Deals of the week: Asus’ MG278Q display for $390 and more

Welcome to another Friday deals of the week, the only lucky place to be on this Friday the 13th. Just like every Friday, we’ll be sharing some of the best deals in quality tech goodies. Take a look.

  • A returning favorite of our deals-of-the-week, Asus’ MG278Q display has dropped to $389.99 again. This 27” display has a 144-Hz, 2560×1440 TN panel and FreeSync support. We recommended the MG278Q in our Peripherals Guide at $570, so it’s an easy buy at $389.99.

     

  • Intel’s Core i7-6700 CPU is $296.99 on Newegg right now. This is the captain of the locked Skylake CPU team, and it's among the best processors a gamer can buy today. If you’re looking for a top-end gaming or productivity CPU and you aren’t interested in overclocking it, the Core i7-6700 might be just the thing for you.

     

  • Next up, we have the MSI Gaming Z170A-G45 motherboard, which Newegg is selling for $129.99 (or $119.99 after a $10 mail-in-rebate). The Z170A-G45 has all the bells and whistles we’d expect from a Z170 motherboard in this price range: three PCIe x16 slots, two M.2 slots, a Killer E2400 network controller, a USB 3.1 Type-C port, and a USB 3.1 Type-A port.

     

  • If the MSI motherboard above doesn't do it for you, don't despair— we have another sweet motherboard deal. The Gigabyte GA-Z170X-Gaming 3 is $119.99, or $109.99 after a $10 mail-in rebate. For $10 less than the MSI board above, the Gigabyte board offers the same three PCIe x16 slots, two M.2 slots, one USB 3.1 Type-C port, and one USB 3.1 Type-A port. The Gigabyte board features a less-fancy Killer E2201 network controller, though.

     

  • Let’s move on to a couple of storage deals. If you are in need of some 2.5” storage, the ‘Egg has Seagate’s ST1000LM014 1TB 2.5” hybrid drive up for $69.99 with promo code ESCEJF27. While it won’t be able to keep up with similarly sized SSDs, this drive should offer a decent performance boost over non-hybrid hard drives.

     

  • Here’s a strange one for you thrill seekers out there. Newegg is offering a generic 6TB 5700RPM hard drive with a one-year warranty for $149.95. We're usually pretty leery of unproven brands, but this drive is significantly cheaper than branded disks. The cheapest name-brand 6TB hard drive Newegg offers is $204.99.

     

  • Last up, we have G.Skill's TridentZ 32GB DDR4-3000 RAM kit for $164.99. We particularly like this kit not just because it's the cheapest 32GB DDR4-3000 kit out there right now, but also because it's one of the nicer-looking memory kits on the market.

There's a chance you're looking for something we haven't covered. If that's the case, you can help The Tech Report by using the following referral links when you're out shopping: not only do we have a partnership with Newegg, but we also work with Best Buy, Adorama, RakutenWalmart, and Sam's Club. For more specific needs, you can also shop with our links at the Microsoft Store, the HP Store, and Das Keyboard's shop.

That's all for this week, folks. If we missed a great deal somewhere, be sure to share it with other TR readers in the comments.

Comments closed
    • Srsly_Bro
    • 4 years ago

    That’s a nice price on that monitor. If it was G-Sync and VA or IPS, I’d be interested.

      • travbrad
      • 4 years ago

      I was going to say “in before complaints about TN displays” but it’s too late. Thanks for not letting me down TR comments section. 🙂

      As I’ve said in other posts VRR isn’t a must-have feature IMO. It feels a bit better at low frame rates than without VRR, but it’s better to just get good framerates in the first place. Honestly it might be better to just spend that extra $100 on the next tier up GPU and get a normal 144hz monitor. Of course if you can afford both then that would be the way to go.

      Needing VRR for low framerates sort of seems like a problem created by buying monitors with resolutions too high for the graphics card you own. The easiest solution is just to not get that 4K or 1440p display (depending what GPU you have) in the first place.

