Windows 10’s Anniversary Update arrives this summer

Microsoft's Build 2016 developer conference kicked off today in San Francisco with the announcement that Windows 10 has reached 270 million installs. That apparently makes Windows 10's adoption rate the fastest of any Windows version to date. The company also says its operating system will be receiving its next large update, called the Anniversary Update, this summer.

Microsoft is making a host of improvements in this update. The biggest changes will be coming to the Windows Store, which is being fully integrated across the company's Windows and Xbox platforms. Phil Spencer was on hand to announce that all of Microsoft's forthcoming games will be coming to both Windows 10 and the Xbox. To drive the point home, he showcased Forza Motorsport 6: Apex running in its full PC-version glory. That DirectX 12 title is just one game that showcases what Spencer described as the fastest-adopted DirectX release the company has ever made.

Spencer says the company will let UWP apps disable vsync and use FreeSync or G-Sync in the Anniversary Update. Spencer also promises more improvements for PC gamers in the future, including multi-GPU support, mods, and display overlays, although no timeframe was given for these changes.

Project Centennial—a Win32-to-UWP converter—was showcased using Age of Empires II HD and The Witcher 3. Microsoft says the apps generated by Centennial's Desktop App Converter are "modern desktop apps" that can be sold in the Windows store. They have all the benefits of natively developed UWP apps, like the overlay and recording features from the Xbox Gaming app, along with improved security and, according to Spencer, improved performance.

In a surprising announcement, Microsoft showed off a new, as-yet-unnamed Windows subsystem that allows native Linux binaries  to run on Windows with native filesystem support. Kevin Gallo, Microsoft's corporate vice president of Windows, demonstrated popular unix shell bash running natively on Windows 10. From there, he also showed off a Ubuntu Linux binary of it-does-everything editor emacs. Gallo also says the Anniversary Update will include a Windows kernel module that allows access to the Linux kernel API.

The company showcased further improvements to usability, as well. Windows Hello now integrates with the Edge browser, which allows websites and web apps to make use of biometrics and physical two-factor authentication using the FIDO standard. Windows Ink—Microsoft's API for cross-application screen drawing and advanced pen input—is getting a major facelift in the Anniversary update with a new feature called the Ink Workspace. This utility allows for quick access to pen-compatible apps installed on the system, and it also includes lower-level features like software ruler support and deep pen integration with UWP apps. Cortana integration with pen input is coming, as well. When Microsoft's executive demo lead, Bryan Roper, jotted "call mom tomorrow" on a virtual sticky note, Cortana popped up to note that it had automatically made a reminder.

Speaking of everyone's favorite virtual assistant, Cortana will get deeper integration with more than just Windows soon. Outlook will soon allow Cortana to create appointments and read your e-mails to you. Microsoft hopes people will feel comfortable using vague voice commands like "Send Chuck the PowerPoint that I worked on last night," and it's currently running an invite-based preview for developers to experiment with deep Cortana integration.

Comments closed
    • MOSFET
    • 3 years ago

    270 million installations definitely does not equal 270 million [b<]current[/b<] installations. I've probably installed Win10 over 100 times since last summer, and probably over 200 times including beta. Well over half were virtual instances, and over 90% of those are no longer around. Of the physical installations, [b<]one[/b<] remains.

    • ronch
    • 3 years ago

    Not touching Windows 10. Thanks.

      • Deanjo
      • 3 years ago

      And microsoft thanks you for not being a softwarephile.

    • Deanjo
    • 3 years ago

    I wonder if MS will allow Samba being ran on it considering it does not artificially limit the concurrent connections that MS relies on to upsell it’s higher end versions of server and CALS.

    • torquer
    • 3 years ago

    Blah blah blah M$ blah blah monopoly blah blah *clings to ancient OS* blah blah *pretends that SteamOS/Linux/OSX are viable alternatives for gamers* blah blah

    There, just saved you reading 90% of the comments on this story on any tech site out there.

    You’re welcome.

