AMD adds refresh-rate ranges to its FreeSync monitor page

AMD is making it easier to figure out the details of compatible monitors on its FreeSync page. A recent update added refresh-rate ranges and panel types for a large number of FreeSync monitors from Acer, LG, and Samsung, among others. AMD now includes the following details to help make picking a FreeSync monitor easier: manufacturer, model, size, panel type, resolution, refresh-rate and FreeSync range, inputs, and low-framerate-compensation support.

The FreeSync frequency range is probably the most important aspect of the monitor table, since a wider FreeSync range makes for a better tear-free gaming experience. For budget gamers whose video cards might not be up to our sweet spot recommendations, the LFC feature will probably be a feature to keep an eye out for. For all the panel-type aficionados out there, no longer will it be necessary to trudge through the depths of countless forums trying to identify the panel technology in use—AMD clearly calls it out under the LCD type column.

There are some details that leave me wanting. Interfaces don't call out protocol versions, so a determination between DisplayPort 1.2 and 1.3 isn't readily possible. The same goes for HDMI versions. Pricing and retail availability would be bonus features on the FreeSync page, too. Still, this page is a valuable resource for FreeSync monitor shoppers.

Comments closed
    • ozzuneoj
    • 4 years ago

    Do any Freesync monitors feature any kind of motion blur reduction? I know that it probably couldn’t be used at the same time as a variable refresh rate (like ULMB can’t be used with Gsync).

    IMO, motion blur from sample and hold displays should be getting a lot more attention.

    Lately I’ve been clinging to my high end CRT from 2005 after switching back to it 6 months ago and seeing just how good we used to have it.

      • DoomGuy64
      • 4 years ago

      I’ve heard rumors, but don’t know of any in particular. You lose adaptive with ULMB however, so I don’t personally see it being a necessary feature for adaptive adopters. If you [i<]really[/i<] wanted ULMB, you could instead buy a non-freesync monitor that supported ULMB. ULMB isn't that important now that modern monitors have such low persistence. TN in particular. That said, you can mod the MG279's freesync range to 60-144, and LFC will multiply lower framerate into the upper range. Doubling the refresh of 59hz and below has the side-effect of reducing motion blur so much that ULMB is not necessary even on an IPS screen. On top of that, the MG279 uses overdrive / tracefree. It's an interesting feature for sure, but at this point in time freesync combined with low persistence displays have made ULMB obsolete. Freesync is definitely the way to go, considering that you no longer have to deal with the frame drop issues of Vsync. My only complaint is that freesync modding still requires 3rd party tools like CRU, and a driver restart to initialize. AMD needs to step up and include this functionality directly in their drivers.

    • RdVi
    • 4 years ago

    Why do they have the ACER XF270HU down as being a TN panel?

    [url<]http://www.acer.com/ac/en/GB/content/model/UM.HX0EE.001[/url<] It's IPS.

      • DancinJack
      • 4 years ago

      HOW CAN WE TRUST THIS CHART??????

      • DPete27
      • 4 years ago

      Should be AHVA

        • brucethemoose
        • 4 years ago

        Which is just IPS, despite the VA-sounding name.

      • Jury-Pool-Reject
      • 4 years ago

      For my new gaming Mini-ITX rig… (Asus Z170I Pro Gaming MB/i7-6700k/Corsair 3x8GB LPX Mem/EVGA ver of the 1080, in June/July I guess/EVGA SuperNova GS650 PS/Fractal Core 500 case/ with either the Acer 27″ XB271HU or the Asus 27″ PG279Q.

      So hooked on this hobby of computers and gaming, and I’m an old bastard as well… less excusable, or more excusable? Hmm….

    • sweatshopking
    • 4 years ago

    The entire monitor industry sucks. No consumers know what the hell they’re buying, and what the advantages/disadvantages of one tech, price point, or resolution are. It’s a mess, and needs a complete overhaul

      • anotherengineer
      • 4 years ago

      Indeed. IMHO every monitor should have a sticker with this info on the back

      Panel Manufacturer –
      Panel Model/Part Number –
      Manf Date –
      Panel Type –
      Viewing Angles –
      Color Depth –
      Std Resolution –
      Std Refresh rate –
      Screen Coating – 0=none gloss, 10 = full grainy anti-glare
      Min/Max Refresh Rate –
      Connector Version/Revision –
      Typical Response Time –
      Typical Input Lag –
      PPI –
      Options – G-Sync, FreeSync, ULB, Scaling, Factory calibration, etc. etc.

