First non-reference GeForce GTX 1070s appear

As we said last week, the GeForce GTX 1070 presents a tantalizing value proposition, but that Founders Edition premium puts a bit of a damper on things. Plenty of eager eyes are pointed toward the non-reference cards that Nvidia predicted would ring in at about $379 for the GeForce GTX 1070. Even though the reference GTX 1070 cards have yet to hit the market, some vendors have already started announcing boards with customized cooling setups.

We missed Gigabyte's GTX 1080 Xtreme Gaming in our non-reference 1080 roundup by a few hours, but the company is among the first to show a non-reference 1070 card, in the form of the the GTX 1070 G1 Gaming. According to Gigabyte, the ridged fan design on this card's Windforce 3X cooler should increase airflow by 23% over traditional fans. Configurable RGB LEDs and a metal backplate are included, as seems to be becoming the norm for high-end video cards.

MSI has some customized GTX 1070s on display, too. The GTX 1070 Gaming X wears the Twin Frozr IV cooler with updated fans and RGB LEDs, and requires an extra six-pin power connector alongside the reference model's eight-pin plug. MSI is also showing off the GTX 1070 Aero and Aero OC editions, which use a non-reference blower design and differ only in clock speeds. A Corsair-provided water-cooling setup chills the GPU of the GTX 1070 Sea Hawk, while a radial fan cools the memory and power delivery hardware.

TechPowerUp has some images from Computex of the EVGA GTX 1070 SC, with the same ACX 3.0 cooler we saw on the GTX 1080 SC last week. Finally, Hong-Kong-based manufacturer Inno3D is releasing two varieties of the GTX 1070, equipped with the same iChill x3 and x4 coolers we saw on the company's GTX 1080 offerings. Unfortunately, there's no telling when these non-reference video cards will be available. Given that as of this writing online merchants can't even keep the Founders Edition GTX 1080 in stock, it may be a while. Hopefully the answer is sooner rather than later.

Comments closed
    • Chrispy_
    • 3 years ago

    I’d love to see more third-party coolers that vent to the outside.

    I’ve never seen a good blower outside of the Nvidia reference blowers – There seems to be this illogical preconception among OEMs that blowers should be cheap. Why though?

    People looking for blowers are likely to have paid one or more premiums over the mass market – either they’ve sacrificed a lot and paid over the odds for an ITX setup in an SFF case, or they’re HTPC users who need low noise and no building of heat internally. Then there are those who buy the more expensive cases with soundproofing, indirect airflow and high end fans in their case and CPU cooler.

    Those customers aren’t cheap customers; those are the customers with money who have already showed proof that they’re willing to pay a premium price for what they want; Why do OEMs insist of providing cheap plastic shrouds, low-quality fin arrays and throaty, rough-sounding squirrel-cage fans? People looking for a cheap card will take the open-air cooler on sale EVERY TIME, so what’s the point of low-quality blowers at all?

      • Voldenuit
      • 3 years ago

      Even nvidia’s uber expensive FU editions with their blower fans are outperformed by open air coolers, so they really target a very specific set of users with poor airflow in the first place. Doesn’t seem like a big market to chase, when customers will see that a windforce, directcu or twin frozr card will outperform a blower, and usually with lower noise (albeit most review sites test on setups with good airflow to begin with). There’s certainly a niche for blowers, but it’s a niche.

        • Chrispy_
        • 3 years ago

        I’m not denying that it’s a niche.

        I’m just confused why OEMs see this niche, and then offer exactly what the niche [i<]doesn't[/i<] want. It's not even going to be a niche for long. The full ATX tower is losing ground to SFF and compact PCs quite rapidly, given how long it has ruled supreme. Five years ago an mITX box was a niche, now there's a huge market for them and every case manufacturer fighting it out in the market offers several variants with regular redesigns and updates.

          • Voldenuit
          • 3 years ago

          It would be interesting to see someone do a thorough review of mini and micro cases with open-air and blower style coolers. My personal prediction is that the gamer-oriented mITX cases already have sufficient airflow not to need a blower to aid exhaust/avoid hot air contamination.

          It’s not uncommon to see mITX cases with separate GPU compartments connected by a ribbon these days (Silverstone RVZ/Milo series, Corsair Bulldog, etc). Those cases wouldn’t contaminate the main CPU area with GPU exhaust, but they might also suffer from a lack of GPU exhaust ducting, so I’d be curious to see which way the cards fall.

