Corsair M65 Pro RGB mouse sees with a 12,000-DPI optical eye

Corsair's ever-expanding lineup of gaming mice has just welcomed a new member into its fold. Say hello to the M65 Pro RGB, which the company describes as its "highest DPI ever" mouse. That particular boast comes by way of the M65 Pro RGB's optical sensor, a sensitive bit of hardware with a whopping 12,000 DPI resolution—just the ticket for those 1440° no-scope kills. The sensor's surface-detection algorithm is configurable within Corsair's CUE utility, which also controls the mouse's three-zone RGB LED lighting and macro-recording functions.

 

As is the case with most of Corsair's mouse lineup, the M65 Pro RGB has an aluminum underbelly with three separate spots for applying tuning weights. This feature allows players to tweak the mouse's center of gravity to their liking. Eight programmable buttons dot the surface of the mouse, and the main clickers use Omron switches claimed to last for 20 million clicks. One of the side buttons is a dedicated "sniper" unit that lowers the mouse's DPI on-demand.

The Corsair M65 Pro RGB comes in black or white finishes. The black version is available in stores now for $60—a fair price for a high-end gaming mouse. As for the white rodent, Corsair says it'll come out of its cage next month.

Comments closed
    • ronch
    • 4 years ago

    I’m not really much for blingy expensive input devices. I don’t go for uber cheap products but I think a $5 Logitech mouse and a $10 Logitech keyboard work well enough.

    • Krogoth
    • 4 years ago

    Just another overpriced gimmicky peripheral geared towards “PC gamers” who think bigger numbers = better! and bling bling is the way to go.

    Thanks, but I’ll pass.

    • Umbral
    • 4 years ago

    I don’t play SWTOR much anymore, but this mouse in that game would be pure comedy!

    • Laykun
    • 4 years ago

    Hmm, still rockin’ the Logitech MX518, still not seeing compelling reasons to upgrade my mouse.

      • killadark
      • 4 years ago

      My g9x which i got for a throw away price of 15$ 5 years ago still kicking ass even after all the times it has fallen so no new mouse needed ๐Ÿ˜€

    • ronch
    • 4 years ago

    Keyboards with 16.7 million backlighting colors, cases that are comprised of a thousand parts that you need to put together, mice with a bajillion DPI. Yeah maybe there’s a market for these things but… WTH.

      • south side sammy
      • 4 years ago

      say that again when you have to “drag” your mouse across a 34″ or wider high res monitor, especially playing a fps. DPI makes a difference.

        • Welch
        • 4 years ago

        #DPIMatters

          • Bomber
          • 4 years ago

          DPI envy is a thing you know!

        • travbrad
        • 4 years ago

        The same thing could be accomplished by just adjusting your sensitivity in Windows or in-game though (and it has to be said most of the “pro” FPS gamers use very low sensitivity settings with giant mousepads anyway). I have strong doubts about whether mouse DPI makes any difference at all to PRECISION past a certain point.

        I used a 400dpi mouse in a CAL-M Counter-Strike clan and did pretty well with it. Over the years I’ve had a 400dpi, 1200dpi, 8200dpi, and 6500dpi mouse. The only ones I think I could actually tell the difference between was 400 vs 1200 (and even that could have been placebo).

        DPI switching is nice to have though, and these days if you want a quality comfortable mouse with DPI switching you pretty much have to get one of these crazy high DPI mice.

          • south side sammy
          • 4 years ago

          There are times when the windows settings are enough or almost enough. then there are times when you need to boost it through the mouses software. this even happens at 1900 res. I see this moving from machine to machine. Perhaps the hardware has a significant role in it? And maybe the operating systems? I have at least one of each… ( NOT10 )……….yet.
          true, 12000 is insane but think of those guys on the International Space Station that need to drag their mouse from the Earth to the Moon…. lol

        • auxy
        • 4 years ago

        Sure it does! But 12,000 is ludicrous. My Corsair M95 supports up to 8200 DPI and even this is completely insane. Most games’ sensitivity settings don’t even go low enough to make this DPI setting make sense.

        Most pro gamers prefer DPI settings in the 1200-2400 range. This allows for extremely accurate tracking during fast movements while still maintaining a high degree of sensitivity.

        By the way, you (and everyone else reading this should hit [url=http://www.funender.com/quake/mouse/index.html<]this[/url<] link to learn a few things about mouse sensitivity and performance. This is a copy of an older page that was intended for Quake 3, but a lot of the wisdom here is relevant to any FPS game. (ยดใƒปฯ‰ใƒป๏ฝ€)

          • synthtel2
          • 4 years ago

          s/1200-2400/400-800? FWIW I have some friends who are pretty into Counter-strike, and among that group 400 and (more often) 800 seem to be standard, and they look a bit funny at anyone using more than 1600. At the sensitivity settings and resolutions they use, this is still enough for pixel-perfect precision.

