Corsair extends warranties on its high-end power supplies

Regular TR readers know that a solid power supply is essential to a successful PC build. Spending a bit extra on that little black box can net you a unit that will last you a couple of builds, or in some cases, a decade. To make sure that its high-end PSUs stay in service that long, Corsair is extending the warranty on its AXi, HXi, RMi, and RMx power supplies to 10 years.

This puts the peripheral and component vendor in rarefied territory shared only with EVGA, who also offers a ten-year warranty on its top-end units. Most of the popular high-quality PSU vendors—including Seasonic, Antec, and Thermaltake—offer a seven-year warranty on their top-end products.

The warranty extension affects not only new sales, but also past purchases dating back to the AXi range's introduction in 2012. Note that this extension does not include the standard AX, HX, or RM series units. No extra registration or other action is required to claim the extended warranty period.

Comments closed
    • hasseb64
    • 4 years ago

    Seems to be a LOW risk announcement for this company. I have only bought named PSUs last 15 years and I never had any quality problems at all with them, not even heard about any quality problems either.
    TBH, all my built computers have “died” due to lack of speed not lack of quality.
    Compared to other manufactured products DIY named computer parts have extremely high quality level.
    At least that is my experience.

    • Captain Ned
    • 4 years ago

    Good on ya Corsair. The HX520 that powered my 2007-era Conroe build 24/7 for close to eight years never let me down. I expect the same life out of the HX750i powering the current i7-4790K rig.

    • Buzzard44
    • 4 years ago

    I take gravest possible offense at Thermaltake being called a “high-quality PSU vendor”!

    Their PSU’s are less reliable than generic PSU’s that come with cheap cases. I don’t even think I have one 9 of uptime on the only Thermaltake PSU (well, plus the series of replacements) I still have that’s still running, due to the turnaround time it takes repeatedly RMA’ing the darn thing when it fails every year or two.

      • f0d
      • 4 years ago

      not all their psu’s are bad
      their higher end models have been the most reliable psu i have owned and installed into computers

      i have a thermaltake toughpower here thats been through something like 3 different systems (over something like 7 years) and its still going strong yet i have had 2 rma’s with an ax760i and refuse to use the psu for the 3rd time
      also had a corsair VS die on my brother a few months ago after 6 months usage (admittedly its their cheapest model) replaced it with a toughpower and its been fine ever since

      i have used a whole bunch of toughpower psu’s in friends and family’s pc’s i have built and none of them have had issues ever

        • wimpishsundew
        • 4 years ago

        Yeah, Thermaltake PSU have worked great for me. The only problem minor problem I have is replacing them every 6 months. Otherwise, it’s very reliable.

          • f0d
          • 4 years ago

          its funny how people say this yet i never have any problems with them
          do they send all the good thermaltake psu’s to australia? or is everyone using the cheap $50 models?

            • just brew it!
            • 4 years ago

            Well, to be fair I did tend to buy their budget to mid-range units, not the high-end ones. But even when considered against other units in their price range, they were horrible. Antec, Coolermaster, Seasonic, and Corsair PSUs of similar price were all way more reliable than Thermaltake, in my experience.

            Combine that with the fact that every Thermaltake HSF or case fan I’ve owned has developed fan bearing issues after an unreasonably short period of time (just a few months in many cases), and I think you can understand why I’m very leery of buying or recommending Thermaltake products.

            TBH the only Thermaltake product I’ve owned that I [i<]wasn't[/i<] extremely disappointed with in the end has been their BlacX external drive dock.

      • nanoflower
      • 4 years ago

      Thermaltake is the same as Corsair. Some of their PSUs are built to high quality standards but they also have some cheap PSUs that can fail quickly if pushed hard. The problem is the average consumer hasn’t a clue that there’s that much of a difference in quality between the PSUs from the same vendor.

    • Meadows
    • 4 years ago

    What? Warranties are getting longer again? What year is it?

    • Dposcorp
    • 4 years ago

    When is the last time you saw a company extend the warranty on products it already sold, when no recall was involved? GREAT JOB CORSAIR! Corsair will be my next few power supply purchases for sure.

