Microsoft extends support for older Windows versions on Skylake

There was a bit of hubbub a little while ago about support for older versions of Windows on computers with Skylake CPUs. Microsoft previously announced that Windows 10 would be the only version supported on Skylake systems for the full duration of its support period. Users still running Windows 7 or 8.1 would have had until July 17, 2017, or roughly a year and a half, to move to Windows 10. After that period, older versions of Windows running on Skylake CPUs would only receive critical security updates.

Microsoft has now updated its Skylake support policy, and saw it fit to extend the support period for Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 on Skylake devices. Users now have full support for their OSs until July 17, 2018. This amounts to one year added to the previously-announced cutoff date. After this date, the story is the same as before: users will only receive critical security updates for their systems until their operating systems reach the end of their extended support periods—January 14, 2020 for Windows 7 and January 10, 2023 for Windows 8.1.

The company said this move was prompted by customer feedback after the initial announcement, and should help "customers who have longer deployment timeframes to Windows 10," as well as "purchase modern hardware with confidence."

Comments closed
    • Laykun
    • 4 years ago

    Microsoft really need to start separating it’s kernel from its ux/ui, at the very least. I think it’d make a lot of people happy if Windows became more modular where users can choose the ui they want to use while maintaining a modern up to date kernel and OS. I’d even like to see the ability for community made desktop managers, but that’s a super niche market.

      • the
      • 4 years ago

      Windows is becoming more modular but that’s mainly for the server side to do minimal installs. Gone are the days of weird dependencies. However, that doesn’t mean that there is a major community effort to replace specific parts of Windows with alternatives.

    • GatoRat
    • 4 years ago

    Intel delays Cannonlake, Microsoft extends Skylake support.

    Is anyone cluing in that there is something about Cannonlake generation CPUs that make full support for old operating systems problematic. I’ll wager Linux is also affected and early versions of Linux won’t fully support Cannonlake.

    EDIT: The big difference with Kaby Lake and Cannonlake is SGX (though it’s also being added to Skylake, which will create some confusion.)

    The point is that Windows 7 and 8 will run on Kaby Lake and Cannonlake, but won’t support SGX (and possibly not Optane.) So, if Microsoft said they would fully support 7 and 8 on Kaby Lake and later, that would create legal issues.

      • NovusBogus
      • 4 years ago

      My read on it is more that tick-tock is dead because new CPU technology is hard. Microsoft’s support position is just posturing and the business world doesn’t care (translation: won’t upgrade until 2018) and it’s unlikely Intel has anything to do with it. Intel still technically supports XP, though recent motherboard BIOS broke compatibility.

      • TheMonkeyKing
      • 4 years ago

      I don’t know about you, but when Intel pushes out ‘Crystal Lake’ that’s where I run, not walk, from Intel.

    • hasseb64
    • 4 years ago

    That’s nice of MS! By then WIn10 might be bug free.

    • ronch
    • 4 years ago

    I just hope AMD and Intel will still have Win7 drivers 2 or 3 years from now. I will not touch Win10 with a 10-foot cattle prod.

    • Krogoth
    • 4 years ago

    Methinks, this is actually referring to “SGX” support.

    [url<]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Software_Guard_Extensions[/url<] Skylake is the first consumer-tier chip from Intel to offer it and future x86 silicon from Intel will likely include it. Skylake really doesn't have anything else that is missing from previous generations of x86 silicon that would prevent current and future x86 software from working correctly.

      • GatoRat
      • 4 years ago

      You just answered my speculation from above. SGX is being added to future Skylake CPUs (along with the FDIV bug fix), but this creates even more confusion since knowing the revision of your CPU is not common, even with professionals. I’d rather see Intel just concentrate on Kaby Lake to make the division even more clear.

    • ronch
    • 4 years ago

    Not getting updates is bad, but my bigger concern is whether or not future hardware will include drivers for Windows 7, because without drivers, you can’t even [u<]properly[/u<] complete preparing your spunky new machine for use. If I buy a Cabbie Lake rig and find there are no more drivers for Windows 7, I'm dead. Of course I'll be checking this first before buying given this kind of news. Hardware makers would be wise to include drivers for Windows 7 because many people will stick with it. And given how most people find fewer and fewer reasons to upgrade, giving them another reason to not buy new hardware and just stick to what they have because of lack of drivers seems like a great way to not sell their wares. And if a company doesn't offer drivers while their competitor does (you can be sure AMD will come out with drivers if Intel doesn't), the competition will more likely close the sale.

