Toshiba thins its OCZ SSD offerings

After OCZ declared bankruptcy in 2013, Toshiba purchased the company and gave it a new lease on life. OCZ continued to produce a full line of SSDs under its new management, including SATA and NVMe drives for the consumer and enterprise markets. Today, however, Toshiba appears to be retiring the OCZ name on all but a few of its consumer SSDs.

Tom’s Hardware pointed out yesterday that Toshiba has made a massive overhaul of the OCZ website. Now, the only SSDs listed on the site are an entry-level SSD and an enthusiast-class drive. The entry-level drive, the OCZ TR150, looks to be a rebadge of the recently-released OCZ Trion 150, and the enthusiast VT180 is probably a rebadged Vector 180. The RD400 PCIe SSD that was announced last year is still listed as "coming soon" on the company's page, too.

The specs of the TR150 are about the same as those of the Trion 150, although OCZ lists the TR150's random write IOPs at up to 85k, substantially higher than the Trion 150's 64k figure. The VT180 appears to be cut from the same cloth as the Vector 180. The VT180's specs are almost equal to the Vector 180, aside from slight bumps in random read and write IOPS. The minor differences in performance between the old SSDs and the new ones are most likely due to firmware tweaks since the drives' release rather than changes under the hood.

OCZ's enterprise drives are absent from the updated Toshiba site. Toshiba already has a strong presence in the enterprise SSD market, and it's likely dropping the OCZ name to unify the company's products behind the stronger brand. The OCZ site doesn’t show listings for any other SSDs, and all other OCZ SSDs are labeled as “legacy” on the OCZ drivers site—even the Trion 150 and Vector 180. 

Comments closed
    • FubbHead
    • 3 years ago

    And why people still trust Samsung after the 840 Evo fiasco is beyond me.. Next time they screw up, you know what to expect.

    At least OCZ owned up to their failures, at least in my experience..

    • questionlp
    • 3 years ago

    Could it be that the drives being discontinued are ones that use NAND devices that are no longer manufactured? I thought I read somewhere that Toshiba was phasing out some (maybe all?) of their 19nm NAND.

    • EndlessWaves
    • 3 years ago

    So there’s now an official TR range of SSDs?

    How much of a cut do you guys get from each sale? 😉

    • derFunkenstein
    • 3 years ago

    So why did Toshiba buy OCZ again? Just for Indilinx? And did that really ever produce anything? (edit: I guess it produced the Vector 180)

      • Chrispy_
      • 3 years ago

      They bought a controller company so that they had in-house expertise on firmware and controller design, as well as Indilinx’s IP.

      Even if they ditched all the Indliinx products from their lineup, they now have a team of experienced staff who can take Toshiba’s new NAND and either design themselves an in-house controller, or write in-house firmware for another controller like Silicon Motion or Marvell. It’s a big leap toward vertical integration, something that only Samsung, Intel and SK Hynix (they bought Link-A-Media) can boast.

    • DrCR
    • 3 years ago

    I’m still amazed the OCZ brand is worth anything at all in the mind of anyone, though I do acknowledge at this point it has changed hands so many times over the years that it’s simply not the same as what I associate with it.

      • jessterman21
      • 3 years ago

      You’re absolutely right – I think they made a mistake here.

      I’d be much more eager to buy a Toshiba VT180 or TR150 if the price is right, but the OCZ name sullies it for me…

      • DPete27
      • 3 years ago

      OCZ SSDs were fine IMO. I can’t speak for their other products though.

        • EndlessWaves
        • 3 years ago

        They had pretty massive failure rates towards the end. IIRC the worst models had something like 20-30% of drives failing within a few years.

          • DarkMikaru
          • 3 years ago

          Hell, and in some product lines upwards of 60 – 70% failure!!!

          [url<]http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820227779&nm_mc=EMC-IGNEFL030812&cm_mmc=EMC-IGNEFL030812-_-EMC-030812-Index-_-SSD-_-20227779-L02B[/url<] [url<]http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820227780[/url<] Granted... that was in 2012 I think, so 4yrs ago. But with failure rates so high you can't really fault someone for writing them off all together. Bring bought by Toshiba, a reputable brand I'm sure has done wonders.

