AOC set to release quantum-dot-flavored monitor

It seems quantum-dot monitors are starting to be a thing. We reported on Philips' 276E6ADSS a while back, and now AOC is looking to get in on the action with the stateside release of its first quantum-dot display.

AOC didn't mention the model name in its PR, but we believe this model to be the I2771F9, which was announced last year. The model name may not be fancy, but the display has some enticing specifications. The monitor measures 27" across its diagonal, and has a resolution of 1920×1080.

While the resolution may seem a little low, the color gamut should make up for it. AOC says the panel covers 98% of the Adobe RGB color space, with a delta-E of under three across the board. Unsurprisingly, AOC mentions photography work as a use case for the new model. Connectivity options include VGA, DVI, and HDMI ports.

AOC is using QD Vision's Color IQ technology, which purportedly offers "50% better color performance than a typical monitor." QD Vision says that its quantum-dot technology is superior to all competing solutions, while having a "much lower overall cost." AOC offered no pricing information for its display, but as a point of reference, the similarly-specced Philips 276E6ADSS is currently going for $270. The company says the monitor should be available immediately.

Comments closed
    • mcnabney
    • 4 years ago

    1080p and 27″ might only make sense for applications like ‘watching TV’. If color accuracy is the purpose of this display that resolution made all of the image and video people turn up their noses and keep their regular 10 bit 1440p+ displays.

      • LostCat
      • 4 years ago

      I’d prefer a 10 bit 1080p display, what with all the content I need to upscale already.

    • meerkt
    • 4 years ago

    “50% better color performance”!

    Are the colors 50% more real or more colorful? Or maybe a mix of both.

    Weasel words. Marketers just love ’em.

      • jts888
      • 4 years ago

      This is actually probably a pretty legit figure, since CIE chromaticity horseshoe diagrams are pretty much the only standard for color gamut.

      Since sRGB doesn’t even really cover half the full perceptible gamut, they couldn’t even really be playing games by saying they have 50% less uncovered areas than standard, etc.

      How much value super-saturated colors offer to the average consumer is up for debate, but this is not likely to be a complete B.S. marketing figure.

        • meerkt
        • 4 years ago

        But it doesn’t say +50% gamut, it says “performance”.

          • GrimDanfango
          • 4 years ago

          Clearly they’ve just increased the speed of light to 449,688,687m/s. Nothing suspect about that claim.

            • sonofsanta
            • 4 years ago

            I wonder what that does to input lag.

            • meerkt
            • 4 years ago

            Nothing. But the OUTPUT will be perceived 0.66ns earlier, if you’re sitting 60cm away.

    • jts888
    • 4 years ago

    QD backlighting (including wavelength converting filters in the screen) is pretty sexy, but cross-subpixel light leakage still limits gamut maximization somewhat.

    I’m still hoping that pure QD LED displays end up being viable, since they’d have nearly perfect contrast, gamut, and response time characteristics.

      • UberGerbil
      • 4 years ago

      [quote<] cross-subpixel light leakage still limits gamut maximization somewhat.[/quote<]Now there's a phrase that'll get you laid.

    • albundy
    • 4 years ago

    can i use my monitor radiation filter from my 13″ samtron CRT?

    • cegras
    • 4 years ago

    How did they sidestep ROHS?

    > Our Color IQ solution, using quantum dots based on cadmium selenide, creates a net reduction in the amount of elemental (or “free”) cadmium in the environment, while also delivering more energy efficiency than any other color gamut technology available today for LED solutions.

    They didn’t.

    • Neutronbeam
    • 4 years ago

    Quantum-dot? Does this mean the monitor is dual-state–it’s both on and off at the same time?

    Quantum stuff and time loops give me headaches…

      • FrankJR
      • 4 years ago

      I believe the way the dots produce light, does not work under classical physics, i.e. Maxwell equations and such, but does work according to quantum mechanics. Sort of like the tunnel diode.

        • Srsly_Bro
        • 4 years ago

        Good thing we have Pascal now..

        Sup?

        edit:

        Did someone miss it or just cranky and irritable?

      • sotti
      • 4 years ago

      It’s basically a fancy name for tiny particles that fluoresce.

      The size of the particle determines the wave length of light emitted when it fluoresces. So they use green and red quantum-dot particles on a film with blue LEDs to generate the spectrum for the backlight.

      After that it’s all bog standard LCD.

    • RoxasForTheWin
    • 4 years ago

    But does it come in Blue Raspberry?

      • morphine
      • 4 years ago

      Wide-Gamut Blue Raspberry. Get on with the times.

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