Cryorig teases a distinctive pair of Mini-ITX cases

Computex 2016 starts next week, and news is trickling in about the hardware that'll be on display at the trade fair. Cryorig has teased two PC cases it currently has in development. The first is the Ola, a cylindrical Mini-ITX case, and the second is the Taku, a space-saving Mini-ITX case that doubles as a monitor stand.

The Ola's cylindrical design allows Cryorig to accomplish some interesting things. The company claims that the shape both increases the internal air volume and ensures that there's no dead space in the case where air doesn't move. Two air intake ducts run along the sides of the case, and a 140-mm fan at the top exhausts air from both of the case's compartments. The case is only compatible with Mini-ITX motherboards and SFX power supplies, but it can accommodate graphics cards as long as 11" (280 mm). The Ola has one 3.5" drive bay and one 2.5" drive bay. Builders will be able to pick from glossy black, brushed aluminum, and wood veneer panels for this case when it hits the market.

The Taku is a rectangular Mini-ITX case designed to take up minimal desk space. The all-aluminum chassis provides access to the hardware inside with a sliding drawer system. Users can route cords through ducts along the sides of the case and out one of two notches on the top, allowing them to connect peripherals and phones to the computer while hiding those cords. Once again, the case only fits Mini-ITX motherboards and SFX power supplies. The Taku also won't be able to house graphics cards longer than 11" (240 mm). Like the Ola, the Taku has one 3.5" drive bay and one 2.5" drive bay. Solid wood legs provide structural support and visual contrast.

Cryorig considers both of these cases to be works in progress, but it'll have functional demos on display at Computex. The company hopes to release the Taku later this year or early in 2017, and has the Ola targeted for release in the second quarter of 2017.

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    • Khali
    • 4 years ago

    I like the looks of the Taku. It’s lacking in several areas for it to be of use to me as is though. I have been looking all over for an old style PC XT/AT case for a long while now. I personally need room for a optical drive, yes I use one daily, and a full size GPU. Room for 4 to 6 SSD’s and a single HDD would be a bonus. The current crop of HTPC cases just don’t make the grade

    In short a full sized ATX version, with room for a full sized power supply, would be right up my alley.

      • Airmantharp
      • 4 years ago

      Have you tried Silverstone?

        • Khali
        • 4 years ago

        Indeed I have given Silverstone a look. The Grandia Series GD08 comes closest to what I want. It’s at the top of my list for when I decide to go ahead with a new system. Not a big fan of its looks/all black coloring though.

    • RdVi
    • 4 years ago

    These actually look practical, understated and still very attractive. Take note all other case makers – less ‘gaming’ cases please.

      • strangerguy
      • 4 years ago

      And less “ITX” wannabes approaching a full size ATX cases in terms of total volume occupied.

    • RoxasForTheWin
    • 4 years ago

    If their cases are anything like their cpu coolers, this is gonna be great

    • kamikaziechameleon
    • 4 years ago

    The cylinder is sweet! Always thought we’d one day arrive at something like that.

    • cegras
    • 4 years ago

    The cylindrical case looks really good.

    > and a 140-mm fan at the top exhausts air from both of the case’s compartments.

    Shame about negative pressure though – leads to more dust in the case.

      • tipoo
      • 4 years ago

      I wonder, did the Mac Pros get dusty in the last 3 years? That would be the ideal test case of this kind of design, it’s been out for a while and has the same top exhausting method.

      My rMBP 15″ was filthy inside though, those side vents let in a lot. I’m not one to let my computers vacuum up a carpet or blanket either.

        • davidbowser
        • 4 years ago

        My Mac Pro sits on my desk behind a monitor. I can confirm that it gets dusty around the base, but I have not bothered to open it up to see what the insides look like.

    • shaurz
    • 4 years ago

    The dimensions for the OLA listed on the linked page make no sense, so I calculated from the pixels in the image using the size of the mini-ITX board (17x17cm) that the height is roughly 40cm and width 21cm.

      • DPete27
      • 4 years ago

      Really?…. you calculated from the pixels?….

      My good ‘ol “hold a ruler up to the screen” method agrees with your estimate.

        • shaurz
        • 4 years ago

        Yes, the mini-ITX board measured 240 pixels across. The real board is 170mm across, so that works out as 170/240 = 0.708333… mm per pixel. Measure the other dimensions in pixels and multiply them by 170/240 to convert back to mm.

          • jihadjoe
          • 4 years ago

          /respect

          • Dudeface
          • 4 years ago

          Hmm, I’m wondering if a 120mm AIO water cooler would fit at the top. My early guesstimate is probably not? Scratch that… now I’m almost 100% sure it wouldn’t

    • Timbrelaine
    • 4 years ago

    The Taku is kinda ugly to my eyes, but I would kill to be able to access the inside of my case by just opening a drawer. I hope the idea catches on.

    • Wonders
    • 4 years ago

    Who are Cryorig? Have we heard of them before?

      • EndlessWaves
      • 4 years ago

      Their mid-range CPU coolers like the H7 are becoming fairly popular.

    • tviceman
    • 4 years ago

    Extremely interested in the OLA. It looks like it’ll be about 12″ high, if the diameter is nice and tight fitting then I’m all in!