      • BIF
      • 3 years ago

      I don’t get your point.

      I’m looking forward to the upgrade. There’s no need to be angry and sad!

      • synthtel2
      • 3 years ago

      Didn’t I already counter-rant this? Got some deja-vu there.

      Anyway, I only refer to MS as M$ when they’re charging to remove ads from Solitaire (and I would do the same to anyone who tries to pull such shenanigans), they’re not so monopolistic right now but they have a bad history of that and I’m slow to forgive companies for such things, Win7 is genuinely better than Win10 for some people (nobody’s forcing you to use it), and I do actually do my gaming on Linux (but you shouldn’t if you don’t want to).

    • Thagarr
    • 3 years ago

    “Microsoft is making a host of improvements in this update. The biggest changes will be coming to the Windows Store, which is being fully integrated across the company’s Windows and Xbox platforms.”

    So the biggest changes to the Windows 10 operating system is to integrate the Windows store more deeply on PC and Xbox? How exactly is trying to force me to buy stuff from a proprietary “store” that I have absolutely no interest in a change that I would want?

    Deeper Cortana integration? No thanks, it is integrated far to deeply now!

    Reading the Linux file system is certainly an improvement, but why would I possibly want the ability to run Linux binaries on Windows, when I can run them natively on Linux without all the Microsoft bloat and spyware?

    And as others have pointed out, it is easy to pad your install numbers when your forcing installs against peoples wishes. My computer is exactly that, MY computer! In the future it will be running Linux exclusively.

    • TheMonkeyKing
    • 3 years ago

    RE: “…new, as-yet-unnamed Windows subsystem that allows native Linux binaries to run on Windows with native filesystem support”

    Linux to Windows –> WINE = Wine Is Not an Emulator
    Windows to Linux –> MEAD = Microsoft Eliminates All Distros

      • BIF
      • 3 years ago

      Okay, now that was funny.

    • Peter.Parker
    • 3 years ago

    [quote<]... as-yet-unnamed Windows subsystem that allows native Linux binaries to run on Windows with native filesystem support [/quote<] Sounds to me like the Microsoft answer to the WINE library on Linux. I guess, if we must name it, we should keep with the alcoholic drinks theme. Off the top of my head, I propose: -TEQUILA (TEdious QUasi Impossible Linux Attempt) Or maybe name it as some cocktails: -Cuba Libre ('cause "libre" means free ) -Appletini ('cause maybe Apple will feel like Microsoft is making a move on them ) -Screwdriver (it will definitely do something to the drivers) -Mint Julep (Linux Mint is the most popular Linux distro, at least this will turn some heads) -Cosmopolitan ( well, try to mix things up) and finally, inspired by the "S*x on the Beach" cocktail, we could call it - N*x on the b*tch

      • BIF
      • 3 years ago

      [quote<]"...and finally, inspired by the "S*x on the Beach" cocktail, we could call it - N*x on the b*tch"... [/quote<] Oh, I vote for this!

    • DavidC1
    • 3 years ago

    I can’t get myself to install this OS. Unless you need to play latest games, you don’t need it. I actually prefer Windows 8.1 to 10 on my touch enabled laptop. Sure I can install 10 and enable touch interface to be just like 8.1. But why? It’s a waste of time. And it does the exact same thing.

    Really I think I moved beyond the point where upgrading mattered. Those that care lie with gamers and media center enthusiasts. The rest? Hardly.

    For me I’d like to see a more revolutionary change. Bring on 2nd generation Optane(XPoint) DIMM computer that unifies storage and memory, with OS and programs tailored to take full advantage of the much different memory architecture. I’m talking about getting rid of stupid things like various sleep modes because Optane DIMMs allow near instant cold boot times. All storage based wait times gone. No loading time.

    • Major-Failure
    • 3 years ago

    I feel like it’s groundhog day all over again.

    Back when everyone was already on Vista and complaining about how “bad” it was, my brother and I were still running XP on our machines.