        • tootercomputer
        • 3 years ago

        I had some OCZ memory and it was fine. But my very first SSD was an OCZ Vector 3 or something, positively reviewed by TR, and I had to RMA it as it blue screened from the get go. Replaced it with a Kingston that still works to this day.

          • DPete27
          • 3 years ago

          My first SSD was a Vertex 3 also. I bought it November 2011 after the industry got the whole [url=https://techreport.com/news/21858/ocz-firmware-update-battles-sandforce-bsod-bug<]Sandforce BSOD bug sorted out[/url<] (which was ultimately placed on OCZs shoulders/reputation). I never had any issues with it. It's still going strong to this day. Not trying to stir up anything. I know this topic has been beaten to death.

            • ColeLT1
            • 3 years ago

            Same here, got the vertex 3 on sale (11/28/2011) after they released the fixed firmware. Still going today. OCZ had first dibs on the sandforce 2281 controller, and first dibs on the issues.

            I think we were lucky though, the RMA process was supposedly impossibly complicated and poorly managed.

        • blahsaysblah
        • 3 years ago

        two OCZ Arc 100 SSDs. They suck.

        Compile Unreal Engine 4 editor?, backup a large VHDX file? Get random hangs of 15-30 secs. No corruption, just complete halts. Over heating or garbage collection or both. (Drive not even 50% full)

        Intel and Samsung are the only manufacturers I would trust for OS drive.

        Luckily my OS drive is trusty 80GB Intel X-25M G2 drive from launch. Maybe slow, but that slow is consistently delivered no matter what.

          • Chrispy_
          • 3 years ago

          [quote<]Intel and Samsung are the only manufacturers I would trust for OS drive[/quote<] Millions trusted Samsung and ended up with an 840 or 840 EVO to their dismay. The Arc 100 has fantastic reviews all over the web and holds up well under torture. You either have a faulty cable, a faulty motherboard, a faulty drive, or faulty software.

            • Ninjitsu
            • 3 years ago

            Yeah, I ended up with an 840. If I have some money left over after travelling in July, I’ll probably replace it with a 512GB drive and make it a scratch disk of some sort. Although I think I’m out of SATA ports XD

      • anotherengineer
      • 3 years ago

      Toshiba should just drop the OCZ moniker completely.

        • blahsaysblah
        • 3 years ago

        To me, OCZ is same as AMD (not ATI/Radeon). Same first hand experience.

          • derFunkenstein
          • 3 years ago

          I dunno, man. I’ve only ever had an AMD CPU just outright fail on me when I crushed its core with an insane heatsink clip that had previously pulled a tab right off the socket. Reusing that cooler was my mistake, not AMD’s.

            • blahsaysblah
            • 3 years ago

            I didnt say OCZ ssd failed or corrupted my data.

            Just had random 15-30 seconds hangs during large copies or compiles. Making it so i cant trust the drives to store anything other than temporary data.

            Same experience with my AMD system. Not outright failure. Just random issues, constant driver headaches. Im not going to blame anyone other than AMD. They should not have certified vendors to make supporting chips for their systems without any compatibility tests.

            • anotherengineer
            • 3 years ago

            Nvidia chipset?? 😉

            • derFunkenstein
            • 3 years ago

            You can’t weasel around like that, man. OCZ is world-renowned for its outright component failures. Equating them to AMD is actually an enormous insult to AMD.

      • Chrispy_
      • 3 years ago

      Despite the negativity on forums from:[list<] [*<]the vocal minority who were screwed over by the Sandforce bug [/*<][*<]those who bought the terrible OCZ drives before they were bought out (Petrol, Octane drives that had high - like 40% high - RMA rates)[/*<][/list<] ...the majority of OCZ customers were happy. I'd be willing to say that 80% of [i<]"old, bad, sloppy OCZ"[/i<] customers never had a single problem with their drive. Not only that, but even whilst the bad drives were failing, the bulk of OCZ's products were actually getting good reviews and selling at very competitive rates. As toshiba, the historic reviews of the Vertex 3, Vectors and Arcs are all very positive. It is only among the enthusiast minority that OCZ has a bad rep at all, and even there the bad rep is only from people who don't know that the Toshiba-built OCZ drives are very good and have a reliable track record. Toshiba owns the brand name, it does have a whole bunch of positive reviews and a general track record of decent performance. For the few who don't like OCZ they are also selling Toshiba branded SSDs so what's the problem?

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