      • bhtooefr
      • 4 years ago

      [url<]https://blogs.windows.com/windowsexperience/2016/01/15/windows-10-embracing-silicon-innovation/[/url<] [quote<]For example, Windows 10 will be the only supported Windows platform on Intel’s upcoming “Kaby Lake” silicon, Qualcomm’s upcoming “8996” silicon, and AMD’s upcoming “Bristol Ridge” silicon.[/quote<] So, no, AMD won't. Or, if they do, it won't be supported by Microsoft, and probably will run like crap. (Bristol Ridge is even still Excavator-based - Summit Ridge is the Zen-based one.) Enjoy your VIA QuadCore, and not its 8-core successor either, as that looks like it'll use a new chipset. (You're better off with anything Intel as far back as an original Core 2 Quad, or anything AMD as far back as a Phenom X4. Yes, even original Bulldozer.)

    • Mr Bill
    • 4 years ago

    Too late, I already bought the previous gen MSI GE72 Apache 235 laptop instead for that very reason. Because I want to run Win7 Pro.

    • albundy
    • 4 years ago

    lots of marketing word play here…the real deal is support vs functionality. many windows versions should work with any future x86cpu. i don’t see that changing anytime soon. all they seem to be talking about here is windows updates support and scaring the public into buying the latest crapola.

      • oldog
      • 4 years ago

      Buying?

    • auxy
    • 4 years ago

    [quote<]The company said this move was prompted by customer feedback after the initial announcement, and should help "customers who have longer deployment timeframes to Windows 10,"[/quote<]Doesn't this make anyone else's skin crawl? It's literally "you will be assimilated." They don't acknowledge that someone might not want to move to Windows 10, ever -- they literally are saying "people who want to wait longer before moving to Windows 10." This is really endemic to Microsoft as a corporation but they've been especially egregious with it lately. The whole 'big brother' they have is just disturbing.

      • cygnus1
      • 4 years ago

      They don’t really care about people though. People aren’t really their customers. Businesses are. The business customers will be moving on to Windows 10, exactly like MS says here. Just some want to do it later. Most of them pay for Windows and support every year wether they upgrade or not though, through Software Assurance. The real stick is end of support of Win7. MS really doesn’t want Win7 to turn into another XP and hang around for a decade+

        • brucethemoose
        • 4 years ago

        Hell, XP hasn’t really died yet. 5-10% of web traffic (or whatever the XP number is now) is still significant.

        Windows 7 will stick around for a long, long time, whether MS wants it to or not.

          • cygnus1
          • 4 years ago

          I don’t think Win7 will have those numbers when it hits 15 years old. My very large employer is already planning Win10 deployment and the DoD already mandated Win10 deployments, both were on XP less than 5 years ago still. Win7 is going to die much quicker than XP. I could actually see a point come in the future where we see more XP in the wild than Win7.

            • Buzzard44
            • 4 years ago

            Perhaps, but maybe not. Machines running 7 will stay relevant far longer than those running XP did, since the rate of at which we’re improving most computer hardware generation over generation has recently drastically decreased. Also, since we’re at a higher level of capability, there’s a lot more “good enough” machines.

            EX. My old E8400 rig upgraded with an SSD is capable of most anything except playing higher-end games, doing quick video encoding, or niche applications. That machine is 8 years old. An equivalently high end machine from 2002 (~2Ghz early pentium 4) was pretty laughable for contemporary use cases 8 years later in 2010.

            Also, I take planned deployments in large organizations with a grain of salt. Can’t tell you how many times I’ve looked back at timelines years later and laughed at the years of discrepancy between what was planned way back when and what actually happened.

            • cygnus1
            • 4 years ago

            [quote<] Also, I take planned deployments in large organizations with a grain of salt. Can't tell you how many times I've looked back at timelines years later and laughed at the years of discrepancy between what was planned way back when and what actually happened. [/quote<] I can agree with that. But nobody was jumping on Win7 when it first came out. The Vista stink was strong and businesses were still hesitant. I don't think it was truly trusted until SP1 came out about 6 months later, and only after that did it even start being considered as a replacement for XP. Plans for Win10 are at least on paper a lot quicker than they were for Win7.