    It’s been the same story with Win 8, Win 9.10, and now this update, while were still running Windows 7.

    • kuttan
    • 3 years ago

    When will the users have a stable finished version of Windows 10 just like that of Windows 7, 8.1 etc ?? As of now Window 10 feels like beta OS with various things broken where some get fixed some new get broken, this cycle of fixing and broken been happening with Windows 10 since its release. Windows 10 seems to be MS product having worst software quality assurance aspect where the software is still broken here and there in addition to privacy concerns and inconfigurable auto update feature. Does MS really serious with its customers ?

    • Krogoth
    • 3 years ago

    Here comes Windows Store 2.0!

    It was a foregone conclusion as soon as etailers and online portals started to take over B&M stores.

    The *nix support is just a preemptive move by Microsoft to stave off *nix’s implementing encroachment in the enterprise and SMB spaces.

      • w76
      • 3 years ago

      Step 1: Create the Store.
      Step 2: Pull everything possible in to the Store.
      Step 3: Make installing outside the Store irritating; think “Sideloading” from phones.
      Step 4: Claim sideloaded apps are inherent security risks, make sideloading require activating “developer mode” or equivalent.
      Step 5: Erect wall around Store, end sideloading entirely for non-Pro/Enterprise SKUs.
      Step 6: Fortify wall, fight the barbarians trying to “root” their OS.
      Step 7: (Monopolist) Profit

      We’re at Step 2 now that we’ve got this Win32 converter.

        • [+Duracell-]
        • 3 years ago

        But Android is at step 4 (and 6 in certain cases) and Apple is definitely at 6. So theoretically, Microsoft is less evil at the moment…?

          • w76
          • 3 years ago

          Do we have to choose between Lucifer, Beelzebub and Abaddon? What was wrong with how it Windows handled it from day 1 until the modern day, or with how linux distros handle it? The way they handle it could use immense polish, but the idea of repo’s and the OS itself not really caring where they come from or even how you manage it all is nice.

          I do think if any one linux distro can get it together Microsoft has been creating a big opening for them, but the nature of open-source… I don’t see the source of the profit motive in anyone investing the necessary resources, except Valve’s motivation and they aren’t progressing very quick (and aren’t even focusing on a desktop experience).

    • yogibbear
    • 3 years ago

    Honestly the Windows 10 Store sounds like garbage. Every single thing that they marketing speak to make it sound good is either 1. only good for MS and not the consumer, or 2. probably a lie / doesn’t require Windows 10 Store to actually implement and is only done so for arbitrary reasons.

      • sweatshopking
      • 3 years ago

      Buy a game once and play on your pc, phone, or xbone? What’s garbage about that?

        • Crackhead Johny
        • 3 years ago

        The “Buy a game once” part is what people do not trust. If you hold the media you should be good.
        If someone else sells you a digital version.. Well lets ask the DIVX, Nook, etc owners how that is working out.
        Microsoft like Steam is a pretty good bet on surviving. Microsoft is a worse bet when it comes to “Will there be a change that requires repurchase?”

        • HisDivineOrder
        • 3 years ago

        I own Gears of War Ultimate Edition on Xbox One. Where’s my free copy for my PC?

          • LostCat
          • 3 years ago

          Sadly they’re still working on crossbuy, but Phil said it’s for all titles in the future.

          • albundy
          • 3 years ago

          yarrrr, arn’t they all?

        • spugm1r3
        • 3 years ago

        While this sounds good (omitting the fact that it likely means every game is a port to the PC), I see this one being met by a lot of resistance from the industry in general, and the FTC specifically. The industry backlash will be due to being forced to play to the lowest common denominator for greatest audience impact. The FTC concerns will be due to the logical next step for Microsoft, that the store will be the only place you are allowed to buy games for your Windows devices.

