Cooler Master MasterLiquid Pro coolers dare to be different

Cooler Master's next generation of all-in-one liquid CPU coolers is here. The company's MasterLiquid Pro 120 and MasterLiquid Pro 240 coolers incorporate a number of design changes over the Nepton 120XL and Nepton 240M that could potentially improve their performance and durability. As their names imply, the MasterLiquid Pro 120 uses a 120-mm, 1.5"-thick (or 38-mm-thick) radiator, while the Pro 240 is built with a 240-mm, 1"-thick (or 27-mm-thick) radiator.

At the pump end of the system, Cooler Master says the MasterLiquid Pros' new dual-chamber design offers some advantages compared to single-chamber pumps. The company claims that moving the critical components of the pump into a separate upper chamber lengthens the life of the system by only exposing them to cool liquid. The pump is also built with what Cooler Master calls a new "silent driver" for quiet operation.

The pump moves coolant from its upper chamber into a lower chamber, where it's "sprayed" on the center of the water block. Cooler Master claims this design offers superior performance compared to water blocks where coolant is pumped in at one end of the cold plate before passing over the entire water block. That design is purportedly susceptible to reductions in flow rate as the coolant moves across the dense fin array on top of the plate. The company says that its "spray-down" design also lets it pack more fins on top of the cold plate to increase the fin surface area and potentially improve performance.

The radiator on the MasterLiquid Pros looks unusual, too. Instead of the triangle-shaped fins we usually see on liquid-cooler radiators, the MasterLiquid Pro radiator uses a rectangular fin design. Cooler Master claims that this fin design increases the fin surface area in contact with the radiator channels for better heat transfer and lowers resistance for better airflow. The MasterLiquid Pros both come with Cooler Master's new MasterFan Pro Air Balance 120-mm fans. The company says these high-static-pressure fans use "silent-driver" tech similar to that of the motor in the pump to operate quietly while moving plenty of air.

The MasterLiquid Pro 120 and Pro 240 should be available soon from Amazon, Newegg, Micro Center, and Cooler Master's online store. The Pro 120 carries a $99.99 price tag, while the Pro 240 will sell for $119.99. Stay tuned for our review of these coolers.

Comments closed
    • Kougar
    • 4 years ago

    Both ideas look promising, will be looking forward to the reviews on this one. The layout of the fin housing with the single port out is going to create the same dead/slow zones though…

    If it shows genuine improvement in core temps I expect Swiftech and others will launch similar spray waterblock designs and/or radiators. I think there’s potential with the correct housing and port-out design.

    • kn00tcn
    • 4 years ago

    my little pony pump .jpg / what does masterliquid do? / spraying the cpu / touched by planes

    if you know what i mean…

    • DancinJack
    • 4 years ago

    So how soon can we expect that review?

      • Jeff Kampman
      • 4 years ago

      As soon as the coolers actually get here 🙂

        • nizer
        • 4 years ago

        Great new Jeff – please consider comparing it with the new Arctic Cooling Liquid Freezer 240 AIO that HardOCP found to be so efficient AND low noise at the same timer
        [url<]http://hardocp.com/article/2016/03/09/arctic_cooling_liquid_freezer_240_aio_cpu_cooler_review/4[/url<]

    • DrCR
    • 4 years ago

    Reading “spray” language bit reminds me of the old Cathar G4 Storm.

    If this is not just the equivalent of a good AC setup or otherwise subpar, $119.99 is a bargin for WCing. Those 90° bends are, regardless, painful to see though.

    Interesting fin design on the radiator. I’ll be interested to see just how effectual it is. Side question: Any worthy replacements for the ThermoChill radiators? (I’ve been out of the watercooling realm since around the time procooling started to wine down.)

      • brucethemoose
      • 4 years ago

      These aluminum AIO radiators aren’t really comparable to (or compatible with) copper radiators for custom loops like those old thermochills.

      I’ve heard good things about AlphaCool, EK, and XPSC (depending on the fin density you need), but I’m no expert.

    • Ninjitsu
    • 4 years ago

    [i<]MasterLiquid Pro[/i<] Marketing departments are running out of names...

      • curtisb
      • 4 years ago

      They missed an opportunity with [i<]MasterLiquid Flow[/i<].

    • Chrispy_
    • 4 years ago

    Looking forward to a review:

    The fans look good (HSP, talk of quiet motors and rubber-mounted frames)

    The radiators look good, especially if that rectangular vane thing is more than just style

    The pumps look awkward, but how else can you avoid Asetek’s patent? Perhaps it will be better too, after all there’s more than one way to skin a cat…

    • DPete27
    • 4 years ago

    Still using those ancient ripple hoses. No thanks.

      • Chrispy_
      • 4 years ago

      What’s wrong with them exactly? They’re kink-free and it’s not as if you get laminar flow in a smooth-bore hose either….

        • JustAnEngineer
        • 4 years ago

        Laminar flow (Reynolds number less than 2100) would be bad. It actually has more drag than turbulent flow does. You obviously want to be turbulent inside the water block and especially in the radiator to get decent heat transfer.

          • Chrispy_
          • 4 years ago

          AFAIK the only thing laminar flow in water is good for is those “jumping water” displays and fire-hoses.

          • Mr Bill
          • 4 years ago

          Rippled tubing is [url=http://www.intermetalflex.com/dokumanlar/3132014151853704.pdf<]fully turbulant[/url<] which is good for improving heat transfer. From the link... [quote<]Helical coils are characterized by their compactness and high heat transfer coefficient. When fluid flows through a helically coiled tube, the curvature of the coil induces centrifugal force, causing the development of secondary flow. This secondary flow enhances fluid mixing and thus heat transfer. [/quote<]

        • MDBT
        • 4 years ago

        They’re ugly as hell, no other reason.

          • UberGerbil
          • 4 years ago

          [url<]https://youtu.be/pWdd6_ZxX8c[/url<]

      • vargis14
      • 4 years ago

      I have Never seen a failure in the Rippled tubing, thus for a AIO cooler I do not see it factoring into the overall performance of the system. That said I am very curious to see how the radiator design works also…The reduced pressure needed to get good airflow along with better heat transfer from the veins to the fins will be interesting to see.

      I am currently Using a CM Nepton 140XL that cannot be sold in the USA anymore so I am glad I got it when I did. Sure at above 50% it gets very noisy but at 50% fan speed and below it is pretty much silent and performs a fraction less than at 100% fan. It should last me at least the rest of the life of my 2600k and probably get put onto a new build a year or 2 from now…I hope it is at least 2 years:) Before I Need a new build.
      So far no Cooler Master product has let me down.

      • Anovoca
      • 4 years ago

      Never used it for watercooling before, but had this type of tubing on my hookah and they all went to pot.

      Edit: Pun unintentional.

    • kalelovil
    • 4 years ago

    [quote<]Cooler Master says the MasterLiquid Pros' new dual-chamber design offers some advantages compared to single-chamber pumps. [/quote<] Advantage #1: Avoiding Asetek patents.

      • chuckula
      • 4 years ago

      That’s one reason you get a patent: Either get your competitors to license your stuff or force them to do something different. Sometimes forcing them to do something different results in further innovations (and they can go patent those innovations).

      • brucethemoose
      • 4 years ago

      Now with a 20% better flowrate and 99% less litigation!

    • JosiahBradley
    • 4 years ago

    Progress or result of their lawsuit? I like the new look.

      • Pwnstar
      • 4 years ago

      The lawsuit.

        • MDBT
        • 4 years ago

        Perhaps this will get a mention in the review should there be one.

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