            • anotherengineer
            • 4 years ago

            No one was jumping on windows 7 when it first came out because

            1. it wasn’t a free upgrade like w10

            2. most people were on XP with 1GB of ram, and ram wasn’t exactly the price/GB it is now.

            3. there was a lot of driver issues originally with vista that gave people cold feet

            4. other misc reasons………….

          • TheMonkeyKing
          • 4 years ago

          That one person who uses Win2K…uhm, that’s me.

        • auxy
        • 4 years ago

        [quote=”cygnus1″<]They don't really care about people though. People aren't really their customers.[/quote<]Yeah, you can say that again. And I know. It's all about that dirty dollar. I'm just saying, this entire mindset that Microsoft has had since the 90s of "we can do whatever we like and you just have to deal with it" is really irritating.

        • rechicero
        • 4 years ago

        There is an easy way for doing that: fixing W10.
        Yes, I know, W8 was worse, but I made the mistake of “upgrading” and the only thing I got was a worse system: worse UI, less stable, slower. Then I thought, whatever, I’ll try a clean install. Now is stable again and not slower (not faster, though), but the crappy UI is there (why do I need my config option in completely different places, why the prompt is not in Accesories, why the startup folder is not in the program list?) and lots of things doesnt work (like the Asus controllers for the case fans, gadgets, etc). Essentially, a change that offers very little useful (yes, the new task manager I like) and takes away some things that were actually usefull. And, of course, is ugly, but that’s just IMO.

        EDIT: And I forgot the forced ms account ID at bootup. I dodged it in the installation and, at some point, it got activated. It’s my home PC, if somebody access that PC without my permission, the problem is much bigger than accessing the PC… I managed to activate a non ID startup, but I shouldnt need to do that. And, of course, the forced upgrades… No, in my experience, W10 just meant more issues. I guess I’ll go back to W7 again in the future…

      • Krogoth
      • 4 years ago

      Windows 7 is going EOL whatever you like it or not. It is going the way of Windows XP. The difference is that Microsoft wants to prevent a repeat of XP => Vista debacle in the enterprise world.

      They really don’t care about mainstream market because they replace their entire computers when comes time to upgrade and use whatever comes with it. The main issue with mainstream market is there isn’t a mainstream killer app that renders systems from a decade ago woefully obsolete. VR isn’t that app and 4K playback is going to be handled by A/V equipment not computers. The masses will stick with 720p/1080p media playback on their computers and portables.

        • bhtooefr
        • 4 years ago

        And, 4k30 media playback can be done by at least Sandy Bridge’s IGP, even if it’s not officially supported. (Technically, Intel didn’t support 4k until Haswell, but I’ve driven a T221 at 34 Hz off of an HD 2000.) So, even that’s not a killer app for buying new hardware for normal users – even with official support, a Haswell tablet could do 4k officially.

        • auxy
        • 4 years ago

        *I* don’t care. I use Windows 10. So don’t come at me with this crap about Windows 7; it’s irrelevant to me.

        It’s their attitude I’m complaining about, not Windows 10.

      • bhtooefr
      • 4 years ago

      Have you tried running Windows XP on Haswell?

      Or Windows 2000 on Sandy Bridge? (That might actually work better than expected by abusing XP drivers, but then it becomes, have you tried running Windows 2000 on Haswell?)

      Or NT 4 on anything newer than about i915? (And even that might be a bit dicey.)

      Or NT 3.51 on anything newer than the 440BX?

      Or NT 3.1/3.50 on anything newer than a Pentium 1?

      You’ll be forced to migrate to new versions with new hardware anyway, Microsoft is just pushing up the time table.

        • Deanjo
        • 4 years ago

        [quote<]Or NT 3.1/3.51 on anything newer than a Pentium 1?[/quote<] Pentium Pro, DEC Alpha and PowerPC.

          • bhtooefr
          • 4 years ago

          That was a typo, I meant to type 3.50 there.

          And, AFAIK, 3.50 refuses to boot on anything with a CPUID of family 6, which includes Pentium Pro.

            • Deanjo
            • 4 years ago

            A simple “hack” of an installation file allowed it to be installed on newer processors like the Pentium Pro. You just had to edit two inf files and replace the cpu string with[quote<] STF_PROCESSOR =$(ProcessorID_I586)[/quote<] It would run just fine then.