      • EndlessWaves
      • 4 years ago

      Yeah, it’s definitely the nicest looking of the cylindrical cases announced recently like the Dune case and whatever MSI’s gamer monstrosity was called.

      It is substantially taller though, Hexus reported a preliminary height of 37.85cm (14.9″) compared with the 26cm of the Dune. Other dimensions were 22.6cm x 20.5cm. If we average them together as a diameter that gives us a volume of 13.8L.

      It’ll be interesting to see how they handle all the challenges like the I/O panel though (hopefully route the cables internally to the bottom of the case), and how the wood veneer panels work with that angular top cover.

      • blahsaysblah
      • 4 years ago

      The [url=https://www.dan-cases.com/<]A4-SFX[/url<] is better in every way. Unless this was designed with noise isolation,... whats the point instead of the A4_SFX case?

        • tviceman
        • 4 years ago

        The A4 is going to cost $225-250 plus shipping, and relies on component fans for cooling. The OLA will probably cost half that, not have crazy shipping costs, and will have better cooling with its 140mm exhaust creating positive pressure.

          • blahsaysblah
          • 4 years ago

          Where is the PS exhausting in the OLA? It does not look it has a duct to the top.

          In a non blower(AKA quiet) style, the GPU the heat is vented at both ends of card which looks to be eaten directly by the PS. Why would you have PS eating the very hot GPU exhaust?

          6.7 inches for mini-ITX, add a little for PCIe extension cable and what picture shows, that should allow a 170mm fan. Increase that to 7.5″ and you can easily add a 180mm fan.

          If they are going to enclose the case in such a manner,they should add a quarter inch or so of diameter and add noise dampening material…

          To me seems like its going to be an extra noisy solution because of poor heat management. Either PS vents onto MB or it sucks in really hot GPU/MB air and push out bottom which then just gets sucked right back in…

          I was not being flippant.

            • synthtel2
            • 4 years ago

            The real advantage of a cylindrical design is in convective cooling. With a big tower like that (especially if it’s unnecessarily tall), you can get fairly solid air movement without running the fan at all. It’s also ridiculously easy to flood the place with nice cool air, and without even making much noise (the lack of dead spots is real). That said, this case isn’t perfectly optimized for convection, and I think you’re right to be concerned about isolation between the two chambers. It might be fixable with a bit of duct tape though (I’ve had great luck solving airflow problems that way).

            I don’t give the A4 a free pass. It’s an excellent design in most ways, but the SSD isn’t isolated from the GPU at all. With vertical fin GPU coolers in particular, that SSD is going to get really really toasty. Again, it might be fixable with duct tape engineering, but it looks like it would take more work than usual.

            So long as we’re opining on such things, my own choice was an [url=https://www.ncases.com/<]NCase M1[/url<]. I'm beyond tired of random component failures, so I went workstation mode with it and made a special point of keeping all minor components cool. With an intake fan pointed right at the PSU and the SSD mounted adjacent, it does an excellent job at that. For the moment, doing that to perfection takes a bit much noise (case fan at ~1700 rpm to fully block hot air from my ~160W GPU from reaching the SSD), but I haven't yet bothered to get airflow shaping set up right (I only got the case Friday).

            • blahsaysblah
            • 4 years ago

            I went cheap with SilverStone Sugo SG13B for $40. I saw the M1, but it did not seem to make sense to me without custom water cooling for CPU and GPU. Have Noctua NH-L9i cpu cooler(90mm fan, fits entirely in CPU slot and very short) and one Noctua NF-14 140mm 3000rpm PWM for front fan sucking in.

            I got because i could use ATX PS, but than realized, the ATX PS butts within a few millimeters of back of video card and creates a heat bubble there(back of case not vented). Very disappointed for increased fan noise to keep low temps that i like. Oh, intake fan of PS was faced up for fresh air. Not down, sucking in MB/CPU air.

            Once i switched to SFX PS(also facing up for natural convection, fan doesnt turn on ever, Corsair SF450), the adapter plate(Silverstone PL08) added a tiny bit of vent holes. But also, the SFX itself added like 1/2″ on each side for air flow.

            Anyway, I’ve put, evenly spaced, six 2.5″ 7mm(2x ssd, 4x hdd) drives behind the front fan and everything is great. (Suspended with elastic band). Only possible after i built all my own custom power cables to save space. FYI, Coboc brand SATA data cables have pretty small tip for good safe bend radius versus the awesome Silverstone ones that are like $15 a pop.

            During idle/light web, (takes 5+ minutes for fans to actually come on after boot) CPU fan is 400-ish, front fan is 500-ish for really low temps. Around 32 CPU, 35C MB, depending on room temp. They don’t need to run full blast either, now that i switched to SFX PS due to better air flow.

            Not perfect, wish the back of case was vented under PS 🙂 But for $40 and such low fan speeds during normal usage…

            I think the fact that both CPU and Front Fan(based on MB temp) are set to 0% power at 30C to 100% power at 65C is testament to the good design of this case.

            Why i am so critical of these cases, like you.