      • brucethemoose
      • 4 years ago

      [i<] Puts on tinfoil hat [/i<] I think part of their motivation is to keep their brand strong, which sells ALL their PSUs. They keep doing things like selling solid high-end PSUs and extending warranties, so people online repeatedly say Corsair PSUs are great PSUs... this reputation extends to their low end PSUs, which unfortunately don't have the same build quality standards or long warranties.

        • Dposcorp
        • 4 years ago

        I think we all know and understand some of the reasons they are doing it.

        Pointis, what other brand is extending warranties on ANYTHING it has already sold?

        Regardless of brand of item or the position in the brands lineup, you don’t see this very often on stuff already sold.

        Kudos to Corsair.

    • kuttan
    • 4 years ago

    For practical reasons do people really need 10 year warranty PSU ?? I asking so because when you build a new PC you never going to use the exact configuration for more than 3 or 4 years after say 3 year you probably upgrade a few components in the PC like GPU, adding more RAM, SSDs etc. With the upgraded PC you would use the PC for another 2 or 3 years, totaling maximum 7 years use with the same PSU.

    When a PC is used for more than 5 or 7 years it can’t be upgraded any longer and had to build a new PC from scratch. When you build a new PC then what will you do with your old 10 year warranty PSU ?? The old PSU then may not be able to support some new features of the then new motherboard, CPU etc (Haswell compatible PSU needed for deep sleep support for example) or you may be going with a top end GPU and powering it with a heavily used 7 year old PSU is not a good idea.

    Since this 10 year warranty is not free but its charged from the users himself for not having any real benefits. The maximum warranty for a PSU should be 7 years not more is my opinion.

      • JMccovery
      • 4 years ago

      If a manufacturer is confident that their products will last 10 years, what is wrong with providing a warranty for that long?

      I had a Corsair HX520 that lasted for 8 years, with a majority of that time period being powered on 24/7.

      If one builds mid-range systems, you can easily pull 10 years, especially if standards do not change all that much.

        • kuttan
        • 4 years ago

        As I said warranty do not come free. The manufacturer charges some amount of money from the customers in case the product needs to repaired or replaced, its more like insurance. Why people need to pay more for warranty is what I asked. A PSU having 5-7 year warranty is optimum anything beyond that is paying too much for the PSU. Its like you insure your car for 20 years which doesn’t make sense .

      • VincentHanna
      • 4 years ago

      There is nothing stopping you from re-using a 10 year old case, or a 10 year old PSU, or a 10 year old SSD (as a backup drive) (and honestly even the CPU if you didn’t cheap out in the first place), if everything is still working. I can’t tell you how many gamers out there are still rocking their 2500k-2600k s into their third, fourth or fifth builds. I can’t think of a single reason for me to have to “start over from scratch” on my main rig, for a long time. The people who do a new build every 2 years do so because they are chasing the incremental improvements in the low end. In the High end, the CPU space has stalled, Power requirements are going down, not up, and a solid case with good airflow is pretty much golden. You tell me what is coming out in the next 7 years that will make my 1000 watt PSU obsolete.

      And, heck, if your PSU bites it at 9 years, 4 months, and Corsair sends you a replacement, I have no doubt that, I could re-use THAT PSU at in a few more builds afterwards. Besides, 10 years is a nice round number. I think all warranties for all things should be issued in nice round numbers. “Is my opinion”

        • nanoflower
        • 4 years ago

        My old PSU had lasted me at least 7 years. Would have kept it a few more years but the system was acting a bit flaky and it got replaced in an effort to track down the problem. I suspect my current PSU would last equally as long but it may get replaced after just a few years because it’s only a 430W Seasonic and I’m looking at some mid-high end GPUs that might need more power than it can provide unless it turns out the Pacal/Polaris GPUs can really deliver on good performance per watt.

      • Rageypoo
      • 4 years ago

      Current trends in power saving and overall usage would suggest otherwise.

    • Welch
    • 4 years ago

    Even more reason for me to love Corsair. I’ve built well over 100+ machines with supplies as low end as the CX430 (the bulk of the builds) all the way to the HX850 (more commonly HX(i)750) and only had to return a single CX430 due to it’s fan controller supposedly being defective and running the fan 100% regardless of load or temps from start up.

