GOG Connect offers DRM-free downloads from your Steam library

As of yesterday, CD Projekt's subsidary GOG.com has a new feature called GOG Connect. GOG users can connect their site accounts to their Steam libraries and import titles owned on Valve's service to their GOG library. This gives them access to DRM-free downloads of the games that can be played forever without online verification. The new service doesn't require users to download the GOG Galaxy client, either—it can be managed completely from the website.

Not every title is supported, and in fact the list of games available for the service right now is pretty short, with about 20 titles. Still, some pretty popular games are present, such as FTL: Faster than LightSaints Row 2, and The Witcher: Enhanced Edition. GOG says there are more to come, too. The feature is here to stay, but games will come and go from the list of titles available to be imported as the company wheels and deals with developers and publishers. 

Valve's Steam service is a runaway success, and the PC gaming landscape would be a lot different without it. Not everyone is a fan, though. Steam's required online verification can be considered a form of DRM, a dirty word to some users. Games on GOG.com are DRM-free downloads, and the site goes to great lengths to ensure that even very old games will play flawlessly on modern systems. GOG's Galaxy client allows users to roll back game updates to older versions, too.

Comments closed
    • Klimax
    • 3 years ago

    That could be interesting. How many games they have out of my 1000+ Steam Library. (And all are installed on my primary PC…)

    • BobbinThreadbare
    • 3 years ago

    [quote<]Steam's required online verification can be considered a form of DRM, a dirty word to some users.[/quote<] While this is definitely a form of DRM, not all games require it. That makes Steam basically equal to GOG for those games (you have to login to download, then you're free to do what you please with the files). [quote<]Games on GOG.com are DRM-free downloads, and the site goes to great lengths to ensure that even very old games will play flawlessly on modern systems. [/quote<] Great lengths is a huge overstatement to be honest. There are a handful of games they've actually patched themselves, mostly they just set up Dosbox or SCUMMVM. In other cases, a modder fixed the game originally.

      • NovusBogus
      • 3 years ago

      [quote<]While this is definitely a form of DRM, not all games require it. That makes Steam basically equal to GOG for those games (you have to login to download, then you're free to do what you please with the files).[/quote<] True, but Steam itself does a poor job of explaining this. One of the reasons I went GOG-exclusive about two years ago is I no longer have to do a bunch of research to see whether something that sounds interesting is going to try to shaft me later, I just inherently know I'm safe and can focus on the shopping.

        • BobbinThreadbare
        • 3 years ago

        My post seems pretty negative, but I do like GOG quite a bit and own over a 100 games with them.

      • NoOne ButMe
      • 3 years ago

      No, GoG is far superior still with DRM.

      And even those simple tasks GoG does is worlds ahead of steam where games can launch and be possible to purchase but they don’t open, or are missing the .exe. Compatibility takes time and sometimes money beyond paying a tester.

      I’m torn, as I probably can get some games much cheaper on Steam and unlock DRM-free with GoG. But given Steam’s bad practices (they have improved thanks to refunds at least!) I think I would rather pay more and have GoG take money.

        • BobbinThreadbare
        • 3 years ago

        If you get a game with no exe you should demand a refund.

        Anyways, some lengths is not great lengths. Steam goes to no lengths, this is true, that doesn’t mean GOG goes to great lengths. Claiming they do gives them credit that dedicated modders or companies like Night Dive deserve.

      • DoomGuy64
      • 3 years ago

      [quote<]the site goes to great lengths to ensure that[/quote<] their installers didn't work under linux or 9x. Well, at least the linux part changed after the complaints. [quote<]In other cases, a modder fixed the game originally.[/quote<] IMHO, the best part of GOG is their community. Definitely what keeps it going, although GOG probably should give more credit and/or financial compensation to the modders they're profiting off of. I love GOG. However, I haven't been buying as many games there lately because of the lack of new classic titles, higher prices, and modern games muddying the waters. GOG connect might help bring people in though. I will say this: GOG isn't the only one fixing old games. They just made it mainstream. [url<]https://namethattech.wordpress.com/2016/01/18/fixing-up-old-computer-games/[/url<] Somebody finally fixed MissionForce: CyberStorm. w00t. Nostalgia wave incoming. Also: [url<]http://www.tribesuniverse.com/[/url<] and [url<]http://www.sierrahelp.com/Patches-Updates/NewSierraInstallers.html#ESXP[/url<]

    • Sargent Duck
    • 3 years ago

    Although I hate DRM as much as the next person, I have to say, I haven’t found Steam’s DRM to be bad at all.