      • w76
      • 3 years ago

      Only good thing I read was mod support. Obviously mods shouldn’t and generally don’t require app store support, but Steam’s implementation (when games use it) is pretty nice. Takes all the hassle away from using mods. Just a few clicks, and you’ve got your mod downloaded, installed and active. Of course, leave it up to MS to take a great idea and deploy the worst implementation imaginable by mankind.

      • Sabresiberian
      • 3 years ago

      Been awhile since I ran Linux (Ubuntu), but I recall a store-like system that managed most of the available Linux software that you might want to download and use. Not sure Microsoft’s store is significantly different.

        • spugm1r3
        • 3 years ago

        Ubuntu’s “store” front is essentially a GUI on apt-get. For Ubuntu, it’s part of an effort to mainstream Linux for the non-command line literate. It is less about monetization, and more about making it easier to embrace Ubuntu.

        The Windows store, on the other hand, is a bit like the Walmart of digital content delivery. You buy, for instance, the new Tomb Raider, thinking you bought the new Tomb Raider in all it’s visual glory. What you have actually purchased, however, is dumbed-down version with a bunch of knobs that exist, but don’t actually do anything to alter your output. But hey, at least the stills on the advertisement look the same.

        EDIT: For the linux nerds, I know that is oversimplification. Just run with it.

    • PenGun
    • 3 years ago

    Damn, I could almost use windose, instead of just for games, if the Midnight Commander would run well.

    • DrCR
    • 3 years ago

    Go home Microsoft, your drunk.

    Seriously though, Microsoft is absolutely baffling right now.

    • albundy
    • 3 years ago

    you mean unauthorized installs. i’ve had people at work flying off the wall, and literally yelling at the IT staff when their win7 pro was gone off of their laptops. it was hysterical! MS deserves a slowly increasing clap for pulling off this nonsense without consequence.

      • _ppi
      • 3 years ago

      Hire better IT staff, or get entreprise license, this should not have happened. Unless IT wanted the upgrade.

      Besides, the only real visible change between Win7 and Win10 after update is that the bottom toolbar is black, instead of blue. Ok, WiFi has a new icon, but still …

    • anotherengineer
    • 3 years ago

    “announcement that Windows 10 has reached 270 million installs”

    I wonder how many of those were known and how many were slipped in through windows update??

    “That apparently makes Windows 10’s adoption rate the fastest of any Windows version to date.”

    Well if it’s free and forced through windows update I would hope so.

      • cygnus1
      • 3 years ago

      Forced? I literally know no one that that’s happened to. It is very much urban legend. Yes, it will download it, but it still requires user action to actually install…

        • RAGEPRO
        • 3 years ago

        I will testify that I have seen Windows 10 install itself without prompting. Microsoft said it was an error and it only happened on one weekend, but it did actually happen to some folks.

        • Major-Failure
        • 3 years ago

        Let’s just say most users are not tech-savvy enough to know what’s asked of them and mistake it for a “normal” update.

          • cygnus1
          • 3 years ago

          If my grandmother can manage to not have it happen to her, it’s not non-tech-savvy, it’s morons and liars. I just don’t trust the anecdotal internet saying it happened.

          People clicked accept and just didn’t pay attention. It’s not some conspiracy and they’re very much a very small, vocal minority of users.

        • anotherengineer
        • 3 years ago

        Exactly, and it pops up would you like to update windows and most users have no clue and click yes because they have been clicking yes to windows updates forever. This biggest thing used to be a service pack, this is the first time a whole OS was pushed as a free windows update. Also when updates are set to auto-install stuff happens.

        Now if there was a big exclamation and warning before hand saying this update/upgrade to Windows 10 will change your OS completely and you could possibly run into issues do you accept those risks and wish to continue?? But there is not.

        Happened to my dad, brother and uncle. Uncle had a HD4850 which isn’t supported and his machine went wonky.

        • cphite
        • 3 years ago

        I know two people personally who’ve gotten the upgrade installed without action on their part, and there have been plenty of cases reported. It’s not *supposed* to happen but it has.

        Granted, to your point, it’s not happening enough to skew the numbers; but to say it’s not happening is incorrect.

