Renice X9 RSATA SSD packs a resilient 2TB of storage

Anybody who's ever busted the delicate plastic shroud on a SATA power or data connector will appreciate Shenzen Renice Technology's X9 RSATA 2TB SSD. Unlike measly consumer-class drives, the X9 uses connectors that Renice calls Rugged SATA, or RSATA. That connector doesn't appear to be an industry standard, but the company claims the beefed-up plugs can prevent intermittent contact caused by shock and vibration.

Reinforced ports aside, the X9 uses Renice's own RS3502-IT controller to manage its 2TB of MLC flash. This controller can also run the drive in a pseudo-SLC mode for greater endurance and performance. The regular X9 SSD claims 530MB/s sequential read performance and 500MB/s sequential writes, though the company doesn't specify random I/O performance.

The company also says the drive uses powerful, low-leakage capacitors to ensure data transfers in progress are completed in the event of a power loss. Renice suggests that interested buyers contact it for a quote, so we suspect this puppy doesn't come cheap.

Comments closed
    • chµck
    • 4 years ago

    [quote<]the beefed-up plugs can prevent intermittent contact caused by shock and vibration[/quote<] has anyone encountered this issue?

      • Ikepuska
      • 4 years ago

      Yup, on rotary wing aircraft.

    • extide
    • 4 years ago

    So, how is this supposed to work, they must supply an adapter of some sort, or maybe they suppy a cable with that weird connector on one end, and then a regular sata port on the other which would go to the mobo. For the power, they would have to supply an adapter, probably to regular molex as those are more durable.

    Also, I have never heard of these guys and they have their own controller, very interesting. Would love to see it reviewed!

      • DPete27
      • 4 years ago

      Unless this is supposed to be an external SSD, this is idiotic.

        • UnfriendlyFire
        • 4 years ago

        I’m sure a cheaper option would be to use tape for internal drives. Or add shock/vibration absorber pads. Or modify the cable arrangements so they’re less likely to get yanked out.

    • Duct Tape Dude
    • 4 years ago

    Rugged SATA? Guys I have an idea: [b<]D-Sub SATA[/b<]. Don't forget the screws.

      • willmore
      • 4 years ago

      If only you could get SATA cables with little clips on them…. </s>

      • juzz86
      • 4 years ago

      It was developed for the Military. Specifically, field comms and aircraft. It has been around for a little while, since at least SATA II. It seemed to gain more traction with SSDs. The rubber boot surround is supposed to boost dust and moisture ingress protection to the pins, which are circular in RSATA.

      I have two industrial machines here which use it in their drive bays. It makes changing drives a lot easier as a caddy isn’t used – the connector can take the weight of the drive by itself.

        • Duct Tape Dude
        • 4 years ago

        Interesting, thanks for the perspective. Out of curiosity, did such things exist for spinning drives, or is this a recent development due to the advent of SSDs?

          • juzz86
          • 4 years ago

          No worries. I was also very surprised to see R-SATA featuring on an enthusiast website 🙂

          I know the machines we have originally shipped with ~5GB hard drives installed, so I assume it was used for mechanical storage – albeit probably in niche usage circumstances.

          The (20GB) SSD replacements we have are SLC, so again older stuff. Our machinery doesn’t require much in terms of storage bandwidth, although we got a very noticeable boost in boot-up times when swapping out (I only remember because the Production Manager at the time shouted me a six-pack, lol).

            • Duct Tape Dude
            • 4 years ago

            Depending on the year, 5GB hard drives sound suspiciously like the microdrives found in iPods and other MP3 players of days past (those 1.8″ drives the size of a CF card). Probably the most rugged spinning drives available.

            Cool to hear about standardized military tech. Thanks again!

            • juzz86
            • 4 years ago

            I suspect you’re correct mate 🙂

            Although they’re not a 1.8 inch form factor, they’re definitely not heavy – probably Microdrive internals in a 2.5 inch housing.

            No worries!

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