    Not at all like Starforce which was impossible to remove after you un-installed the game or Ubisoft’s implementation in SplinterCell: Chaos Theory which prevents the game from running on Windows 7.

    Steam’s DRM has been…unobtrusive.

      • Ifalna
      • 3 years ago

      Until your internet goes poof and you try to run a game you haven’t run since you last reinstalled windows.

        • Sargent Duck
        • 3 years ago

        and #12

        I agree it’s not perfect. But compare Steam to Uplay, GFWL or Origin. Of the 4 DRM “platforms”, it is the “best”…

        And just to be clear, I’m not arguing FOR DRM, as I’ve run into some of the problems you guys have mentioned and been annoyed as hell, I’m just saying it’s “best of the worst”

          • NoOne ButMe
          • 3 years ago

          Yes. Steam DRM is among the best for not punishing customers. I still think unless it is online-MP only that DRM has no place. If you have a significant single-player game you should lack DRM. At least for the single player.

      • Redundant
      • 3 years ago

      I felt the same. My oldest son recently turned 6 and I bought him ARK because of his interest in Dinosaurs. I don’t play it at all. But, once he’s playing it I can no longer launch and play any other Steam game. I had no idea it even worked that way until this occurred. More than annoyed when I stare at my 130+ games and think that when my sons get old enough to play them–there will be this thorn in our sides. I had to turn around and buy a second copy of ARK for a new account I made for him.

      I never realized that no matter how big my library got, Steam was only ever going to allow me (and my family) to play one game at a time…

      GOG will get my future purchases.

        • cygnus1
        • 3 years ago

        Did you try the Steam Family sharing between your account and the child account? I thought that would let another user play your games as long as you’re not playing that game. Or is that also locking your entire library?

          • weaktoss
          • 3 years ago

          Steam’s family sharing doesn’t help in this scenario, as shared titles are only available if the owner account is not currently playing a game. If the owner account fires up any game at all, any account playing a shared game gets booted off in a couple of minutes. Might be able to work around it by having the owner account go into offline mode before they start whatever they’re trying to play, but that’s cumbersome.

            • Redundant
            • 3 years ago

            He was able to play it offline while I used a title in online mode. Otherwise, your description matches my experience. My issue is that to buy a game for my kids, I can’t really buy it for my library. Who really knows that? I sure didn’t. It’s just something you find out if your family grows. As far as Steam is concerned I am not buying the game as intended. Instead, I am buying an opportunity to play my present library of games OR the new title. :S

            • cygnus1
            • 3 years ago

            Seems like the only way around that would be to open a new account for every game you want to buy, and that seems super crappy. You could at least potentially sell the accounts somewhere or gift them to others.

            I honestly thought Valve had fixed this with the Family sharing, I just hadn’t had a chance to test it myself. Knowing it’s still this crappy is definitely disheartening.

        • slowriot
        • 3 years ago

        [quote<]GOG will get my future purchases.[/quote<] I guess? You can't buy Ark there. In fact, you can't buy pretty much any recently released major title outside of Witcher 3 there. No EA, no Blizzard, no Activision, no Ubisoft, and virtually none of the popular F2P titles... It's a very limited site if you are not seeking the titles where its namesake came from... Good Old Games. It sucks but its not uncommon. i.e. its not something Origin or Battle.net allows either.

          • NovusBogus
          • 3 years ago

          [quote<]I guess? You can't buy Ark there. In fact, you can't buy pretty much any recently released major title outside of Witcher 3 there. No EA, no Blizzard, no Activision, no Ubisoft, and virtually none of the popular F2P titles[/quote<] Their loss--there's plenty of games in the world, why lock myself into a few that want to play by their own rules? Incidentally, GOG is only weak on AAA shooters; just about everything else, in particular the glorious RPG revival, is available now and games are starting to dual-launch on GOG and Steam.