        • Crackhead Johny
        • 3 years ago

        It happened and it made the news. Of course it failed if you didn’t click through the EULA screen.

          • cygnus1
          • 3 years ago

          That was my point. Clicking accept on a very non-standard looking update installer is a positive action required by the user. It never happened automatically. That step is required for the installer to continue.

      • faramir
      • 3 years ago

      I contributed three installations to the number above while attempting to test W10 TP. Two installations on bare metal (Athlon X2 6000+) failed in an endless BSOD loop, one installation on VM (VirtualBox) completed, only to have basic elements of the UI such as screen-resolution-changing applet crash with a system fault.

      Needless to say, out of these three installations I’m *NOT* running W10 on *ANY* machine so Microsoft can take their wonderful W10 installation count figure and stuff it somewhere deep.

        • w76
        • 3 years ago

        The technical preview? To pretend that’s representative of the state of the OS today is a little disingenuous. Also, Athlon X2 6000+? 9 year old computer, legacy hardware much? Can’t expect perfect behavior on every system going back to the 386.

        • cygnus1
        • 3 years ago

        These athlons running win8.1 ok? You installed from scratch or upgrade? This virtual box install of yours, is it up to date and running on a modern enough host?

      • HisDivineOrder
      • 3 years ago

      Don’t forget also that many of the new installs post-November were Xbox One and its updated OS counted as a Windows 10 upgrade.

    • DoomGuy64
    • 3 years ago

    [quote<]Cortana will get deeper integration with more than just Windows[/quote<] What if I disabled Cortana? Hulu already gives me popup warnings. Will further integration make windows apps an all or nothing affair? Because I'll certainly go the nothing route if Microsoft doesn't play fair.

    • Laykun
    • 3 years ago

    Next anniversary : run KDE as you Windows desktop manager!

      • Deanjo
      • 3 years ago

      Ummm…

      [url<]https://windows.kde.org[/url<]

        • Laykun
        • 3 years ago

        That’s for KDE applications, not the desktop environment. And it’s also for building KDE apps for windows, not running KDE linux binaries on windows.

          • bjm
          • 3 years ago

          You can manually launch the Plasma desktop environment with KDE on Windows.

          • Deanjo
          • 3 years ago

          As bjm mentioned, you can launch the Plasma de manually (or add it to your Startup menu item).

            • Laykun
            • 3 years ago

            Holy shit, I gotta try this, I love plasma.

            • Deanjo
            • 3 years ago

            [url<]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L3CSwR3CrsQ&sns=em[/url<] ;D

    • Stargazer
    • 3 years ago

    Huh. Imagine that.

    2016 actually *is* The Year of Linux on the Desktop

    (sort of)

      • Beahmont
      • 3 years ago

      Considering that this is really not what anyone who uses that phrase had in mind, I suppose the moral here is:

      Be careful what you wish for; you just might get it.

      • BIF
      • 3 years ago

      I don’t understand what either of you just said.

      No, really; please explain.

        • synthtel2
        • 3 years ago

        Many many more desktops will be able to use stuff from Linux userland now, hence year of Linux on the desktop (which has been posited by someone to be basically every year for a long time now, to the extent it’s usually just a joke at this point).

          • BIF
          • 3 years ago

          I guess I’m still not getting it.

          Will the Windows 10 update allow either Linux use like in a VM, or will it be more like being able to run some Linuxesque functions or being able to run Linux apps natively in Windows?

            • synthtel2
            • 3 years ago

            Being able to run Linux apps natively in Windows.

            • travbrad
            • 3 years ago

            but will it replicate the joy of spending hours trying to get wireless drivers to work?

            • LostCat
            • 3 years ago

            and giving up and putting Windows back on there

    • synthtel2
    • 3 years ago

    [quote<]Microsoft showed off a new, as-yet-unnamed Windows subsystem that allows native Linux binaries to run on Windows[/quote<] Butbutbut April fools day isn't until Friday!

