3DMark’s latest update includes a preview of VRMark

Futuremark is releasing a preview of its VRMark benchmarking tool for owners of its 3DMark Advanced and 3DMark Enterprise benchmarking suites today. VRMark is designed to test VR hardware like the Oculus Rift and HTC Vive, and it can run on 2D monitors for those still waiting on VR hardware. The VRMark preview doesn't produce a benchmark score, but viewers can still freely explore two interactive scenes in this release. One of the scenes is meant to be run on the minimum-spec GeForce GTX 970, while the other is meant for more demanding hardware. The scene below depicts the two dioramas that can be viewed.

This3DMark release also provides a couple new benchmarks for 3DMark Basic, a new UI that Futuremark calls easier-to-use, and improved Steam integration. 3DMark Basic will now include the Ice Storm Extreme and Ice Storm Unlimited benchmarks. The new UI features a home screen that recommends an appropriate benchmark based on the host system, as well as a redesigned benchmark launcher. The benchmarks have also been separated into individual modules, allowing Steam to install and update them individually.

Comments closed
    • jihadjoe
    • 4 years ago

    I don’t understand why people would want to benchmark using a synthetic tool when they could benchmark actual games or CUDA/OpenCL apps instead.

    Something like UE4 Elemental Tech Demo would be much more representative of actual game performance than 3DMark.

      • iBend
      • 4 years ago

      because this bench used as global standard.. its easier to compare performance between graphic card using standarized benchmark

        • Deanjo
        • 4 years ago

        A tech demo for a game engine can do that as well, take a look at the unigine benchmark programs.

        • jihadjoe
        • 4 years ago

        Yeah and UE4 runs on PC, PS4, XBone, Android, IOS, OSX and Linux and is used in a ton of modern games.

        What I’m saying is 3DMark is being treated as “industry standard” with no good reason to do so, other than the fact that they used to be popular and useful back in the day when games often didn’t provide their own benchmarking tools.

      • zqw
      • 4 years ago

      Agreed for the “consumer” version. But, pro VRMark is tied to custom hardware that measures headset display latency. Hopefully it can also measure the more critical “motion to photon” latency, but I haven’t seen this stated yet. They do mention “timewarp performance” which gives me hope.

      • Krogoth
      • 4 years ago

      3DMark is just living on burrowed time from an era before developers started to make their own benchmarking tools and publicly released them for users to try out.

      It is riding on brand-name recognition, nothing more.

    • DeadOfKnight
    • 4 years ago

    Can’t benchmark VR? What good is it then?

      • Raymond Page
      • 4 years ago

      Eye candy.

      • Srsly_Bro
      • 4 years ago

      But can it be benched?

        • Peter.Parker
        • 4 years ago

        The more important question is: “Will it blend?”

          • Deanjo
          • 4 years ago

          Don’t be silly, Blender has it’s own game engine.

          [url<]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blender_Game_Engine[/url<]

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