Nvidia and Samsung settle long-running patent litigation

It's been well over two years since Nvidia tried to block all shipments of Samsung's Galaxy phones and tablets, claiming that these devices infringed on a number of Nvidia's patents. Now, it appears that the story has come to a close. According to Nvidia, the two companies have agreed to settle all pending litigation.

The settlement agreement covers cases in a number of courts. Nvidia initially filed complaints against Samsung with the U.S. District Court in Delaware and the U.S. International Trade Commision (ITC). Shortly thereafter, however, Samsung filed a countersuit with the ITC and another in an eastern Virginia district court. Samsung's lawsuits claimed that Nvidia was the infringing party. Even further, Samsung accused Nvidia of false advertisement over its claim that the Tegra K1 was, at the time, the "world's fastest mobile processor."

Last year, news came out indicating that the lawsuits weren't going so well for Team Green. In June of 2015, Nvidia backed down from some of its claims in the ITC case, stating that it no longer claimed that Samsung was infringing on a couple of its patents. Things got worse for Nvidia in December when an ITC judge determined that not only was Samsung innocent of infringing on Nvidia's patents, but that Nvidia was the party guilty of infringement.

At that time, Nvidia asked for the decision to be reviewed by a full panel of ITC judges. Yesterday's settlement decision suggests that the company was at least partially sucessful in the review process. The settlement agreement doesn't include any major cross-licensings of patents, nor any monetary judgments. Aside from licensing a couple of unspecified patents to each other, the two companies largely seem to be going their separate ways with no one the richer but their lawyers.

Comments closed
    • Chrispy_
    • 3 years ago

    Cool, time for a pop quiz.

    1) How much money did the lawyers make?
    2) Did anything productive happen at all here?

    [i<]Answers: 1) You don't want to know because It's eye-wateringly depressing, even for wealthy people. 2) Of course not.[/i<]

      • NoOne ButMe
      • 3 years ago

      It looks like it stopped Nvidia going forward with more patent suits, although it looks more like patent trolling based on the ITC rulings to me. Hopefully this is true, companies who actually make products shouldn’t be launching patent trolling suits. Actually, no company should be.

      • cygnus1
      • 3 years ago

      Quit using logic to make me sad…

    • sweatshopking
    • 3 years ago

    The entire concept of intellectual property is one I don’t like. Patents are silly and should disappear.

      • NTMBK
      • 3 years ago

      So you think inventors should not be rewarded for their inventions? That big companies should be free to come along and steal the little guy’s invention without consequence?

        • Flapdrol
        • 3 years ago

        Patents are too expensive for the little guy anyway.

        • Polum
        • 3 years ago

        “So you think inventors should not be rewarded for their inventions?”
        Ideas are not property.
        Ideas don’t grant you the moral right to assault people.
        Ideas are nothing in themselves, realizing them is the most important part.
        You want absolute control on an idea ? Keep it secret.
        Otherwise, you only want to extract money from people who actually produce.
        Intellectual property is a fallacy.

      • NoOne ButMe
      • 3 years ago

      Weakening the length of patents or requiring most to have a form of FRAND* after a relatively short length of time*? Sure! Killing patents outright? No. Please no.

      Same case with copyrights. Copyrights laws originally in the US were fine, I believe 28 years. Maybe a little long. But now it is like 10000 years and with Walt Disney using an old [s<]chip[/s<] clip in new movies they get to extend it even further. *for example, as as CPUs have so far has drastic performance increases every few years having elements of design allowing for a FRAND rate after 5 years of product hitting the market. While for a way to bind books for longer lifespan would be 5 years after the next step forward in book-binding or half the length of the patent.

      • cygnus1
      • 3 years ago

      says the guy who’s never invented anything worth selling

        • JustAnEngineer
        • 3 years ago

        [quote=”cygnus1″<] ...says the guy who's never invented anything worth [s<]selling[/s<] [b<]stealing[/b<] [/quote<] FTFY.

          • cygnus1
          • 3 years ago

          Damn good point!

    • derFunkenstein
    • 3 years ago

    [quote<] with no one the richer but their lawyers[/quote<] I love the smell of justice in the morning

      • JMccovery
      • 3 years ago

      Does it smell better than napalm?

    • NoOne ButMe
    • 3 years ago

    If a Nvidia was successful with review than they would hbas kept on going or talked about it I say. I believe the ITC rejected to I believe Nvidia would have posted that thy had a review happening.

    But for Samsung their only lawsuit fell flat: [url<]http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2016/02/samsung-patent-counter-strike-against-nvidia-falls-flat/[/url<] But turned into a war where no side had weapons. So settling before wasting millions more on lawyers made the most fiscal sense for both companies. We will know on May 12th I think.

      • chuckula
      • 3 years ago

      It looked like neither side was going to win so they called it a draw.

        • NoOne ButMe
        • 3 years ago

        Nice to see two companies realizing this instead of wasting their time, wasting courts time and paying lawyers to no reason for years on end. 😀

        Nvidia’s blogs on this subject was also very smart and they stuck to their word about keeping things up to date even if it was bad news for them. This should be praised.

    • chuckula
    • 3 years ago

    I DON’T LIKE IT WHEN YOU FIGHT!

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