      • brucethemoose
      • 3 years ago

      On April 1st, Microsoft will announce that they’re making the Windows 10 update optional, and will stop pushing it on people.

        • DoomGuy64
        • 3 years ago

        They’ll also declare full support for PC gaming, meaning no more exclusives and current xbox games will now run in windows.

    • crabjokeman
    • 3 years ago

    Does the Linux “native filesystem” support mean support for (at least) reading ext2/3/4 volumes?
    If Win10 got that and some Windows Update improvements/fixes, I’d be a lot happier with it, though I’m still going to use Linux 90-some% of the time regardless.

      • Deanjo
      • 3 years ago

      [quote<]Does the Linux "native filesystem" support mean support for (at least) reading ext2/3/4 volumes?[/quote<] I'm actually thinking that by "native filesystem" they are actually referring to proper FHS support.

        • willmore
        • 3 years ago

        FHS? NTFS, maybe?

          • Deanjo
          • 3 years ago

          [url<]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Filesystem_Hierarchy_Standard[/url<]

      • nanoflower
      • 3 years ago

      It almost certainly means that the Linux tools will be able to access the Windows filesystem. Much like you can do today with Cygwin and the MingW shell.

        • Deanjo
        • 3 years ago

        Na, I doubt it. They are talking here about running native linux binaries in a POSIX runtime environment Cygwin/MingW are quite different as they are utils built to use the Windows runtime environment. Yes you can run bash on Windows already but it is a port and not a native linux binary.

        synthel2 provided a good link to what this is all about

        [url<]http://blog.dustinkirkland.com/2016/03/ubuntu-on-windows.html[/url<]

          • synthtel2
          • 3 years ago

          From my link:

          [quote<]All of your Windows drives, like C: are mounted read/write directly under /mnt. And, vice versa, you can see all of your Ubuntu filesystem from Windows Explorer in C:\Users\Kirkland\AppData\Local\Lxss\rootfs\[/quote<] 😉

            • Deanjo
            • 3 years ago

            Yup, FHS layout. Also:

            [quote<]"Hum, well it's like cygwin perhaps?" Nope! Cygwin includes open source utilities are recompiled from source to run natively in Windows. Here, we're talking about bit-for-bit, checksum-for-checksum Ubuntu ELF binaries running directly in Windows.[/quote<] ;D [quote<]"So maybe something like a Linux emulator?" Now you're getting warmer! A team of sharp developers at Microsoft has been hard at work adapting some Microsoft research technology to basically perform real time translation of Linux syscalls into Windows OS syscalls. [b<]Linux geeks can think of it sort of the inverse of "wine" [/b<]-- Ubuntu binaries running natively in Windows. Microsoft calls it their "Windows Subsystem for Linux". (No, it's not open source at this time.)[/quote<]

            • Beahmont
            • 3 years ago

            So are they just aliasing the syscalls or are they running Linux syscalls directly?

            • Deanjo
            • 3 years ago

            Tough to tell yet with the information out there. It could very similar to what longene is doing to run Windows binaries on linux which could be either or depending on the call made. Another alternative is that it operates a lot like WoW64 does.

            What would be interesting is to find out if it is running linux 32 or 64-bit binaries. Would they have to do a double translation if you try to run a 32-bit linux binary on a 64-bit Windows system?

            • Beahmont
            • 3 years ago

            Interesting. I know enough about the guts of Windows and programming to be a menace, but I always love learning new things. One of these days I’ll actually find the time to learn this stuff in a less ad hoc fashion.

      • RAGEPRO
      • 3 years ago

      [quote=”nanoflower”<]It almost certainly means that the Linux tools will be able to access the Windows filesystem. Much like you can do today with Cygwin and the MingW shell.[/quote<]Yes, this is correct. However, I believe making Cygwin access the native filesystem requires a bit of a hacky workaround in that the Windows filesystem is mounted as a volume inside the Cygwin environment. I could be wrong on that; if so please forgive my lapse in knowledge, I don't know that much about it. Anyway, essentially the idea is that the Linux applications will be able to run exactly as any other Windows applications, with the same filesystem access and all that. Sorry for the confusion. No filesystem driver for ext* volumes yet.