          I went mATX with a big open air (windforce triple fan cooler). I think my case’s airflow is not up to the task (built system around a Silverstone PS-09 for cheap a couple years ago), so I’m upgrading the case to a Phanteks Enthoo Evolv mATX. Interested to find out how much, if any, improvement I’ll see.

      • bfar
      • 3 years ago

      A misconception about AIB coolers is that they’re always better than the reference blowers. Some AIBs cheap out seriously, especially in the to low end stuff.

      I say Nvidia has cottoned on to it

    • CScottG
    • 3 years ago

    *want*

    -but sadly I’ll wait until around Cyber-Monday in hopes that the price will have dropped 20% or more for a quick deal.

    Sucks to be an early-adopter.. BUT

    -*really* sucks to be a cheap-ass.

    • Forge
    • 3 years ago

    I’m still happy for now on my GTX 970, but I only have one DP out and I have two Dell 4K panels which need DP input. Jumping across to a 1080 will get me that second DP out I need, and one with a Corsair watercooler on the core sounds fun.

    Bring it on, MSI. 1080 Sea Hawk for me.

    • Kretschmer
    • 3 years ago

    This is really cool tech, and I’m tempted to eBay my 290X and MG279Q to hop over to the land of “just works”. Freesync has been very hit-or-miss for me; hopefully a fresh reinstall of Win10 this weekend will cure the driver woes.

    Edit to answer questions:

    I run a two-monitor setup off of a 290X: a Freesync MG279Q over displayport and a non-Freesync Dell IPS over DVI.

    For the first several months of ownership, I couldn’t get Freesync working at all. The breakthrough came when I disconnected the DVI display for bit, ran my games, and reconnected it: several games started working with adaptive sync. It’s quite nice, especially when a game’s frame rates dip. If at all possible, I’d suggest a monitor with a low minimum rate.

    Currently, Freesync has been a mixed bag for me, with or without the second display. Guild Wars 2 plays nicely with the tech, while Doom and Overwatch won’t cooperate at all. In Overwatch my MG279Q runs at max refresh rate (144Hz) with two displays connected, and oddly locks at 59Hz with just the Freesync display (even though my overwatch FPS is typically ~90).

    After running Nvidia since 2008 (8800GT/460Ti/660Ti), the AMD drivers have been a frustrating impediment to the excellent value proposition of my 290X. I experience artifacts from time to time (usually appearing in older titles after driver updates), game stability is high but no longer 100%, and FreeSync is so spotty that I’ve given up on it in certain games.

    Now my experience may not be prevalent outside of my particular hardware setup, but I’m seriously considering eBaying my current GPU/monitors and trying over with a 1070 and GSync 27″. My time (and access to working features) is worth $250-$300. The next step is a reformat and reinstall this weekend (planned anyways for Win10 and a new 1TB SSD); hopefully that will mitigate my current issues.

      • ImSpartacus
      • 3 years ago

      It’s helpful to hear feedback on variable refresh implementations.

      I had been sitting out until the market consolidated on one of the two techs (or consistently/cheaply adopts both like sli & cf). However, it’s useful to hear that there might be additional reasons to stay on the bench for a little longer.

        • ColeLT1
        • 3 years ago

        I built a computer, for a friend, with a XB270HU (27″ GSYNC IPS 1440p) and it was like HD vs SSD comparison to me, but the $800 price kept me away.

        I got a $370 XB270H (27″ GSYNC TN 1080p) and dropping pixel density from 1200p 24″ was too much. Sold it 3 days later when a Dell S2716DG (27″ GSYNC TN 1440p) came on the shell shocker for $470ish.

        Very happy with my current setup.

        Not happy with the closed standards us vs them state of the refresh sync world though.

        Edit: My only complaint (besides gsync fpga price) is the 144hrz desktop nvidia driver bug. I think the bug is only with dual monitors or more. My video card will not down-clock at idle and run about 10c warmer. The fix is to set your refresh rate in windows to 120, and then set the games (as you should anyway), to have vsync-off/gsync-on and you will get 144hrz if the engine allows. When I got the monitor the bug was fixed, then re-introduced, so there must be some other undying issue with 144hrz on the windows desktop.

      • Voldenuit
      • 3 years ago

      [quote<]Freesync has been very hit-or-miss for me[/quote<] Can you tell us more? I'm finally jumping onto the G-sync wagon after a couple years of 'not getting one until nvidia supports open standards', but found an ROG Swift for an irresistable price. I was under the impression that G-Sync 'just works', didn't realize there were compatibility issues (other than silly Bethsoft games like Skyrim tying physics to FPS).

