Asus offers an exchange program for some PG279Q displays

Asus is offering a free one-time exchange of select ROG Swift PG279Q G-Sync monitors. The move comes after a rash of customer complaints over backlight bleed and "IPS glow." The offer only applies to monitors produced in the initial production batches. The monitor must also have been purchased in North America. Monitors with the following serial numbers are eligible:

  • F9LMQS064281 to F9LMQS066024
  • F9LMQS085294 to F9LMQS085313
  • FALMQS088716 to FALMQS089177

Asus says its quality control has improved since the PG279Q was released, and that's why units from later production runs aren't eligible. The company says it's also introducing an extra layer of quality control checks in North America for the PG279Q. Asus claims that it's subjecting every one of these displays to a visual inspection in a darkened environment before passing them on to retailers. It explains that this process is the reason why some PG279Qs shipped to North American customers appear to have been opened prior to final shipment.

The company does caution that "IPS glow" is an inherent characteristic of this panel type. The phenomenon presents as a hazy, greyish cast that worsens when the screen is viewed at extreme off-center angles. That's distinct from backlight bleed, where points of uneven brightness show up on the perimeter of the display and don't change in intensity when viewed from off-angles.

This is a significant gesture by Asus. The PG279Q is a high-end display that sells for about $800. Both the PG279Q and its FreeSync brother, the MG279Q, are favorites of ours here at TR for their combination of large 2560×1440 panels and variable-refresh-rate support.

Comments closed
    • torquer
    • 4 years ago

    I had a bad ROG Swift and when RMA’ed it came back to me with a destroyed stand and a panel that looked like someone took steel wool to it. Sold it and got a Dell G-Sync. Never looked back.

    Asus makes some good stuff but QC is terrible.

    • south side sammy
    • 4 years ago

    guess it’s a good way to avoid a class action lawsuit and keep official” from digging into your business practices.
    on a positive note, ASUS can resell these bad ones in Africa like Ford did to the recalled Pintos back in the 70’s. ( ever play FarCry2 )?

    • moose17145
    • 4 years ago

    Honestly… the horrid reviews of Asus’ QC is what has scared me away from it’s FreeSync brother, the MG279Q.

    Like someone else has stated, I have spent more on my motorcycle on just Maintenance than what this monitor costs… but there are so many reviews of the MG279Q showing up with dead pixels, and extreme (and uneven) IPS glow and back light bleed that I had basically decided to just not get the monitor. Which is a shame, because this was a monitor I REALLY had my eyes on and which I WAS legitimately going to get. I initially chalked it up to initial production run issues and figured I would wait. Months had since passed, and it seems the situation has barely improved from the reviews I am seeing.

    I don’t know what is going on over at Asus… but it would seem they need to fix their QC.

    Edit: Grammar is hard after a long week of work…

    • mkk
    • 4 years ago

    Never buy a just released Asus monitor.

    • guardianl
    • 4 years ago

    This QC issue(s) also seemed to plague an early run of Acer XB270HU monitors which uses a similar panel from AU Optronics.

    [url=http://www.overclock.net/t/1549176/official-acer-predator-xb270hu-owners-club<]Spreadsheet with user reported issues here.[/url<] AUO primarily makes low-end displays, and my guess is that they have a lot (moderate) QC issues. Entering the high-end market with their AHVA panels is probably a little bit of a wake up call to the expectations people have for $1000 displays. 🙂

    • Chrispy_
    • 4 years ago

    Whilst this is a significant gesture and Asus should be commended for doing what is right, these panels have [b<]VAST markup[/b<] on them and customers are fully justified in expecting [b<]fully tested, bleed free panels in the first place.[/b<] G-Sync module aside, these monitors are not expensive to produce. I think Asus use [url=http://www.panelook.com/M270DAN02.5_AUO_27.0_LCM_overview_23497.html<]this panel[/url<] but whether I'm right or not is irrelevant, since that is AUO's most expensive QHD 27" IPS panel and it's [url=http://www.alibaba.com/product-detail/AUO-27-Quad-HD-IPS-Desktop_60216276815.html<]under $100[/url<], probably closer to $50 in the quantities ASUS source them. The Koreans can (and do) make profit on similar monitors for $300. I've already linked why the panels aren't responsible for the $900 pricetag and we know that the G-Sync module, though expensive, is barely a fraction of the $900. The reason it's a $900 monitor is markup. R&D costs etc, sure - but the takehome fact here is that these are Halo products with profit margins that dwarf commodity screens, so NOBODY should be getting anything other than a fully tested, cherry-picked panel that meets the highest QC. Why even allow a $900 monitor out of the factory if it's not A-grade - it's only going to hurt your reputation and quite honestly the horror stories of backlight bleed have already scared away several prospective buyers, I'm sure (because I'm one).