      • faramir
      • 3 years ago

      [url<]http://www.ext2fsd.com/[/url<] I have used this without a hitch on a read-only volume. Writing should work as well but had no need for it so I never tested it.

    • odizzido
    • 3 years ago

    have they added the ability to control updates yet?

      • crabjokeman
      • 3 years ago

      Yeah, I felt Windows Update was definitely two steps backward in that regard compared to Win7.

      • BIF
      • 3 years ago

      With Windows 10 Pro, you can change the group policy to control updates. I’ve done it on my Windows 10 machine.

      But it’s a two-edged sword. I seem to get the prompt “you need some updates” about once or twice PER DAY, and I seem to have to continually consent to the same update being applied 3 or 4 times within a week.

      • Deanjo
      • 3 years ago

      It would actually hilarious if they decided to say of you wanted control of updates, consider using our new apt-get repo.

    • Neutronbeam
    • 3 years ago

    What if Cortana hears the voice command as “Upchuck the PowerPoint that I worked on last night”? I have a baaaad feeling about this….

      • CheetoPet
      • 3 years ago

      Cortana: are you sure you want to delete last nights power point? You spend 6 hours working it.
      User: NOO!!! DON’T DELETE MY POWERPOINT!!!
      Cortana: ok, deleting it because you insist. If you delete all your other documents from work you will free up 100MB of space. Let me help you with that…

      • w76
      • 3 years ago

      I was thinking more along the lines of “Send my boss the file I was working on last night.” Cortana: “Okay, e-mailing your wife CrazyCollegeGirls4K.mkv.”

      • BIF
      • 3 years ago

      Guys, that’s not Cortana, that’s Siri!

      She’s got a mean streak, that one does.

    • CuttinHobo
    • 3 years ago

    Huh…. The running of Linux binaries is an announcement I never saw coming. I guess Microsoft’s SQL Server announcement from 3/7 was just the tip of the spear.

      • Anonymous Coward
      • 3 years ago

      I’m left wondering if its a useful addition. Lots of software can run on either Windows or Linux already. They risk that fewer people will be interested in making “real” Windows programs. Seems like a mess.

        • synthtel2
        • 3 years ago

        Yup, that’s AC from Slashdot alright. Can’t post that much and only use /., eh? *upvoted for the meta*

    • brucethemoose
    • 3 years ago

    [quote<] multi-GPU support, mods, and display overlays [/quote<] These are things that Windows shouldn't be interfering with in the first place. [quote<] Microsoft showed off a new, as-yet-unnamed Windows subsystem that allows native Linux binaries to run on Windows with native filesystem support. [/quote<] Now that is interesting... I wonder what their motivation for implementing that is.

      • Deanjo
      • 3 years ago

      [quote<]Now that is interesting... I wonder what their motivation for implementing that is.[/quote<] Transitioning to a Windows based on the linux kernel perhaps?

        • shank15217
        • 3 years ago

        There are a whole host of storage technologies that windows could benefit from by support Linux filesystems, its about time. This is a lot more exciting in the server world.

          • Deanjo
          • 3 years ago

          [quote<]There are a whole host of storage technologies that windows could benefit from by support Linux filesystems[/quote<] This however has NOTHING to do with that. This is not about being able to use EXT/BTRFS/XFS/etc on windows. This is about being able to use the two different OS filesystem hierarchy somewhat interchangeably.

