Razer’s Ripsaw capture box makes streaming a breeze

Game streaming is bigger than ever, but all that video encoding is hard on a processor. Gamers playing on weaker machines, like your typical store-bought laptop or game console, may find that their rig isn't up to the task of streaming HD video. For most, the easiest solution to this conundrum is to use a dedicated video capture device like Razer's new Ripsaw.

Front and rear views of the Ripsaw

This little USB 3.0-powered box sports HDMI input and passthrough. Console gamers can hook up component video and dual-RCA analog audio inputs using an included adapter. The Ripsaw can also mix in two 3.5mm audio sources for the live-streamers out there. The device can capture 1080p video sources at up to 60 frames per second. The device is officially supported for use with Open Broadcaster Software and XSplit Broadcaster, and it requires Razer's Synapse application, as well. Gamers looking to do some capturing on easy-mode can pick up the Ripsaw right now for $179.99.

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    • Forge
    • 4 years ago

    I just built my new local Netflix with my tax return this year. 10 4TB disks in RAID6 for 32TB usable space, on a nice Supermicro/Xeon setup with 32GB of ram, full IPMI, the works. Total cost was about 3K$ and I own the media on it completely. More than 50% of the cost was the disks, too.

    Expensive? Sure. It’s serving 4K media to my new TV via the HTPC in front of it, though, and I can’t be expired by a cable provider or movie studio. Works for me.

      • VoodooIT
      • 4 years ago

      Haha that’s fantastic, but what the hell does that have to do with this Razer capture device?

    • Deanjo
    • 4 years ago

    Looks like a rebrand of a device that has been available on Aliexpress for ages.

      • NTMBK
      • 4 years ago

      Sounds like Razer alright.

      • rei
      • 4 years ago

      What is the link to that device?

        • Deanjo
        • 4 years ago

        There are a bunch of them.

        [url<]http://www.aliexpress.com/category/200002344/video-tv-tuner-cards.html?spm=2114.10010108.100004.5.AzXBYK[/url<]

    • atari030
    • 4 years ago

    Pretty cool. But I find the Howe & Howe Ripsaw more compelling – [url<]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9-9uzLBtMtY[/url<]

    • cmrcmk
    • 4 years ago

    Probably a silly question but could this capture bluray video playback?

      • xeridea
      • 4 years ago

      No, the all powerful MPAA would not let that happen. Blu-ray must be sent encrypted over the wire, though there are some devices that break the rule, and work until the MPAA finds out. You can download the free while perpetually in beta MakeMKV to strip the encryption, and Handbrake to reencode to a sensible bitrate if you want.

      More info on the HDMI encryption…
      [url<]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High-bandwidth_Digital_Content_Protection[/url<] It, like all media encryption schemes, has been broken, and they keep needing to make new versions to try to stay ahead. 4K Blurays demand the latest version be used. Another note on 4k BluRay, if you want 4k, you must have an internet connection to watch it.

        • NTMBK
        • 4 years ago

        [quote<]Another note on 4k BluRay, if you want 4k, you must have an internet connection to watch it.[/quote<] It's like they're trying to kill their last remaining sales. 0_o If I wanted something which required internet access, I would just watch freaking 4K Netflix. And of course when they inevitably shut down the servers in ~10 years, what happens to all those films I bought?

          • cygnus1
          • 4 years ago

          [quote<] And of course when they inevitably shut down the servers in ~10 years, what happens to all those films I bought? [/quote<] If you're the average consumer, you buy them again in whatever the new format is. If you're smart, you rip them to unencrypted files using decryption tools that invariably come along.

          • hansmuff
          • 4 years ago

          It grinds my gears how these “purchase” options are presented by cable co’s. I mean you’re buying one thing, a permanent access token to THEIR library. I hate this so much. Ugh.

            • DPete27
            • 4 years ago

            “Sir, are you SURE you want to cancel your service? You’ll lose all the movies you’ve purchased.” [Evil face]

          • xeridea
          • 4 years ago

          You can watch the 4K BluRay in 1080p, which should be fine, it is the the concept of it and the general nature of the MPAA and RIAA that is infuriating. I can guarantee the 4K BluRays will show up in the torrents soon after release for those that don’t want to buy them.

        • Deanjo
        • 4 years ago

        [quote<]No, the all powerful MPAA would not let that happen. [/quote<] In the States that is.... [quote<]though there are some devices that break the rule, and work until the MPAA finds out[/quote<] Not without breaking a ton of existing legitimate Bluray players out there. There are also devices out there that are in compliance but use a legal loophole to get around it.

          • xeridea
          • 4 years ago

          I thought they had some way of revoking access to the devices by manufacture ID or something, but I don’t remember specifics from what I have read about it. I know they do this on BluRay drives and players. They decided my drive in my computer isn’t valid anymore.

            • Deanjo
            • 4 years ago

            [quote<]I thought they had some way of revoking access to the devices by manufacture ID[/quote<] There is, however, most (if not all now days) of those HDCP bypass devices identify themselves as one of the many HDCP compliant devices. To revoke would mean disabling the legit devices as well. Also a few of them are re-programmable so if they revoke, the user just flashes with a new one.

            • DoomGuy64
            • 4 years ago

            What I love with this is how PowerDVD uses this as an excuse to force users to buy upgrades every year to get full bluray compliance.

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