Thermalright Le Grand Macho RT makes other coolers look wimpy

It's no secret that companies love preying on consumers' insecurities about size—whether it's for height, trucks, or body appendages. The mean folks at Thermalright have joined that party by trying to make us all feel bad about the inadequacy of our CPU coolers. Enter the Le Grand Macho RT CPU cooler—all 2 lbs (900g) of it.

The Macho RT measures 4.7" by 5.9" by 6.2" (W x L x H), or 120mm by 150mm by 159mm. The heatsink's 35 fins are 0.4-mm thick and spaced at 3.1 mm intervals. A total of seven 6-mm heatpipes grace the Macho's underside, all tying into a nickel-plated C1100 copper base. Despite the heatsink's massive size, Thermalright took steps to ensure that the Macho doesn't pose clearance problems with motherboard components or memory.

The area around the copper base offers 1.73" (44 mm) of clearance. The lower fins in the heatsinks's back section are shorter than the upper ones, leaving 2.1" (54 mm) underneath, enough to fit most DIMMs. As an added bonus, the mounting system includes a backplate and screws, because really, who doesn't hate push-pin mounting systems with a passion?

Thermalright sells the Macho RT with a TY-147B 140-mm fan, rated for a range of 300 to 1300 RPM and capable of up to 73.6 CFM of airflow. The fan adds another 0.35lbs (160g) to the weight of the whole set. The Le Grand Macho RT should be available in stores immediately for $68.24 (60€). Users can purchase a second fan separately. Thermalright offers the TY 127 fan for $10.24 (9€) and the TY 141SV model for $18.20 (16€).

Comments closed
    • ray890
    • 4 years ago

    How would this cooler compare with the Noctua NH-D15?

    • Arclight
    • 4 years ago

    It’s as if the “Le” prefix meme has just reached corporate and it’s the “fresh” new thing.

    • Shobai
    • 4 years ago

    Bruno,

    I appreciate the effort you went to in providing an alternate unit for almost every value throughout – any chance you could do that for the third paragraph [on clearance] also?

      • morphine
      • 4 years ago

      Thanks for pointing out the omission. I’ve added a few millimeters 🙂

        • Shobai
        • 4 years ago

        Thanks mate, much obliged

    • puppetworx
    • 4 years ago

    $80 on air cooling is excessive. You’re barely going to get better temperatures than from a $40 cooler and double radiator AIO water coolers can be had for that price, which will beat this.

    I love Thermalright though, really great performance coolers and the one time I had a problem they sent me a replacement part next day delivery and included some Haribo Goldbears to boot! That’s how you win my loyalty.

    For those concerned about weight I’ve had several 1Kg+ heat sinks without any issue whatsoever. However if you’re going to moving your system around a lot it wouldn’t be advisable, every jolt is going to stress the motherboard harshly.

      • chri1753
      • 4 years ago

      High-end air cooling still wins on the noise level at idle and near-idle, though, as well as on reliability.

      • GeForce6200
      • 4 years ago

      While i think that $80 is the upper limit for most consumers on air I will still take air>water for the most part. A good cpu air cooler will remain relatively quiet under load and have almost little point of failure. Agreed that most AIO water coolers will perform better than an air cooler the high end air will hold their own. TekSyndicate’s rig has a FX9590 on air (huge Noctua) and it provided the same or better results and quieter than a 240MM corsair AIO. Hopefully Thermalright brings this to the US market. I have been seeing less and less of their products be available.

      • Deanjo
      • 4 years ago

      [quote<]$80 on air cooling is excessive. You're barely going to get better temperatures than from a $40 cooler and double radiator AIO water coolers can be had for that price, which will beat this.[/quote<] Except that air cooling tends to be more reliable, especially when you are comparing those cheap AIO water coolers which tend to die in a few years. I have yet to have one of those AIO's survive for more than 2 years. Meanwhile the old Thermalright 120 keeps going and going and going and if the fan ever need replacing, it is less than $10 to replace it.

    • Forge
    • 4 years ago

    Coolermaster Hyper 212. Cheap, effective, flexible.

      • Shigura
      • 4 years ago

      Cryorig H7.

    • Milo Burke
    • 4 years ago

    Looks like something out of Mad Max: Fury Road.

    • DrCR
    • 4 years ago

    Thermalright is always awesome, often along with Scythe options.

    • crystall
    • 4 years ago

    They seriously called this thing “Le Grand Macho RT” O_o

    A long time ago I had an XP-90 which was a great heatsink, and I’m sure their products are every bit as good as they were back in the day, but the names of their products could seriously use some improvements.

      • Chrispy_
      • 4 years ago

      XP-90 and Ultra-120 owner here.

      I think what you really want is a Gigabyte GH-PDU21-MF as that just rolls off the tongue….

    • Generic
    • 4 years ago

    Finally! A vendor puts out a competent heat sink for AMD ahead of product launch.

    Seriously, where’s the hole template and shims so we can secure it to the case panel?

    • Chrispy_
    • 4 years ago

    2.35lbs mounted on a board? Er no thanks.

    Corsair, Coolermaster, NZXT, Silverstone all make liquid coolers for less than this that would probably perform similarly without the risk of cracking your motherboard in transit.

    • drfish
    • 4 years ago

    Bruno keeps tempting me to jump on a 6700K – not sure if I would get something like this to cool it or go for a Corsair H115i instead… Hmm…

      • sweatshopking
      • 4 years ago

      don’t bother. Your cpu is plenty fast enough.

        • chuckula
        • 4 years ago

        #486DX2_4evah

      • morphine
      • 4 years ago

      Skylake, Skylake, you make my heart ache.
      Skylake, Skylake, games smooth as silk and cake.

      (that’s the official Skylake song)

      • Srsly_Bro
      • 4 years ago

      I have a new in box h80i GT. When I rma’d it, I replaced it with a traditional tower hsf. It will most likely sit in the box until I sell it.

    • Anovoca
    • 4 years ago

    I’m curious if that leaning causes the weight to be uneven, and if so, how much stress would that put on the socket.

      • Deanjo
      • 4 years ago

      I wouldn’t think so. I have a Thermalright ultra extreme copper that weighs in at twice the weight (1900 grams) and it sits even and flat.

      Edit: Even the original 120 was 790 grams

    • thor84no
    • 4 years ago

    There’s simply no circumstances where I’d pick this over a liquid cooling solution. I’ve had enough problems with huge coolers – one nearly broke my motherboard during transportation, and I almost always had to reseat the cooler after moving the machine by car.

      • Zizy
      • 4 years ago

      Big coolers generally go in big boxes which generally aren’t transported around.

      There is simply no circumstances where I’d pick an of the shelf (AIO) liquid cooling solution over this. The thingy has a single cheap point of failure – fans. Liquid cooling has way more points of failure which are much costlier.

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