          • NoOne ButMe
          • 3 years ago

          And instead you can buy all those Blizzard games… on Steam?
          (+1)

            • BobbinThreadbare
            • 3 years ago

            You can’t buy new EA games on Steam either as a general rule.

            • slowriot
            • 3 years ago

            You can’t. Where did I claim you could? I was pointing out the extreme limitations of GOG and its marketplace and how every other market has basically the same limitations as Steam. Not that Steam was some kind of answer to all your problems.

        • DoomGuy64
        • 3 years ago

        File a bug report. Enough people complain, it’ll get fixed. I’m sure it’s not supposed to work like that.

          • BobbinThreadbare
          • 3 years ago

          No that’s exactly how it’s supposed to work. You aren’t supposed to have multiple people using one account.

            • DoomGuy64
            • 3 years ago

            Riiight. So family library sharing isn’t a thing? I can understand steam only allowing you to run a single instance of a game per user, but having a shared account disable all your other games has to be either a bug or the feature doesn’t work as advertised. File a complaint.

      • GrimDanfango
      • 3 years ago

      I have no great issue with Steam’s approach in general, but so long as I remember, I will always check on GOG first to see if a game is available on there, as ultimately no DRM is always going to be a more sound choice for the future, and well, just on idealogical principle.

      It does concern me that the more games I buy on Steam, the more games are locked into an account that only allows me to play a single game at any one time. That single issue is the only thing that truly angers me about Steam – I paid for the damn things individually… I can understand not being permitted to run the same game on two different machines at the same time, but why the hell can’t my family members play a game I purchased that I’m not currently playing?

    • BobbinThreadbare
    • 3 years ago

    Neato.

    • derFunkenstein
    • 3 years ago

    [quote<] games will come and go from the list[/quote<] whoa, hold on. So does that mean that as games "go" from the list, they'll disappear from my GOG library too? If so, then why would I bother, if I couldn't download it again later (say if my HDD dies or if I build a new system)?

      • rahulahl
      • 3 years ago

      No. It means if you don’t use the connect now to get these games you might not get the chance again. But once a game is in your library, its yours.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 3 years ago

        Alright, that’s not so bad. So you have to periodically check to see if you need to reimport your Steam library, and it won’t happen automatically?

          • cygnus1
          • 3 years ago

          Yep, per the GoG site:

          [quote<] You'll be able to permanently import all the games listed below to your GOG.com library – assuming you own them. [/quote<] I just linked my accounts and imported 8 games. It appears to process the addition as an order with a 100% discount code called GOGCONNECT. Got an order email confirming $75.92 worth of free games added to my GoG library.

        • NovusBogus
        • 3 years ago

        It’s a CYA in case a publisher pulls out, which has happened for them a few times. Nordic in particular has been on and off GOG itself several times, but you could still download already-bought Nordic games in the meantime.

    • slowriot
    • 3 years ago

    So… is the list of games simply also the ones on Steam with no DRM? Being on Steam does not mean a game automatically has DRM.

      • Yan
      • 3 years ago

      [url=http://steam.wikia.com/wiki/List_of_DRM-free_games<]Many[/url<] [url=http://pcgamingwiki.com/wiki/The_Big_List_of_DRM-Free_Games_on_Steam<]games[/url<] on Steam don't have DRM, many more than the 23 now listed on GOG. Edit: "about 20" doesn't mean "exactly 20".

        • RAGEPRO
        • 3 years ago

        That’s true. In fact, one of the titles in this promotion actually has Steam DRM on Steam (Saints Row 2).

          • cygnus1
          • 3 years ago

          I think this promotion/feature is going to be dependent on the Publishers. Any of them that publish identical titles on both services and don’t really value Steam DRM probably don’t care if GoG gives you a copy of the game also. GoG will just have to work with them to authorize the free cross-entitlement. I’m sure if GoG is paying anything as part of the promotion, they’re counting it as marketing dollars. Either that or GoG convinced the Publishers that this will drive sales and GoG doesn’t take as big of a cut as Valve maybe?

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This