        • Sputnik7
        • 4 years ago

        This is my struggle as well. I think I’m going the “better GPU” route instead of “fix with G-Sync/Freesync” with my dollars.

        • Chrispy_
        • 4 years ago

        Adaptive sync is not just about low-framerates though, it’s about animation fluidity and input-lag reduction.

        Even when I’m using vsync and getting 60fps without ever dropping a frame, there are hitches that [i<]feel[/i<] like a dropped frame, because the time the frame completed rendering isn't necessarily the same time that the monitor is ready to display the next frame. Even at 85Hz it's pretty obvious because the silkier the motion is, the more jarring a deviation from that becomes.

          • travbrad
          • 4 years ago

          Yeah that is true it has other advantages not just at low framerates, but I think the most noticeable advantages can be seen there. I never used Vsync on 60hz monitors because the input lag has always been atrocious for me. Of course not using Vsync causes tearing and can still have hitches (which is another thing VRR fixes).

          Just having a higher refresh rate seems to improve most of this stuff though. If your monitor is refreshing more than twice as fast those frames from the GPU will tend to “line up” better with the display being refreshed. At high framerates the difference between Gsync on and off on my 144hz display is marginal (to the point it could even be placebo). I’m still glad I have Gsync for Planetside 2 (my most played game) though, because the framerates in that can vary from 50-150FPS depending on how big of a battle you are in. Most games have much more consistent framerates than Planetside 2 however.

            • DarkUltra
            • 4 years ago

            True it could be placebo, but I swear Battlefield 3 is so much smoother and responsive with G-Sync. I get around 100-120 fps on my 144Hz Asus ROG Swift.

        • Srsly_Bro
        • 4 years ago

        I’m not worried about the cost. I was planning on a Pascal Titan and a g sync monitor.

    • crabjokeman
    • 4 years ago

    I can’t remember the last time we had a DotW without an SSD deal. I don’t pay real close attention though and my short term memory isn’t what it was many years and many beers ago, so don’t skewer me if it was two weeks ago or something..

    • meerkt
    • 4 years ago

    Since when do unbranded HDDs exist?

      • nanoflower
      • 4 years ago

      Reading the review it looks like they are actually WD HDs. Not sure why WD would be selling unbranded HDs but maybe these didn’t pass their specs for the drives they do sell or they overproduced what the market wanted?

        • w76
        • 4 years ago

        Does WD have any outsource manufacturers (past or present)? If so, they could be dumping these on the side themselves.

          • meerkt
          • 4 years ago

          The HDD market was never something small players could get into. Not in recent history anyway. If anything, there are less manufacturers than brand names.

          The only unknown player I recall is/was ExcelStor.

        • magila
        • 4 years ago

        Both WD and Seagate sell “white lable” HDDs to OEMs who resell them under their own brands. You mostly see this with the big OEMs like HP, Dell, IBM, etc. I’d be a bit wary of white label drives from a no-name OEM like this. There’s a good chance these are “bottom of the barrel” drives with marginal heads and platters.

        • Chrispy_
        • 4 years ago

        They definitely look like WD’s to me with the black rounded plate under the sticker

        Only WD and Toshiba use 5700RPM (Seagate uses 5900RPM), and they look nothing like Toshibas.

        I doubt it’s a failed-spec reason, given the quantities I’m seeing these in. More likely some vast data centre cancelled an order for half a million drives that had already been made to a specific spec, and that spec doesn’t match up with WD’s own products nor is it enough to create a new product model for general sale.

        Dump on the market cheap with minimum warranty/support and it doesn’t undercut their models with 3yr/5yr warranties.

      • w76
      • 4 years ago

      Edit: Ninja’d by nano.

      • Voldenuit
      • 4 years ago

      They’ve existed for a while. Often, they are no-name Chinese hard drives, but looks like the major hard disk ODMs are in on it, too.

    • DPete27
    • 4 years ago

    Trident Z link points to the 6TB hdd.

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