      • ronch
      • 3 years ago

      Seems to me, many times AMD puts out products or features that still have rough edges. Happened with Turbo Core (the implementation of Turbo Core in the Phenom II X6 was a joke), Cool n Quiet (it’s no secret that it has some history of hurting performance), driver issues (including numerous installation issues I’ve had), AHCI issues, USB 3.0 issues, thermal sensor issues (most thermal sensor apps couldn’t seem to read my FX’s sensors properly even as they claim support for it), Hybrid Graphics issues with my Lenovo laptop that has an AMD GPU, etc. Like, if you’re buying an AMD product there’s usually something that still needs work. Something that needs an excuse or feels half baked. I didn’t feel that when I had Intel or NvIdia. Their stuff usually seem more polished and professionally designed.

      Still, i have an affinity for AMD. Their products work OK, for the most part.

        • srg86
        • 3 years ago

        For years when I used to always buy AMD, it was usually because the chips performed better, or just rooting for the underdog. I do remember having this same feeling right the way from K6-2 to Athlon Barton. My Athlon64 system seemed more solid.

        For me it was mainly AMD memory controllers that have given me trouble.

        Even back during those days, I remember thinking that Intel stuff was more polished but I put up with it.

        Now I’m I have mostely Intel setups and I don’t want to go back to that. An AMD chip would have to be easily faster than anything Intel makes (higher end consumer price range) for me to go back to them again. Their use of ASMedia in the future does not help me want to use their products again.

          • ronch
          • 3 years ago

          The K7 was an exception. It was also the first time AMD grabbed the performance crown from Intel with no excuse.

          The Athlon 64 was great too, but it seems like it was more of a fluke at a time when Intel went with a bad architecture and miscalculated IA-64’s (Itanium) market acceptance. AMD saw a gaping hole in Intel’s strategy and took advantage. K8 wasn’t really all it’s made up to be though. I believe the original K8 (the one Jim Keller really worked on) was cancelled so Fred Webber and Co. took the K7 and quickly hacked together what would become the commercially available K8. I think it’s crazy how everyone is lead to believe Jim Keller was the man behind K8. Well, yes and no, but more like no.

        • Kretschmer
        • 3 years ago

        I have nothing against AMD (snarky TR posts are generally a reaction to annoying overenthusiasm for the vendor). At this point in my life, I’m willing to spend a few more bucks to compute without a headache. If I get a handful of hours in a week to play a new title, I’d prefer not to spend a few of them troubleshooting my hardware setup.

        AMD the company I often appreciate (Freesync as a consumer-friendly alternative, championing OpenGL, etc.), but that only will translate into purchases when the tech is sufficiently polished.

        I get the feeling that the RTG is spread too thin by a parent company that is bleeding money on x86/APUs, and I’d love to see what they could do in hardware and software with a laser focus on desktop graphics.

      • Spunjji
      • 3 years ago

      “Just works” isn’t entirely representative of GSYNC and NVIDIA drivers in my experience. I have had a few problems, from the drivers weirdly turning GSYNC off by themselves (especially when upgrading to newer driver versions) to an odd total GPU driver crash that turned out to have been caused by my mobile phone being too close to the monitor.

      I haven’t used Freesync yet, though, so I honestly don’t know how it compares.

        • Voldenuit
        • 3 years ago

        Expecting delivery of an ASUS ROG Swift PG278Q (1440p, 144Hz, G-Sync, TN) sometime this weekend, fingers crossed. Yeah, the PG279Q (IPS) is lust-worthy, but it’s also [i<]eight hunnert dorra[/i<]. Waay too many dorra.

          • Kretschmer
          • 3 years ago

          The Acer XB270HU is down to $700 on Newegg with the same panel, which still isn’t great.

        • tsk
        • 3 years ago

        I have excellent freesync experience with my Acer XG270HU 1440p 144Hz. I set framerate target control to 144fps and have the best gaming experience I’ve had with a display so far.

      • mkk
      • 3 years ago

      Make sure that the games run in true fullscreen and not borderless windowed for instance. I don’t have those particular games but my own MG279Q has just worked, even with the freesync range tweak that brings the span up to 60-144 hz.

      Except that with 144 hz at 1440p I realized that my R9-290 doesn’t quite cut it anymore. 😉

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This