        • the
        • 4 years ago

        [quote<]Or NT 3.51 on anything newer than the 440BX?[/quote<] The thing here is that most VM products emulate the 440BX chips on newer hardware. In this context, it would work rather well. Come to think of it, I think have seen NT 4 running inside of a VM during the early days of Core 2 based Xeons.

      • EndlessWaves
      • 4 years ago

      Apple will maybe keep pushing updates to old versions for two years after they release a new one if you’re lucky. I doubt they support new hardware on old versions at all. Try and install anything prior to El Capitan on a newly released mac and it’s not likely to work.

      Ubuntu LTS has five years of support (Windows Seven is nearly 7 years old). I don’t know Ubuntu’s policy on installing old versions on new hardware. If they do so for supported versions then it still falls short of this announcement, where Microsoft has announced Windows 8 support for Skylake extending from five years to six.

      So no, I definitely don’t feel like they’re pushing anyone. It’s unrealistic for a company to continue to support old technology indefinitely and Microsoft already do more than most.

        • the
        • 4 years ago

        This isn’t necessarily true. I know that several Macs released after OS X 10.7 could have OS X 10.6 installed perfectly fine. This a boon for several people as they saw OS X 10.7 as a step backward from OS X 10.6. Thankfully OS X 10.8 rolled around and fixed the problems with OS X 10.8.

      • GatoRat
      • 4 years ago

      I can’t defend Microsoft’s tactics, but the notion that Windows 7 is great is as absurd as all the holdouts for XP when Windows 7 came out. I’m not a fan of all the UI choices in Windows 8 and 10, but both are more stable than Windows 7.

      Interestingly, after using Windows 8 and 10 for a while, when I use Windows 7 (at various jobs) I now find Aero very distracting and turn it off.

        • auxy
        • 4 years ago

        Why are you bringing up Windows 7?

      • GrimDanfango
      • 4 years ago

      Most software developers tend to work on “when” rather than “if” people upgrade to the latest version, as there’s little point supporting something that’s essentially just an out-of-date version of the same thing…
      The issue here is, most developers don’t tend to suddenly change their solid, reasonably secure platform into a telemetry harvesting trojan, and then aggresively push the update on everyone while threatening imminent loss of functionality if you fail to step in line.

      • VincentHanna
      • 4 years ago

      If you want to run an unsecure OS after the supported lifetime ends, more power to you. That’s not MSFTs problem.

      Everyone else WILL be assimilated because that’s what cautious/rational people do. They upgrade, and value tangible security benefits over rumors and conspiracy theories.

        • auxy
        • 4 years ago

        Who said anything about running an older OS? You, like almost everyone else, completely avoided the actual point of my post to spew some pointless garbage about old OSes that nobody was talking about.

          • VincentHanna
          • 4 years ago

          Windows 7 is EOL. MSFT has already discontinued mainstream support and extended support will end in just 3.5 years. It is the definition of an “older OS.” The only “new” OS that MSFT offers is windows 10…

            • auxy
            • 4 years ago

            I never mentioned Windows 7. Why are you bringing it up?

        • NovusBogus
        • 4 years ago

        Sure, but W7 support doesn’t end until 2020. That’s probably at least one CEO and several major strategy changes away, and by then we’ll only barely remember the Windows 10 era.

      • Kretschmer
      • 4 years ago

      “Assimilate” reminded me of this:

      [url<]https://www.penny-arcade.com/comic/2002/07/22[/url<]

    • End User
    • 4 years ago

    Microsoft finally built a version of their Windows 10 update utility that was Skylake compatible.

    • brothergc
    • 4 years ago

    well might just be time to build that windows 7 skylake system ! 😀

    maybe by the time it is due for a upgrage windows 10 will have been replaced !

      • south side sammy
      • 4 years ago

      …….. LOL.

    • LauRoman
    • 4 years ago

    So basically no real adoption of W10 and/or last year’s CPU in the enterprise, right?

      • Whispre
      • 4 years ago

      Wrong. In fact my company just finished moving to Windows 7 last summer, and we’ll be rolling out Windows 10 into production within three months with a plan to have all systems upgraded in 2 years.

      • Buzzard44
      • 4 years ago

      Yeah, W10 is still quite new for that.

      What the heck was Microsoft thinking? Large enterprises aren’t going to switch to a new OS overnight (try several years), and virtually nobody in the enterprise is using 8.

      Did they think that in say, 2018, enterprises would just be buying “new” three-year-old laptops for their employees?