      • drfish
      • 4 years ago

      Preach it!

      • CasbahBoy
      • 4 years ago

      You’ve nailed every point related to the reason I haven’t bought one yet – despite waiting what feels like an eternity for a 1440p 27″ adaptive sync IPS 120Hz+ display. I’ve paid for unnecessary performance modifications for my car that are more than this display, sure, but it doesn’t make $800+ for this feel any less like highway robbery.

      Somebody is willing to pay that much, clearly – while it isn’t palpable to us, I’m not sure I can actually fault Asus for doing it. Right now the monitor is listing for *$1100* on NewEgg.

    • christos_thski
    • 4 years ago

    That’s nice. So if someone has one of the affected monitors in Europe, Asia, or South America, tough luck, right? At least they’ve publicized the affected batches, so you’ll be certain Asus has pulled one over you with a substandard product, and won’t stand by its products unless you’re in the “right” region.

    Guess Asus is one manufacturer I’m excluding from future purchases.

    • Kretschmer
    • 4 years ago

    I wonder why this doesn’t also apply to the MG279Q? I can’t see excessive bleeding on my unit, but have little to no sensitivity to these things.

      • Terra_Nocuus
      • 4 years ago

      Does the MG have the 165Hz panel? It could be the difference in panel type / model that’s at issue here

        • Chrispy_
        • 4 years ago

        There’s no such thing as a 165Hz panel according to the global panel database; it’s Just Asus factory-overclocking the existing 144Hz panel.

          • Terra_Nocuus
          • 4 years ago

          So then, perhaps, the factory-overclocked panel (i.e., a difference in the panel) is what’s the issue here?

      • slowriot
      • 4 years ago

      I have a MG279Q and had to get the first unit replaced because back light bleed being so terrible. The replacement model I got was much better but still has some issues.

      • Tirk
      • 4 years ago

      Maybe Nvidia fanboys, I mean GPU owners, are used to cheap TN panels and are not aware that IPS panels have “IPS glow”. They must have already dipped into their parent’s credit to buy the expensive GSync panel in the first place right?

      OK, I’m kidding don’t go tattle on me 😉 but I couldn’t help but poke fun at the elitist mentality some GSync owners have.

      On subject, I have a MG279Q and it definitely has IPS glow. Its acceptable and expected since it is of course an IPS panel but having compared it to Samsungs’s VA panels the slight edge in screen quality goes to VA but I still like and use both.

        • slowriot
        • 4 years ago

        Does your MG279Q have backlight bleed? I’m on my second. The first was terrible, visible in anything remotely “dark” on screen, and the second still has it more than I’d like but its acceptable. It does very well with IPS glow though IMO. Better than the Dell U2414H I have next to it and way,way better than the Dell U3415H I tried.

        In general, Asus has some great models but their QC is definitely sub par. Overall I am happy with the MG279Q. I enjoy 144Hz way more than I suspected I would.

          • Tirk
          • 4 years ago

          Ok turned it on looking at it right now with the lights off I’d say the IPS glow is more noticeable than the backlight bleed. The worst backlight bleed is in the bottom right corner but I only notice it if I display the whole screen in black and in a dark room. The IPS glow is always noticeable, giving that shifting glow haze as you move your head. I’d say its not the best IPS panel I’ve had in terms of IPS glow but its definitely not the worst and still enjoyable to use.

          Its been hit and miss with me on Dell IPS screens, I have a touchscreen IPS from them that I hardly notice the IPS glow and I’ve had to return a Dell screen but that was a combination of bad backlight bleed and IPS glow.

            • nanoflower
            • 4 years ago

            Yes, I have a Dell P2414H and while it does have the IPS glow it’s not objectionable. I have to have the room darkened and have a black screen up to notice it and then it’s only in one corner.

    • iatacs19
    • 4 years ago

    The ones with the second visual inspection that had the tape broken still had the same problems…
    The real problem is availability. haha

    • Prestige Worldwide
    • 4 years ago

    Nice, good on them for making it right.

      • DrCR
      • 4 years ago

      You must be in North America?

        • Prestige Worldwide
        • 4 years ago

        Didn’t notice that detail on my first read.

        My nice is now downgraded to a sad face.

        🙁

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