      I find it annoying how you get all those specs or can easily get them for a PC, but it’s either a PITA or impossible with a monitor. Is a sticker to much to ask for, seriously!?!?!

        • ColeLT1
        • 4 years ago

        Your ideas are intriguing to me and I wish to subscribe to your newsletter.

          • sweatshopking
          • 4 years ago

          IT CAN BE FOUND AT [url<]http://WWW.SSKISTHEBESTALLWORSHIPHIM.COM[/url<] THOUGH IT MAY CURRENTLY BE DOWN.

            • LostCat
            • 4 years ago

            Welcome back, Capslock Knight. Your adventures elsewhere must’ve been very interesting.

            • anotherengineer
            • 4 years ago

            Ummmmmmmmmmmmmm

            He was replying to my post, not yours 😉 So you will have to use 2nd best 🙂

            • sweatshopking
            • 4 years ago

            I KNEW HE WAS REPLYING TO YOU. YOU’RE JUST A REALLY BIG FAN OF MINE, AND THAT’S THE URL YOU PAY FOR.

            • anotherengineer
            • 4 years ago

            Shhhhhhhh Don’t wanna get Deanjo jealous 😉

          • VinnyC
          • 4 years ago

          omg someone else who uses this line! Finally! We’re now brothers.

        • Chrispy_
        • 4 years ago

        Even if it was far less than that, the three specs that are hardest to find could do with being standardized, so that they’re at least something you don’t have to go on a search-roulette marathon to find :\

        [list][*]Panel Type (look, okay, we know it’s probably TN because you’re not boasting otherwise).
        [*]G2G pixel response time.
        [*]Input lag at the quoted G2G response time.

          • f0d
          • 4 years ago

          a lot of the information you can find out through some searching but i have found sometimes you just cant find out the input response time anywhere for some monitors

            • Chrispy_
            • 4 years ago

            This. Input lag is something that even a lot of reviews seem to skip, despite half of the monitors being “gaming” monitors.

            /facepalm.

        • Wirko
        • 4 years ago

        Plus some info in fine print, like, “IGZO is not intended to replace IPS”.

        • the
        • 4 years ago

        You’re also forgetting a few things:

        Scalar model/part number
        Interpolated color depth
        3D support
        SST/MST
        Panel Self refresh support
        Backlight technology (WLED, RBG LED etc.)
        Firmware revision

        In other words, there are a lot of variables for a monitor and I think listing all of them is a big of a burden. It wouldn’t hurt to require all of this in a manual isn’t too bad but to the average consumer it would be overwhelming. (Remember most consumers don’t even look at a manual.) I would consider the [url=https://www.ftc.gov/tips-advice/business-center/guidance/ftc-lighting-facts-label-questions-answers-manufacturers<]usage information found on light bulbs[/url<] as a template to provide standard for getting key information to consumers without overwelming them.

          • Parallax
          • 4 years ago

          Don’t forget backlight flicker frequency/amplitude.

      • UnfriendlyFire
      • 4 years ago

      Because it’s profitable to convince consumers to keep buying garbage 768p TN displays, charge an arm for a “better” garbage display that has larger physical dimensions, and an arm-and-an-leg for an actual quality monitor.

      For the laptop displays, I recall reading how the OEM price between a 768p TN and a 1080p ISP display is only about $10. Of course if you do get an 1080p upgrade option for the laptop, it’s going to be $50 to $200.

      • Duct Tape Dude
      • 4 years ago

      Well hey, welcome back!

        • sweatshopking
        • 4 years ago

        <3

          • biffzinker
          • 4 years ago

          “Top Comment” from ssk? Didn’t expect that to happen 🙂

    • jensend
    • 4 years ago

    AMD really needs to help there be some better way of marketing monitors that have ranges allowing for LFC.

