Rockit 88 CPU delidder tool pops the top on recent Intel chips

Rockit Cool's Rockit 88 is a Kickstarter project that aims to make delidding—the practice of removing a CPU's integrated heat spreader, or IHS—easier. Delidding a CPU for extra cooling potential is a well-known but risky practice for extreme overclockers, since it usually involves pliers, a vise, and an X-Acto knife. A slip-up with any of these tools could harm the CPU. The Rockit 88 appears to work by holding Haswell and Skylake CPUs in a dedicated bracket and shearing off the IHS with a moving block. Rockit Cool claims that reducing the thickness of the thermal interface material between the processor die and the IHS on an unspecified, overclocked Devil's Canyon CPU resulted in a 10°C improvement in load temperatures.

Even with the safety and reliability of a delid tool, we're guessing that the risk of damage to the CPU isn't completely eliminated. Even with a dedicated tool, the thermal benefit of delidding is questionable for all but the most extreme overclockers. Going by testing on an older Intel CPU performed by an Anandtech forum member, the upper limit of benefits is about 10°C under load. Linus Tech Tips also tried delidding, and that anecdote suggests even more modest benefits. Still, the Rockit 88 might make the process safer, and it's simple-looking enough that its Kickstarter isn't as scary to back as more ambitious projects might be. Aspiring delidders can pledge $35 in exchange for a complete Rockit 88 kit. Rockit Cool expects to begin delivering Rockit 88s in May.

Comments closed
    • LoneWolf15
    • 3 years ago

    Unless you can get me something like MSI’s Delid Die Guard or another shim that works well with delidded Intel processors to make them compatible with standard heatsinks, delidding isn’t a process I’m going to do.

    It’s harder to find the shim than it is to do the delid process, even if that tool makes it easy. Sounds like another Kickstarter project.

    • ronch
    • 3 years ago

    Back when the original Athlon came without a heat spreader, people complained because it was easy to crack the die. Now practically all CPUs come with an IHS and people want to remove them. Yes I am well aware of the reason but… Oh the irony.

      • reever
      • 3 years ago

      Something something enthusiasts are a tiny subset of the market something something. But yeah people by the loads are taking off their IHS. Maybe even a tenth of a percent of PC users.

        • Krogoth
        • 3 years ago

        It is much smaller than that. It is the same crowd that opts for exotic cooling solutions.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 3 years ago

      definitely not irony.

        • UberGerbil
        • 3 years ago

        It’s like ray-ee-yane on your wedding day.

      • LoneWolf15
      • 3 years ago

      If Intel used fluxless solder and not TIM, they wouldn’t; it’d be just fine.

    • Gilbster
    • 3 years ago

    [url<]https://www.caseking.de/en/der8auer-delid-die-mate-fsd8-015.html[/url<] You can buy such a thing month ago in germany. news from guru3d back then [url<]http://www.guru3d.com/news-story/delid-your-cpu-with-the-delid-die-mate.html[/url<]

    • madmanmarz
    • 3 years ago

    I upgraded from an FX-8320 to a 6600k a few months back and I couldn’t believe how hot these chips get. I ended up delidding. I used a razor to get one corner started (after seeing pics of the naked chip for the safest spot), and then used a thin credit card to work the rest of the way around.

    But take note – most people PUT THE IHS BACK ON, the problem is that there can be a gap and or uneven spread of the stock Intel paste under the cap. Mine was very uneven and I had varying temps across the cores.

    Anyway long story short, I replaced the on die paste with liquid metal (Conductonaut), removed as much of the black adhesive that used to hold on the IHS, and put a tiny amount of high temp RTV in its place. I then quickly put the CPU into the socket, made sure the cap was on evenly, and installed the water block right away in order to press the cap onto the die as much as possible before everything dried.

    The temperature improvement was MASSIVE. The cores are all within 1-2c where as before they were fluctuating more than 10c. I am able to now run Prime95 (small/large FFT, blend, doesn’t matter), at 4.7ghz and 1.44v (not the greatest chip) and I barely hit 65c. Previously I was around 90c at that overclock. Metal paste on die is the only way to go and I am sold.