            • synthtel2
            • 4 years ago

            Yeah, the M1 is definitely a high-end deal, and if you’re fine with an L9i, it would almost certainly be overkill (though it doesn’t take liquid cooling to be nice). It sounds like you’ve got a solid setup, especially for the price.

            I do really appreciate the availability of good SFX PSUs now (thanks Corsair!). The whole reason I didn’t upgrade to an M1 earlier was that it would have meant using a questionable PSU.

          • Nnyan
          • 4 years ago

          “Will probably cost half that…” That is a pure guess and wild speculation. You might as well guess that it’s going to cost $300.

        • kmm
        • 4 years ago

        It’s not better in the lower depth way. Or the price way, probably.

      • shaurz
      • 4 years ago

      I worked it out to be about 40cm (15.75 inches).

      • TheMonkeyKing
      • 4 years ago

      From the link:

      OLA Specifications
      Model Ola
      Dimension (LxWxH) 88 x 88 x 52,8 mm
      (NOTE: I think they meant 88 cm instead of mm so that makes it out to be about 35 inches x 35 inches x 21 inches, otherwise it is 4″ x 4″ x 2″)

      Weight 5 kg
      Motherboard Support Mini ITX
      3.5″ Drive Bays 1
      2.5″ Drive Bays 1 or 2
      System Fan XT140 (120 mm x 1)
      External Electronics Power On/Off, Audio, Mic, USB 3.0
      PSU Support SFX
      Maximum Compatibility
      CPU Cooler Height *72~82 mm
      VGA Length 280 mm
      PSU Length 130 mm

      *cooler top must be no larger than 92x92mm

    • Shinare
    • 4 years ago

    “wood veneer panels” just made my day. Ola. I want one. bad.

    • NTMBK
    • 4 years ago

    The Taku looks really nice, actually. Loving the wooden legs. Just needs an optical slot on the front.

      • tay
      • 4 years ago

      It needs an optical slot about as bad as a fish needs a bicycle.

        • DancinJack
        • 4 years ago

        accurate most the time

        for an HTPC though, an optical slot makes sense

      • Horshu
      • 4 years ago

      I’d just move the power button to the center, but otherwise I love the simplicity of it.

    • the
    • 4 years ago

    So a Mac Pro with real meaningful expansion?

    Apple are you listening?

      • derFunkenstein
      • 4 years ago

      By the time they get around to updating the Mac Pro again (hey, it’s only been THREE YEARS), we’ll probably all have our PCs embedded in sub-dermal implants.

      • DPete27
      • 4 years ago

      Amazing what you can do in 3 years while copying someone else’s initial idea.

        • Ninjitsu
        • 4 years ago

        *cough* computer mouse *cough*

      • DragonDaddyBear
      • 4 years ago

      I’m not an Apple fan by any stretch of the imagination, but, to be fair, Apple’s fits 2 GPUs. Then again, they use custom cooling and other custom parts.

      Anyways, the “Pro” is long overdue for an update.

        • the
        • 4 years ago

        That is the thing, they didn’t need to go proprietary. Instead of the mezzanine style GPU connect, they could have gone with a standard and used two MXM slots. Instead of the proprietary SSD slot, they could have used M.2. These two changes would have made the Mac Pro far more tolerable as there would have been at least a [i<]potential[/i<] upgrade path.

          • DragonDaddyBear
          • 4 years ago

          Yes, but then they wouldn’t sell as many Darth Vader v2 Mac Pros when they finally get around to releasing them.

          • ImSpartacus
          • 4 years ago

          I’m not sure if that’s even worth it. I’d imagine that apple’s custom form factors are smaller than the official options (as is the obsession in Cupertino).

          And would mxm really make that much of a difference? Even when the Mac pro used pcie cards, they were still implicitly limited to those built for mac os (which were rare and cost more). Mxm cards already are rare and cost more. I’m just not sure that it would be worth it.

          But for storage? Sure, it’d be nice, no argument there. But Apple makes their margins on storage and memory buy-ups, so they have limited incentive to play ball (especially if they can design a form factor smaller than m.2).

            • the
            • 4 years ago

            MXM cards are indeed rare on the open market, mainly due to most systems needing custom cooling. The 2013 Mac Pro wouldn’t have this problem since the cooling is a centralized part. Worst case would be the need for a shim to account for different GPU z-heights. Having a ‘main stream’ system using MXM would have at least spurred a few upgrades at more traditional Mac stores (OWC etc.). That would have reduced the volume criticism or stopped it if MXM upgrades weren’t difficult to get.

            Apple does make money on storage/memory when they sell a computer. However, they still have memory slots on the Mac Pro so going with M.2 storage here wouldn’t be that different.

            [quote<]Even when the Mac pro used pcie cards, they were still implicitly limited to those built for mac os [/quote<] That is demonstratively false. Right now my 2010 Mac Pro has a GTX 770 in it and for awhile it was sporting a GTX 970.

      • tipoo
      • 4 years ago

      That reminds me, the premise of the Mac Pro seemed to be that you’d be able to expand the GPUs through thunderbolt. However, since it’s on 2, it looks like its users are going to be bypassed in favor of Thunderbolt 3.

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