        • bhtooefr
        • 4 years ago

        I’d just like to note that Apple still makes the MD101LL/A. Which is a new three-year-old laptop – it launched at the June 2012 WWDC. Schools still deploy it because of budgetary reasons – it’s the only Mac laptop with RAM slots and a hard drive, so they can incrementally upgrade it as they get budget. (Note that this machine may be discontinued on Monday, and it’s to the point that a $300 Chromebook is probably a better machine, but still.)

        And, my client’s still deploying Precision M4800s – I’ve got a brand new M4800 on my cart ready to deploy, and then another one boxed to deploy later. (Disclaimer, I work for Dell, yada yada yada.) That’s a machine that launched on September 9, 2013. Granted, that one’s largely due to Broadwell-H being delayed to the point that Skylake-H was nearly out, I think, and there’s now a Skylake-H model, but my client hasn’t switched to the new model yet. Because of Broadwell-H being skipped, I could see companies running [i<]five[/i<] year old new workstation-class laptops if they're really avoiding Windows 10. So, in the case of workstation laptops, it doesn't even take avoiding Windows 10 for a three-year-old new laptop to be deployed still, just Intel stagnation.

      • Krogoth
      • 4 years ago

      Pretty much.

      It is Microsoft’s worst fear. By the time enterprise market decides to do next massive major overhaul they may take a serious consideration to *nix solutions.

      • odizzido
      • 4 years ago

      We pretty much just switched to 7 from XP at my workplace. We’re going to be on 7 for 10+ years I bet.

    • south side sammy
    • 4 years ago

    well there you it have, again from the horses mouth in case some of you missed it. What I didn’t read is where Microsoft said they would stop screwing with W7 installs and STOP forcing W10 anything into our updates……………. So maybe now I can buy some newer hardware and not worry about what opsys I want to install on it…???

      • LostCat
      • 4 years ago

      I didn’t read where MS was actually doing that and it wasn’t just hearsay.

      • Deanjo
      • 4 years ago

      I hear ya, last thing I want my father to do is to upgrade to Windows 10. He has a bunch of software and hardware that would be removed and all of a sudden not work due to it being older but perfectly functioning. For example, he still does his books on MS Works spreadsheet which works fine under Windows 7 but is a no go under 10. If he were to upgrade, he would no longer be able to even access those spreadsheets through Excel since it cannot import them (but ironically Works can import Excel spreadsheets, figure that one out). We are talking about decades of farm accounting being threatened with an upgrade.

        • isaacg
        • 4 years ago

        Sounds like it’s not his only issue anyway, but LibreOffice should be able to open and convert them to Excel or OpenDocument Spreadsheet format.

          • Deanjo
          • 4 years ago

          Tried that a couple of years back. Totally messed up the sheets. Even if it did work, it gains him nothing to move to Windows 10 but requires him to invest in a new AIO Printer/Scanner/FAX, search and purchase new software for his LP –> CD setup (if new drivers are even available for it), give up his lottery software that he uses (he’s long time retired and he keeps his brain active doing lottery analysis), completely redoing how he handles his photo’s because his software won’t run on 10, etc.

          Basically it would require him to lose pretty much everything that he has used his computers for the last 30ish years and start fresh. I could probably get most of it running fine on linux and wine but this is not something a 75 year old man wants nor should have to do.

          I can only hope that once MS starts charging for Windows 10 this summer, that they stop trying to force the upgrades and leaves him alone.

            • bhtooefr
            • 4 years ago

            I’m surprised there’s that much that’s just flat-out not working, yet works in 7. (Is UAC disabled on his 7 install, by chance?)

            It looks like Works 9 works on 10586, so there’s that.

            What model is his AIO? (And, if it isn’t supported, I wonder how ink availability is going to be…) Usually, drivers for that kind of thing for even [i<]Vista[/i<] work on 10. What is the software he's using for his LP to CD setup? What is the lottery software that he uses? What software does he use to handle his photos? You're going to have to solve all of these problems by 2020, anyway, or disconnect him from the internet, so...