    Although yes, this is inherently dangerous, doing it the way I described or using one of these delidders takes a lot of the screw up factor out of the equation. You can also send it to siliconlottery and have them do it for you.

      • biffzinker
      • 3 years ago

      If your shoving 1.44v into your chip I might as well have a go at 5ghz after all this 4790K started stabilizing at 1.4v running 5ghz. Wonder if it would hold up? Under a full load however I would be looking at 175-200 watts, lot of heat to deal with.

        • biffzinker
        • 3 years ago

        Nah, on second thought I’ll stick with 4.9ghz at 1.372v πŸ™‚

      • kuttan
      • 3 years ago

      Wow excellent achievement there. Good work. But don’t you think 1.44V is too much for a 14nm CPU ??

      • Polum
      • 3 years ago

      What’s the point of putting the IHS back on, instead of putting the cooler directly on the cpu ?

    • Krogoth
    • 3 years ago

    Why?

    De-lidding IHS on CPUs is foolhardy. There’s a reason why CPU vendors implemented them in the first place.

    It really does not take that much torque or shock to crack the silicon on an exposed chip using a typical HSF solution. There are countless horror stories from P-III Coppermine and Socket A with HSF solutions.

      • Deanjo
      • 3 years ago

      Pretty sure that the people delidding are well aware of the risks, have accepted it and know to take extra care when mounting.

      The coppermine and socket A issues were also elevated due to the retention system of the CPU’s back then where it placed extreme focused force on the edge of the chip during the snapdown of the retention bracket. That being said, millions of chips were still seated and a HSF placed on them without incident. Fractures of the core on those chips probably fall within the 1/10th of a percent range.

        • JMccovery
        • 3 years ago

        I remember one time when a Thermaltake Volcano 3 (or 5, been a while) broke one of the lugs off of a Super7 board when I was trying to lock it down; nothing scarier than seeing a chunk of aluminum hurtling towards your face.

        Also cracked an XP 2800 with a Volcano 7+. Sad panda was sad.

      • ColeLT1
      • 3 years ago

      To each his own. My 4790k is running great with direct contact EK waterblock, no lid, and a huge temp drop. My 6700k was another story…

    • Jigar
    • 3 years ago

    There are not words to describe the joy after successful delidding and for old school like me, there is no replacement of blade method (ofcource the tension and pressure during this process is worth it if you are successful)

    • ronch
    • 3 years ago

    Then Intel suddenly decides to sell lidless chips for Extreme People.

    Now we know what the ‘EP’ suffix stands for.

    • Srsly_Bro
    • 3 years ago

    I’m so proud of TR for hiring a writer who understands logic and the use of “all but” in a sentence. Yes, we’re doing this again…bros.

    edit:

    before all the butt-hurt arrives, I’m not insinuating TR hasn’t hired competent writers in the past.

    If you didn’t read the above disclosure, show me your love with down-thumbs.

      • the
      • 3 years ago

      Purportedly.

    • CScottG
    • 3 years ago

    Wayne:

    “Exsqueeze me?

    ..$35 to get my processor “popped”?

    It will be mine. Oh yes, it will be mine.”

      • derFunkenstein
      • 3 years ago

      “I don’t even have *A* processor, let alone many processors that would necessitate an entire rack.”

    • DrCR
    • 3 years ago

    I haven’t done a delid-eqsue operation since removing the ATI 9700 Pro’s shim.

    Wow, that was a long time ago now. Anyone else do that?

      • Chrispy_
      • 3 years ago

      o/

      …and slapped a golden orb on there too.

      • Waco
      • 3 years ago

      I sanded the package down on my old ti4200…the metal cap/IHS was below the packaging material. I went down to bare copper, boosted my OC by 50% and lowered temps by a crazy amount using some old Pentium pin-style heatsink and a small fan.

      The good old days…

        • biffzinker
        • 3 years ago

        I tried doing that to a Geforce 2 GTS I posted in this thread: [url=https://techreport.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=29&t=117495&start=30#p1298143<]Whats the most recent dumb thing you did to your PC? [/url<]

      • Jigar
      • 3 years ago

      Delidded my i5 4670K – currently seats stable at 4.8GHZ with max temp at 70C, also it can do 5 GHZ but needs a lot volts which i am not comfortable with.

