Z410 SSDs bring a 480GB tier to SanDisk’s entry-level drives

As the cost of flash storage continues to drop, buyers are demanding larger SSD capacities for their money. With its new Z410 line, SanDisk is adding a 480GB capacity tier to its most affordable series of drives. On top of that, the new lineup offers a modest performance boost over the company's current Z400s budget SSDs.

The Z410 SSDs come in three capacities: 120GB, 240GB, and the aforementioned 480GB version. They're all SATA 6Gbps drives in a 2.5" form factor. With claimed sequential read speeds up to 535 MB/s, these drives offer similar performance to the Z400s drives. Sequential write speeds, though, improved from up to 342 MB/s in the Z400s line to up to 445 MB/s in the Z410 line. Both products have very similar random performance. The Z410 SSDs offer random reads up to 37K IOPS and random writes up to 68K IOPS. SanDisk also says that the Z410 drives include an SLC cache that purportedly improves burst write performance during typical use.

With the introduction of the Z410 lineup, SanDisk now has three lines of solid-state drives on the market using TLC flash. The X400 line offers the highest performance of the bunch, at least going by SanDisk's numbers. Distinguishing the Z400s and Z410 lines isn't quite so simple. The largest capacity in the Z400s line is 256GB, but you can get 480GB with the Z410 line. Some Z400s drives come in the M.2 form factor and offer a five-year warranty, though, while the Z410 drives are all 2.5" drives covered by a three-year warranty. 

Comments closed
    • Waco
    • 3 years ago

    I have six of the Z400s drives in a RAID 0 group. They’re plenty fast if you have a bunch of them, but a single drive is a bit pokey. Good solid drives though.

      • DPete27
      • 3 years ago

      You’re insane. 6x the chances that your array fails with no chance of recovery.

        • Waco
        • 3 years ago

        If you say so. It’s a Steam/games drive and it incrementally backs up weekly.

        Backups and long term storage are my day job, I know the risks running something like this. Heck, just yesterday I broke it down, changed the RAID card into IT mode, and switched to Windows managing the striping (so TRIM would still function).

        So yeah, recovery chances are 100%, with some wiggle room on whatever I just installed/downloaded. 🙂

    • SomeOtherGeek
    • 3 years ago

    [quote<]random reads up to 37K IOPS[/quote<] That is not so great is it...? I guess you get what you pay for.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 3 years ago

      Unless you’re running a big database cluster or something it doesn’t really matter, I don’t think. For the average user it’ll still be night and day between SSD and HDD for things like boot and app load times. Getting 480GB below $100 would be huge.

        • SomeOtherGeek
        • 3 years ago

        Yea, that would be huge! Right about the difference between SSD and HDD. I was thinking more SSD with other SSDs. I have had one for so long that I’m spoiled, so there is that.

        • Leader952
        • 3 years ago

        [quote<]Getting 480GB below $100 would be huge.[/quote<] Where are you seeing that price?

          • Ninjitsu
          • 3 years ago

          Yeah, i don’t see a price mentioned anywhere, either.

            • DPete27
            • 3 years ago

            Budget tier 480GB SSDs go for $100-$110 on sale pretty regularly here in the US.

            Heck, you can even score a more mid-tier SSD for that price now and then. Yesterday’s (or one of the days this week) newegg shell shocker was a Sandisk Ultra II 480GB for $99.99

        • south side sammy
        • 3 years ago

        true and not true. I purchased a Gskill phoenix a while back. It’ is noticeably quicker than anything else I tried.

        I have many different ssd’s. The ones off the shelf from BB work good as storage drives ( red boxed ones – sandisc ) than boot drives ( every day drivers ). And not as fast as Gskill noted.

        would I buy a “cheap” high capacity ssd for a major boot drive, Yes, I would. Just for the shear capacity alone, price second.

        I also feel at this point in time most ssd’s will be far more reliable regardless of components installed on them. The troubled years are pretty much over. Manufacturing has stabilized. 240’s just don’t cut it. and it would be nice to raid a few of these.

      • UnfriendlyFire
      • 3 years ago

      As long as an SSD has low risks of bricking itself and is faster than an HDD (I have seen a review for a laptop’s OEM SSD that had the same performance as a 5400 RPM HDD. Notebookcheck was NOT impressed and dinged a couple percentage off of the laptop’s review for that), I would prefer to buy the one with the lowest cost per GB.

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