      • [+Duracell-]
      • 3 years ago

      [quote<] Now that is interesting... I wonder what their motivation for implementing that is.[/quote<] Most open-source tooling nowadays have OS X and Linux instructions that are very similar, but you have to jump through hoops to get to work in Windows correctly. It also simplifies developers' lives by having to only learn one command line and the tooling around it as opposed to two (Powershell with the Select-String alias and bash/grep). Since Windows 10 will run an Ubuntu subsystem, essentially, I can just use the apt package manager to grab the tools I need and just run them in a bash shell as opposed to going through whatever steps I need to take to get the tools to work in Windows. Take a look at Git, for example. For Windows, I have to download an installer, then have it potentially change quite a few environment variables in order for it to work. With Ubuntu, I just need to do [code<]sudo apt-get install git[/code<] and it's done. Same with NodeJS: [code<]curl -sL [url<]https://deb.nodesource.com/setup_4.x[/url<] | sudo -E bash - sudo apt-get install -y nodejs [/code<] As opposed to downloading an installer and messing with environment variables.

        • Anonymous Coward
        • 3 years ago

        If microsoft is aiming to attract people to Windows by smelling like Linux, they should go all the way and make it a standard part of the OS. Otherwise this seems like chaos.

          • [+Duracell-]
          • 3 years ago

          Well, they are making it essentially an app that you can download. Define standard part of the OS, anyways. There are some parts Windows is so much better at than Linux.

        • sweatshopking
        • 3 years ago

        You can basically apt-get with PowerShell for while now.

          • [+Duracell-]
          • 3 years ago

          Yeah, I know chocolatey is there. Doesn’t change the fact that I have to deal with two types of command prompts as a dev.

        • Timbrelaine
        • 3 years ago

        Bingo. This is a huge, huge deal. I do a lot of work in OS X almost entirely because of bash. Most of the expensive GUI-based programs I use are completely cross-platform, so the availability of bash is decisive.

      • RAGEPRO
      • 3 years ago

      [quote=”brucethemoose”<]Now that is interesting... I wonder what their motivation for implementing that is.[/quote<]Microsoft demoed bash as part of an initiative to welcome software developers to use Windows as their home for developing software. I think the idea is that people can bring over bash and gcc and whatever else they're comfortable developing with. Seems a bit dim to me personally; if I was an open-source (or especially a free software) advocate, I would probably not want to deal with the trappings of the closed-source Windows environment. Furthermore, I felt it a bit schizophrenic considering immediately before that in the keynote presentation they had just been talking about their wonderful walled garden. I dunno. Microsoft of 2016 continues to bewilder me.

        • brucethemoose
        • 3 years ago

        Reminds me of this:

        [url<]http://www.globalnerdy.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/microsoft-org-chart.jpg[/url<] On one hand, Microsoft is repeatedly saying "Look how great our walled garden app model is! This is the future!" And then they go and show off a bash running in Windows... I'm getting mixed messages here.

          • [+Duracell-]
          • 3 years ago

          I think they want developers to develop ON Windows using the tools they know. Not necessarily FOR Windows, although it would be a plus for them if people started to take advantage of the “walled garden app model” to deploy to a multitude of device types easily.

            • cygnus1
            • 3 years ago

            They want developers in Windows using visual studio with Xamarin now. That will let developers write .net apps that can be, with supposedly little effort, compiled for UWP, iOS, or Android.

        • _ppi
        • 3 years ago

        [quote<]Seems a bit dim to me personally; if I was an open-source (or especially a free software) advocate, I would probably not want to deal with the trappings of the closed-source Windows environment. Furthermore, I felt it a bit schizophrenic considering immediately before that in the keynote presentation they had just been talking about their wonderful walled garden. I dunno. Microsoft of 2016 continues to bewilder me.[/quote<] You have to realize MS wants and needs to cater to a pretty wide crowd: from your average Joes and grandmoms, who love their iPhones through and to various levels of power users and developers, who like to tinker with all aspects of their OS

      • tipoo
      • 3 years ago

      “I wonder what their motivation for implementing that is”

      Embrace, extend, extinguish?

      • cygnus1
      • 3 years ago

      [quote<] These are things that Windows shouldn't be interfering with in the first place. [/quote<] How do you figure? Do you understand how sandboxing and hardware abstraction work?

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