphite
            • 4 years ago

            Dunno… they’ve made it easier but it still depends on app developers deciding that it’s worth their time to bother. I honestly don’t see that happening, at least not in any significant numbers. It may improve the variety of apps available to WP users a little bit; but I just don’t see it being enough to boost their market share in any noticeable way – much less turn any tides.

            Don’t get me wrong, I’d love to believe it… as I said upthread, I really do like the OS… but I think it’s done. They missed their chance to be a viable player in the market. The sad part is, they did a great job on the actual product – they just completely eff’ed up the marketing and support.

          • green
          • 4 years ago

          [quote<]The best platform has a lot of frequently updated important, must-have apps because the OS running your phone is less important than the experiences it offers you.[/quote<] if an app, or feature if you will, is a "must-have" then is it not simply something the platform was missing? if the feature is so "must-have", is it not an indicator that the feature should have come with platform? that there are a "lot" of these must-have features would mean the original platform did next to nothing frankly, the only "must-have" you need on a phone these days is internet access everything else tends to be from "really nice to have" down to "nice fad"

            • bhtooefr
            • 4 years ago

            The “must haves” on a smartphone platform include “latest fad compliance”, though.

            But, Windows on phones is worse off than that. Even some things that are considered “basic functionality” nowadays, you get barely functional versions. (YouTube, for instance. You get… the mobile web version.) And, worse, even [i<]Microsoft[/i<] services often work better on iOS and Android than on Windows Phone, due to those versions being updated first, because they're the ones with users.

            • sweatshopking
            • 4 years ago

            YouTube apps are many and significantly better than googles YouTube app on android. You want an official name fine, but there is no shortage of high quality youtube apps on wp. As for your second point, yes.

        • DancinJack
        • 4 years ago

        Best at what? Losing market share? Not having popular/useful apps? Not having developer support? Having a minuscule selection of phones to choose from?

        I’m not denying it has its bright spots, but I don’t think that’s enough to overcome the negative momentum.

    • EzioAs
    • 4 years ago

    Is that app only available on certain regions or something? I can’t seem to find it.

      • glacius555
      • 4 years ago

      Just change your region to US. The app is called “Upgrade Advisor”. I did it detected and allowed the update, I changed back to my own region before update 🙂

        • EzioAs
        • 4 years ago

        Thanks for the tip. I’m currently running Win 10 now.

    • derFunkenstein
    • 4 years ago

    No surprise to see the Lumia Icon (aka the Verizon-encumbered version of the Lumia 930) left off the list. They’re going all out with this whole no Windows Phone thing.

    But how is the 920 and 820 left off the list when they’re far more powerful than devices like the 430 and 535? Same for the HTC One m8 for Windows and Samsung’s higher-end WP devices. Looks like those companies know a good time to dump an OS.

      • Hinton
      • 4 years ago

      My Lumia 520 is running Windows 10. How great its doing it I can’t really tell.

      • LostCat
      • 4 years ago

      I believe they said quite some time ago the initial release list would be limited.

      I’m not saying I know what the plans are mind you.

      • Klimax
      • 4 years ago

      It’s surprising. I had W10 M on 820 at it was no worse then on 830. (Unfortunately, phone got killed by falling tiny metal souvenir axe…)

      Don’t know how the hell they got that impression.

      • Ryhadar
      • 4 years ago

      The wording of their post seems to indicate that more devices are going to be added as time goes on.

      Though even if that doesn’t pan out if you [i<]really[/i<] wanted windows 10 mobile you could always join the insider program and adjust your update settings accordingly. Though Microsoft has said if you're not on the list expect even fast ring updates to cease eventually. Not sure of any other caveats.

        • sweatshopking
        • 4 years ago

        HTC seems to be the ones not bothering to complete the upgrade, yezz as well. Blu is going ahead.
        There will be no more devices added, except MAYBE the icon. It is a direct contradiction to previous statements which stated all windows 8.1 would qualify. Annoying and stupid.
        Other devices can still qualify with the insider program, including the 920’s, HTC, etc. But they will not be receiving the Redstone updates, just windows 10 threshold, though that makes sense. The 920/520, etc. Simply aren’t fast enough.

        Classic MS.

      • DragonDaddyBear
      • 4 years ago

      If I had to guess it’s because they’d rather you buy a new phone. Companies don’t typically update phones for very long. Even Google has a cut off of about 2 years for Nexus phones.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 4 years ago

        And people wonder why Apple sells so many phones. They’re still updating 2012’s iPhone 5.

        Not the only reason, mind you, but a heck of a selling point. Don’t get left behind on security updates for the useful life of the device.

        • VincentHanna
        • 4 years ago

        True, but an added side effect of that type of policy includes a better than decent chance that whomever it is will switch allegiances, which is a policy that the windows phone platform can’t really afford.

      • chµck
      • 4 years ago

      I have build 10586.164 (the latest version) on a 920, 640, 635, and 520.
      Just need a windows insider account (free) and download the app (free) off the store.

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