        • synthtel2
        • 4 years ago

        3840 pixels at 12000 CPI is 1/3rd of an inch to move all the way across a 4K monitor at 1:1, and most people use acceleration, which will make that distance even smaller. In a game with 90 degree FoV at 4K, that’s still 1.3 inches / 3.25 cm per 360 while maintaining pixel-perfect precision. There are people who play with sensitivity that high, but it takes special kinesiology to be even OK at that level. Competitive gamers tend to be more in the 20-40 cm per 360 range, and most people don’t have 4K monitors. (I’ve continually found I’m better with lower sensitivity than I think – I use ~28 cm/360 now, and would probably go even further if I had a bigger mousepad.)

        To be fair to Logitech (and Corsair if this is actually the PMW3366), the 12000 CPI sensor in question is actually among the best around in all ways. It wouldn’t make much difference to me because I only use 800 CPI, but the PMW3310 I use (the gold standard gaming sensor) starts to feel a bit sketchy at 3200 CPI (spec is 5000). There are people (occasionally) who actually do have a use for 3200 CPI, and the ADNS-9800 (or anything laser) isn’t much of an option if linearity is a top concern. The PMW3366 is an optical sensor that’s still flawless at 5000+ CPI, AFAIK the only one.

          • Firestarter
          • 4 years ago

          in an FPS, you’d want subpixel precision though. Not that that would change your argument much if at all

            • synthtel2
            • 4 years ago

            The real question is whether you’re better off with (a) the diminishing returns from subpixel precision in-game or (b) the diminishing returns from running the sensor further below spec and getting the extra determinism at that level. The correct answer probably depends on the game and player, but I myself lean towards (b). With the PMW3366, you don’t have to choose. ๐Ÿ˜€

        • ronch
        • 4 years ago

        Well, I’d burn my eyes sitting a foot away from a 34″ monitor. And having bad eyesight, sitting 5 feet away even from such a display will make it difficult for me to make out anything on it. So, ~22″ is fine.

          • south side sammy
          • 4 years ago

          yup, old age is a bummer. I messed with that “virtual” high res stuff mixed into the graphics cards these days last night. Can’t see anything on the screen…….LOL……… and it didn’t make the games look any better ( like you were actually sitting in front of a 4k monitor ) but it sure played slow and jerky like you were. ( some of this nitwits on the net that put up videos on this saying how great it is…… )……. but you do need to boost the cursor rate that high.
          I want to get rid of my everyday driver ( 1920×1200 ) but am afraid of making a mistake. There’s no way I could surf or write or read on a 4k day in and day out. It’s okay for picture/graphics/film and gaming if you don’t need to read…. but………

        • Krogoth
        • 4 years ago

        “Extreme” DPI mice are just marketing non-sense.

        The human hand and forearm does not possess the dexterity to take advantage of such sensors.

        The feet of the mice and the surface they glide across make a far greater impact on the speed and accuracy of your input. Sensors haven’t matter since second-generation optical mice.

          • synthtel2
          • 4 years ago

          The peak CPI doesn’t really matter, but there is still a bit of useful progress in sensors (for a few people). The example from a bit longer ago was that some people could hit the max perfect tracking speed on the 3090, and the 3310 fixed that. Some people (with very long sarcomeres in the relevant muscles, I guess?) can actually use enough CPI (3000-5000) that the 3310 starts to get meh, in which case the 3366 is definitely nicer than anything laser. Anything supposed to work on glass still needs work, because collimation inherently messes with high-speed tracking, but is pretty much required for glass.

            • Krogoth
            • 4 years ago

            People keep forgetting that mouse at heart is a peripheral that requires physical input.

            The surface it glides across and surface area of the “Telfon” feet are far more important factors in tracking speed and accuracy than the sensor itself. Ergonomics plays an important role as well especially if you want go on a gaming marathon.

            Latency is only an issue with the USB controllers (mouse and computer) not with the sensor unless you got a first generation optical mouse.

            Most progamers use mice that are equipped with sensors that have rather modest specs. They look for mice that are more focused on ergonomics and programmable buttons.

            • synthtel2
            • 4 years ago

            Yes, characteristics other than sensors matter more at this point, but you claimed that sensors don’t matter at all, which just isn’t true.

    • Firestarter
    • 4 years ago

    [quote<]Logitech uses a 12,000-DPI PMW3366 optical sensor[/quote<] same sensor here perhaps?

      • synthtel2
      • 4 years ago

      I sure hope so. The PMW3366 might be the best sensor in any mouse, and so far Logitech has had a monopoly on it.

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