    The few times I’ve had to talk with their support they were amazing. No questions asked shipped off parts and didn’t charge a dime for the replacements or shipping. To extend out a warranty and apply to even those who purchased before the change, is a sign of a company that really gives a damn.

    Maybe one day Corsair will give me reason to not talk them up, but not today.

      • Visigoth
      • 4 years ago

      Agreed. Their PSU’s are top-of-the-line, just like Silverstone, Fortron and EVGA.

      • brucethemoose
      • 4 years ago

      [url=http://www.overclock.net/t/1431436/why-you-should-not-buy-a-corsair-cx<]Corsair's CX PSUs are not in the same league has their more expensive ones. [/url<] There's a reason the CX lineup has a 3 year warranty, which wasn't extended here. Honestly, I think many of their higher end PSUs rather pricey for what you get, but that's a separate issue.

        • Welch
        • 4 years ago

        Yeah they do cost more, but aren’t as pricey as the Seasonic, generally speaking anyhow.

        I didn’t realize EVGA was offering 10 year warranties… wow. I’ve always avoided them because their video cards were middle of the road and felt gimmicky. So when they started having people make supplies for them under their name I was hesitant. Perhaps I should look at them from time to time.

        The CX lineup is miles ahead of most of the crap OEMs put into their consumer grade office machines though, and at least have protective circuitry in them. So I figure in the 5 year period, if it goes through a single power supply it would still be cheaper to replace, but I’ve had some of those in well over 4 years so, maybe even 5. I’ve seen the cheapo supplies last well over 5 years so I expect these to last close to 6-7 years, especially by the ultra mild load on them. You’re right though, they aren’t nearly the same quality as you’d get moving up into same the RM, even the fan is not ball bearing.

        Very good link Bruce. It’s why I only use these for the most basic of i3 builds, I’d be surprised if they are even anywhere near 40-50% usage at peak with the builds. I pretty much only buy the CX430, not the CX600’s because if I need that much more power then the parts demand a better quality supply.

          • brucethemoose
          • 4 years ago

          Seasonic is very pricey as well, but the rebranded Seasonic units are great. Recently, I grabbed a 650W Gold XFX unit that was actually a rebranded Seasonic for less than a Seasonic or Corsair bronze PSU.

    • Tumbleweed
    • 4 years ago

    If you give a damn about your system lasting a long time, you should also be investing in a high-quality uninterruptible power supply, preferably one with true sine wave output.

      • Flapdrol
      • 4 years ago

      I don’t think a ups helps much with that unless you live in a place with a terrible power grid.

      Wasn’t it more of a data loss/corruption safeguard, so you don’t lose stuff that was in the write buffer?

        • Visigoth
        • 4 years ago

        Unforeseen power surges, brownouts or God forbid blackouts can happen at the most critical time, when you desperately need your PC the most. Don’t leave something like that to chance, invest in a quality UPS. Thank me later…you’ll be glad your UPS took the hit of a lightning storm and sacrificed itself instead of your thousands of dollars worth of equipment!

          • Flapdrol
          • 4 years ago

          Lightning damages through induction, it’ll go via ethernet (or any other long cable) right into the motherboard. Doubt it’ll save the pc, might save the psu though, but the psu is cheap compared to the ups.

          If you need 100% uptime a ups is obviously a good idea, but imo a good psu protects your system just fine.

            • Deanjo
            • 4 years ago

            I’ve seen first hand a UPS save a server because of a lightning strike. The UPS was cooked but the server remained intact.

            • Visigoth
            • 4 years ago

            Most of the higher-end UPS’s feature an ethernet port to connect your wires and protect all of your equipment.

            • VincentHanna
            • 4 years ago

            Most higher end surge protectors have Ethernet and coax too, for that matter.

      • Jigar
      • 4 years ago

      Thumb rule, and always followed it.