    If someone buys a monitor because it says FreeSync but it only does 40-60Hz like about a dozen of those do, they’re going to be missing out quite a bit compared to a monitor that manages to do even just 30-75Hz.

      • delsydsoftware
      • 4 years ago

      I have an LG 4k monitor with 40-60hz freesync and a FuryX, and that 40-60hz helps a lot with smoothing out 4k gaming. 30hz+ freesync would be nice, to be sure, but it’s still worth it.

    • cygnus1
    • 4 years ago

    I wonder if Scott helped push this info out.

      • Firestarter
      • 4 years ago

      based scott

    • EndlessWaves
    • 4 years ago

    Why would you need to know the interface version on the monitor? Does DisplayPort 1.3 add anything to adaptive sync?

      • tsk
      • 4 years ago

      No, it’s the same as DP1.2A

      • Raymond Page
      • 4 years ago

      My thoughts are that if you’re daisy chaining DisplayPort enabled monitors, it might matter if you have the DP1.3’s 50% bandwidth improvement for high res (4K) displays. However I didn’t dig into it to identify if its truly relevant.

    • DPete27
    • 4 years ago

    Finally. Thank you AMD

    • DragonDaddyBear
    • 4 years ago

    That’s really neat, but I wish they would have added filters.

      • gc9
      • 4 years ago

      To DYI: Copy/paste can keep HTML tables, spreadsheets can filter and sort. So:
      [list=1<] [*<] Select all the table cells, including the column headings. [/*<][*<] Copy (ctrl-C). [/*<][*<] Open a new spreadsheet (such as LibreOffice Calc, used below). [/*<][*<] Paste all at once at the top-left cell (ctrl-V), so the column headings are in the first row. [/*<][*<] Adjust column widths for data: Select-all (ctrl-A), menu: Format/Column.../Optimal-width. [/*<][*<] Click the spreadsheet auto-filter button (or via menu: Data/Auto-filter), and see the column heading cells change appearance (drop-down triangles). [/*<][*<] Click on a spreadsheet column heading cell to get popup controls to [/*<][*<] filter rows by values in that column, and/or [/*<][*<] sort rows by the values in that column. [/*<] [/list<]

        • DragonDaddyBear
        • 4 years ago

        If you were wondering, yes, I do know how to use Excel and Libre/Open Office Calc. I think it is more work than someone should need to do if they visit that site trying to make a decision on which Free Sync monitor to buy. It’s not much of a research/purchasing tool without the ability to filter and help a potential customer make decisions.

    • dragontamer5788
    • 4 years ago

    This LFC feature was the only real reason GSync remained technically superior to FreeSync.

    I’d love it if LFC were tested by somebody 🙂 Please, pretty please?

      • Raymond Page
      • 4 years ago

      Looking at their pictures, I’d guess that its doubling frames all the way down to 15Hz to get a 30Hz rate.

      • DoomGuy64
      • 4 years ago

      All LFC does is multiply your framerate to push fps below the freesync range into the freesync range. That means you can mod your MG279 to 144hz, and not worry about the higher minimum. Also, in terms of reducing image blur, this probably works better than gsync, provided you’re forcing 30-40 fps to refresh @ 60 or higher.

        • dragontamer5788
        • 4 years ago

        That’s what GSync did.

        And I understand the concept, except FreeSync doesn’t track “FPS”, it tracks “delay to next frame”. Beforehand, FreeSync would tell the monitor “double-the-previous frame at minimum delay”. IE: if you had a 30-to-90HZ monitor, FreeSync and 15Hz was “needed”, FreeSync’s specifications only allow the GPU to say “repeat next frame update in 11.1ms” (1/90) until 66ms went by (66ms is 1/15).

        Where things went wrong was 20HZ (a 50ms delay). FreeSync’s implementation would retain the 11.1ms for all repeated frames (90Hz is the max of the monitor in this example), which would lead to a 22.2ms delay.

        It sounds like the programming may be smarter than just “choose the max”. Maybe FreeSync now implements 20Hz as two 25ms delays (40Hz signal twice).

        All hypothetical of course, which is why I’d like someone to test it.

      • tay
      • 4 years ago

      Only half the Freesync monitors have LFC. Too bad.

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