            • Deanjo
            • 4 years ago

            [quote<]I'm surprised there's that much that's just flat-out not working, yet works in 7. (Is UAC disabled on his 7 install, by chance?)[/quote<] UAC is enabled on his Win 7. [quote<]It looks like Works 9 works on 10586, so there's that.[/quote<] Nope, not even under compatibility mode. [quote<]What model is his AIO? (And, if it isn't supported, I wonder how ink availability is going to be...) Usually, drivers for that kind of thing for even Vista work on 10.[/quote<] It's an older Canon, ink is plentiful and cheap, scanner/fax software won't work under Windows 10 (or 8 for that matter). Canon doesn't plan on upgrading the software. [quote<]What is the software he's using for his LP to CD setup? What is the lottery software that he uses? What software does he use to handle his photos? [/quote<] Mostly software that came with the devices. Specific versions I cannot say at the moment as I am not remotely close to his machine. When we tried to upgrade a ton of it was simply removed from the system. (I'm not kidding on this but some of the lottery software he uses is still on 5 1/4 floppy). Thankfully I have his system doing full disk snapshots regularly and we were able to roll back without issue. [quote<]You're going to have to solve all of these problems by 2020, anyway, or disconnect him from the internet, so...[/quote<] Not really, good AV, proper firewall and him not using IE will keep him going a lot longer. He doesn't do much on the internet other than read the local news and send receive email through thunderbird. A 1.5 Mbit connection (best available in his area) doesn't allow much more.

            • bhtooefr
            • 4 years ago

            I’ll work backwards.

            There’s plenty of vulnerabilities in various components that won’t get patched past end of support, even if he’s using them, that even the best AV hasn’t stopped.

            Lottery software being on 5.25″ floppy indicates that it’s either DOS or Win16. I’m assuming we’re dealing with 32-bit Windows 7. Was the Windows 10 install also 32-bit (if it was an upgrade through GWX, I’d expect it to be 32-bit)? If so, NTVDM may need to be installed manually. If not, yeah, that won’t work (without breaking out DOSBox or DOS in a VM).

            Looks like the MF Toolbox can be installed in Windows 10 with some work and abuse of safe mode: [url<]http://community.usa.canon.com/t5/Office-Printers/MF-Toolbox-doesn-t-work-on-Windows-10/td-p/147893[/url<] How did Works 9 actually fail? I'm finding a lot of reports of it working...

            • Deanjo
            • 4 years ago

            [quote<]There's plenty of vulnerabilities in various components that won't get patched past end of support, even if he's using them, that even the best AV hasn't stopped.[/quote<] Not at all worried about that. Seriously I am not. The chances of him being hit by an old Windows vulnerability are next to none with how he uses the computer. [quote<]Lottery software being on 5.25" floppy indicates that it's either DOS or Win16. I'm assuming we're dealing with 32-bit Windows 7. Was the Windows 10 install also 32-bit (if it was an upgrade through GWX, I'd expect it to be 32-bit)? If so, NTVDM may need to be installed manually. If not, yeah, that won't work (without breaking out DOSBox or DOS in a VM).[/quote<] The stuff on floppy he is already using DOSBox on to run on Windows 7 64-bit. MS office on Win 8 and 10 would fail with a typical windows crash "Send report to MS" on launch.

      • egon
      • 4 years ago

      KB3035583 is the !@#$%!@# devil. Hide it, it comes back. Use tricks meant to block it permanently (for which people shouldn’t have to waste time researching/implementing in the first place), and it [url=http://www.myce.com/news/again-microsoft-becomes-more-aggressive-in-nagging-windows-7-and-8-1-users-to-upgrade-to-windows-10-78345/<]still comes back[/url<] .

        • LostCat
        • 4 years ago

        Probably because they keep changing it, and that’s how changed updates work.

        • isaacg
        • 4 years ago

        [url<]http://ultimateoutsider.com/downloads/[/url<] GWX Control Panel nukes and blocks it and has an optional monitoring mode and regular updates to keep it that way.

        • bhtooefr
        • 4 years ago

        Citation needed on KB3035583 actually ignoring the registry edit when done properly.

        I’ve seen sufficient citation that people have gotten automatic pushes to Windows 10, but I need more than that to believe it.

      • HERETIC
      • 4 years ago

      MS No’s must be down for the month-
      [url<]http://www.myce.com/news/microsoft-caug[/url<] ... ent-78844/ Microsoft denies that Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 computers are updated to Windows 10 without users consent. If Microsoft is right, it’s unclear how it’s possible that so many users feel their computers are upgraded to Windows 10 without their consent. It’s possible the way the upgrade is presented was unclear to a large group of users. YOU MUST UPGRADE-YOU MUST UPGRADE-YOU MUST UPGRADE.

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This