      • Chrispy_
      • 4 years ago

      I would have thought the damage comes from overvoltage surges, and a surge protector covers that, decent ones usually have an RJ11 jack for the broadband too, as long as your not stuck with coax fibre.

    • MEATLOAF2
    • 4 years ago

    I had a Corsair cx750 PSU die on me a week or so ago, thought it took the whole system with it but I suppose it wanted to die alone. Sure it wasn’t a high end one but a couple years isn’t really what I expected out of a Corsair PSU.

    I replaced it with a much more expensive EVGA Supernova 750w platinum PSU. At the very least, even if this one decides to explode or something I’ll have saved a few bucks on my power bill.

      • Srsly_Bro
      • 4 years ago

      Nice choice. Those seem to be some of the highest rated PSU s.

    • EndlessWaves
    • 4 years ago

    Are we going to be using the increasingly oversized looking ATX power connectors in more than seven years time?

      • JMccovery
      • 4 years ago

      It’s entirely possible, as the 20/24-pin connector has been around for 20 years.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 4 years ago

      They’re never going away. The standards bodies could come out with smaller connectors and people would reject them as a needless money grab. It’s unfortunate but sometimes consumers are the ones getting in the way of progress.

      • Krogoth
      • 4 years ago

      Until we move onto a completely new form factor and remove some of the legacy rails. I doubt it will happen.

      The reason why there are are so many wires for 12V rail because of safety and thermal issues. You don’t want to pull 10A+ over 12V with a single 18-24 gauge wiring that are commonly used in power supplies.

      • VincentHanna
      • 4 years ago

      Even if they change it up, I have no doubt that whatever the new connection looks like will be adaptable with a $30 set of cables. Even if I KNEW it were coming, it wouldn’t deter me from buying a nice PSU.

      Actually, for me, the warranty is pretty far down the list of reasons to get one anyway. The best customer service is from the company you never need to call.

    • Srsly_Bro
    • 4 years ago

    I have a gen 1 tx750 that’s been going strong since fall 2009. Do these last 15 years? I’m a big fan of corsair. I have an m45, mouse pad, k70, h80igt and the psu.

    The PSU has been running almost 24/7 since on world community grid. I even ran it at 90% for several weeks straight. I’m impressed with the odm of the PSU.

      • f0d
      • 4 years ago

      i have the exact opposite experience
      i have an AX760i here i just wont use anymore because of how many times its been returned and the RMA policy is a joke imo as i had to pay for the shipping costs from australia and it was about 1/2 the price i paid for the psu
      (heres a pic of it in my system [url<]http://s17.postimg.org/dmh6oujzj/P1010510.jpg)[/url<] everyone craps on thermaltake but my thermaltake psu has already outlived the corsair twice over

        • Srsly_Bro
        • 4 years ago

        Nice PC. I’m going to get an evga plat 650 as my next PSU. My corsair 750 tx has served me well.

      • Deanjo
      • 4 years ago

      I’ve got some pre-OCZ PC Power and Cooling silencers (and some Sparkles) that have been going a bit longer 2006/7 ish and still going strong.

        • anotherengineer
        • 4 years ago

        I have 890 Amps on the 12V rail 😉

        [url<]https://images.whisystems.com/Smartpages/partinfo_resize/DCL/27PG_ALTERNATE1.JPG[/url<]

          • Deanjo
          • 4 years ago

          Do you really want me to pull out the tractor and combine batteries? 😛

            • anotherengineer
            • 4 years ago

            Don’t those things have 24V batteries?

            Bet they can push some good amperage!!

            • Deanjo
            • 4 years ago

            Mine has 4 X 6 volt batteries running in a series/parallel setup @ 12 volts. Each battery is rated at 875 Amp.

      • Rza79
      • 4 years ago

      [quote<]I'm impressed with the odm of the PSU.[/quote<] If I'm not mistaken, that would be CWT. The first gen TX series was really good. I mean long lasting. Few failures. I had a huge amount of failures with the more expensive 1st gen HX620 (Seasonic).

      • Vaughn
      • 4 years ago

      I’m still on my AX750 which will stay with a 7 year warranty. I can easily see myself getting 7-10 years out of it best PSU I’ve owned so far.

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