    • tipoo
    • 3 years ago

    So now you need an acid etching bath and an electron microscope…

    • anotherengineer
    • 3 years ago

    You’d think that with the thermal density of sub 28nm chips they would use solder.

    Wonder if there is a reason they don’t (other than cost)??

      • Kougar
      • 3 years ago

      It’s still used on Xeons and the HEDP prosumer chips. Only reason is cost and less manufacturing complexity.

    • Neutronbeam
    • 3 years ago

    The process sounds…delidcious!

    [yeah, I know. Not even up to my usual low standards–I blame the media, the current phase of the moon and an ancient Sumerian prophecy predicting that I would make a REALLY lame post today and then try to weasel out of it–guilty!]

      • Anovoca
      • 3 years ago

      [url<]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RD2G9INQL3k[/url<]

        • DarkMikaru
        • 3 years ago

        For those to lazy to click the link…

        “crickets – crickets – crickets”

    • cmrcmk
    • 3 years ago

    The way it’s holding the CPU looks like it would have to be customized for each socket and potentially each revision of the IHS. So $35 gets the ability to delid 2 generations of processor unless Intel doesn’t change the mechanical design for the next one.

      • torquer
      • 3 years ago

      If you’re going to delid, which pretty much no one should do, $35 is probably cheap insurance compared to possibly ruining a $300+ processor or slicing into your sausage fingers.

      • Anovoca
      • 3 years ago

      Your comment didn’t include the phrase “I remember” πŸ™

      • just brew it!
      • 3 years ago

      As long as future CPU packages aren’t bigger in length/width it looks like it should be adaptable with simple spacers/shims. If the CPU is thinner, put a shim underneath the CPU; if it is thicker, put a shim between the two halves of the delidder; if the length and/or width is less, put spacers around the sides of the cavity.

    • torquer
    • 3 years ago

    I remember wearing hats to work every day. Then I got delidded.

      • uwsalt
      • 3 years ago

      No worries, get your lids at Lids and live forever bro!

      [url<]https://vimeo.com/50754087[/url<]

    • chΒ΅ck
    • 3 years ago

    I remember delidding my athlon 64 3000+ handheld with a razorblade.
    In hindsight, that wasn’t the safest thing to do.

      • Flapdrol
      • 3 years ago

      You wanna know how I got these scars?

        • ozzuneoj
        • 3 years ago

        LOL

        • morphine
        • 3 years ago

        You win the internet. πŸ™‚

    • chuckula
    • 3 years ago

    You kids and your delidding tools!

    [url=https://techreport.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=88253&hilit=delidded+a+4770K#p1167066<]I remember when we had had to use a vice and a block of wood to delid chips in the snow uphill both ways![/url<] AND WE LIKED IT THAT WAY!

      • JMccovery
      • 3 years ago

      Did you do it while barefoot as well?

        • chuckula
        • 3 years ago

        YOU KIDS AND YOUR FEET! BACK WHEN I WAS DELIDDING WE HADN’T EVOLVED FEET YET AND HAD TO RELY ON PSEUDOPODS!

          • Anovoca
          • 3 years ago

          I do my delidding in a crack house. With a family of twelve. At night, we spoon for warmth. Everyone fights for Noelle. She’s the fattest.

            • CreoleLakerFan
            • 3 years ago

            At least you had a house.

            • cphite
            • 3 years ago

            House? You were lucky to have a HOUSE! We used to live in one room, all hundred and twenty-six of us, no furniture. Half the floor was missing; we were all huddled together in one corner for fear of FALLING!

      • BurntMyBacon
      • 3 years ago

      [quote<]I remember when we had had to use a vice and a block of wood to delid chips ...[/quote<] You should have seen the look on my wife's face when I told her I took a vice and sledge hammer to the most expensive processor we owned (0_0). Almost as good as the look when I showed her the setup with the vice and the sledge hammer to prove it. (I conveniently forgot to mention the wood or the fact that the processor was already in the system and running)

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This