GeForce GTX 1070 launch availability check: slim pickings

Today's the day that the GeForce GTX 1070 Founders Edition becomes available for purchase. The long-awaited transition off of 28-nm lithography started, of course, with the GTX 1080, but that high-end product has a high-end price tag to match. In traditional fashion, the GTX 1070 offers most of the performance of its sibling for a lot less money.

At least, that's the theory. In practice, much like the GTX 1080 launch before it, GTX 1070 cards are in short supply right now. Newegg doesn't even have listings for GTX 1070s yet. B&H Photo Video does have GTX 1070 cards listed, but no stock at the time of this writing. There was briefly a listing on Amazon being hawked at a significant premium over the $449 suggested retail price, but that stock evaporated as we wrote this article.

Meanwhile, Best Buy has the cards available, but only as part of complete system packages. EVGA might have product to sell, but the company's web store is currently on fire from what we imagine is a swarm of Pascal-crazed gamers unleashing their pent-up demand. Even Nvidia's own store is sold out of the cards already. Of course, eBay sellers have GTX 1070s available, as long as you don't mind a $150 markup. It's still early in the day, and hopefully the availability situation will improve soon. Let us know in the comments if you find a cache of these cards for sale.

Update: Newegg dropped us a line to let us know that cards from Asus, EVGA, Gigabyte, MSI, PNY, and Zotac are up on the site now.

Comments closed
    • jokinin
    • 3 years ago

    In Europe you can find it online, but prices start from 500 € ( ~ 560$ VAT included).

    • NoOne ButMe
    • 3 years ago

    I am sticking by my original guess of volume not catching up until early September.

    [url<]https://techreport.com/news/30028/rumor-nvidia-pascal-gp104-die-shots-leak[/url<]

    • Klimax
    • 3 years ago

    Looks like at least some shops got access to Palit’s 1070 here. (Czech Republic)

    • Krogoth
    • 3 years ago

    It looks like the 1070 is another HD 5850.

      • jts888
      • 3 years ago

      I see your point, but remember that 5870/5850 retailed for roughly $400/$250 at launch, not $650-$750/$400-$500 like the 1080/1070.

        • Krogoth
        • 3 years ago

        The prices for 5850 and 5870 quickly escalated due to demand until the units became unobtainium for almost a year.

        Scalpers were throwing their 5870s and 5850 onto ebay for ~$599 and ~$399.

          • mesyn191
          • 3 years ago

          That is a completely different situation. Don’t be a goal post shifter.

            • Krogoth
            • 3 years ago

            No, it is the same bloody situation.

            You have a highly-sought piece of hardware that has supply issues. The sheer demand is causing prices to go through the roof and scalpers are taking advantage of the situation.

            • mesyn191
            • 3 years ago

            The cause of the high prices and supply issues are different which makes the situation different.

            The 1080/70 are high priced to begin with. The 5870/50 were priced pretty fairly and then prices went up due to demand in spite of gradually increased supply.

            The 1080/70 are low volume parts right now due to manufacturing issues which is the root of all the supply issues right now. The 5870/50 had decent volume but sold at higher prices due to the demand.

            AMD said they had 10’s of thousands of 5870/50’s during the initial few months of the launch. I don’t know what the numbers are on the 1080/70’s but vendors have said the volume is very low.

            • travbrad
            • 3 years ago

            [quote<]The 1080/70 are high priced to begin with. The 5870/50 were priced pretty fairly and then prices went up due to demand in spite of gradually increased supply.[/quote<] Who is judging what is "fair" though? If 1080 and 1070 were actually selling at their MSRPs (especially the non-FE MSRP) they would offer a big increase in the amount of performance per dollar compared to the previous generation stuff. I agree they aren't a good value with the current marked up prices though. It's hard to judge how much of it is caused by low supply or high demand. I would imagine there is more pent up demand for this generation of cards than almost any previous generation. So many people have been in "waiting for non-28nm" mode for years now.

            • mesyn191
            • 3 years ago

            5870/50 were priced at $380 and $260 respectively and were some of the fastest cards at their launch. It wasn’t unusual for them to bench 35-40%+ faster, depending on the game, than the parts they were replacing (4890/70/50) in the high end from AMD.

            Vendors have already said that supply on the 1080/70 is low, no judging needed. Yes “pent up demand” is a factor but the pricing is clearly prohibitive once you start getting much over $300 even in the gaming market which is incredibly niche.

            • BurntMyBacon
            • 3 years ago

            [quote<]Who is judging what is "fair" though?[/quote<] People who were buying. Demand was high enough that even after the price hike they couldn't keep up with demand. [quote<]If 1080 and 1070 were actually selling at their MSRPs (especially the non-FE MSRP) they would offer a big increase in the amount of performance per dollar compared to the previous generation stuff.[/quote<] This is always true of a new generation. If we kept a constant price performance ration then we'd all be spending tens of thousands of dollars or more for cards by now. I think we can expect that as process improves and die sizes remain relatively constant prices should stay relatively stable as well.

          • jts888
          • 3 years ago

          If we’re going by ebay prices, the 1080 is in solid $800+ territory right now.

          My initial point was that the HD 58×0 series was in an essentially qualitatively different price bracket.

          Not being able to produce enough $250 cards over a longer span of time is an indication of either massive manufacturing problems (not the case here) or an unanticipated sales phenomenon.
          Not being able to produce enough $450+ cards on release is a sign of a semi-paper launch.

            • NoOne ButMe
            • 3 years ago

            Yes but the point is that both have ultra-low volume and were “launched”. This is true in both cases. AMD might have had 5x as many 5850 as Nvidia 1070, but demand was maybe 6x so it doesn’t matter.

      • NoOne ButMe
      • 3 years ago

      Yeah, TSMC’s lack of wafers for Nvidia/AMS both is the cause 🙁

    • jts888
    • 3 years ago

    How do the launch street prices of the 1070 (nominally $380) compare to what the 970 ($330) was two years ago?

    Was there $60-$70 markup then too, or is this more a direct result of Nvidia’s FE/suggested non-FE MSRPs?

      • chuckula
      • 3 years ago

      According to TR’s way-back-machine, the GTX-970 was generally available on launch day at roughly the MSRP: [url<]https://techreport.com/news/27079/geforce-gtx-970-980-cards-already-widely-available[/url<] However, some commentors in the thread claimed it was a paper launch: [url<]https://techreport.com/news/27079/geforce-gtx-970-980-cards-already-widely-available?post=852203[/url<] Senior Krogoth also noted that demand was driving prices higher than MSRP: [url<]https://techreport.com/news/27079/geforce-gtx-970-980-cards-already-widely-available?post=850268[/url<]

    • chuckula
    • 3 years ago

    A bunch just popped up on Newegg:

    [url<]http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814487247[/url<] [url<]http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814127941[/url<] [url<]http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814133630[/url<] And here's an FE GTX-1080 too: [url<]http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814127940[/url<]

    • NoOne ButMe
    • 3 years ago

    [url<]http://www.nowinstock.net/computers/videocards/nvidia/gtx1070/full_history.php[/url<] Well. They are keeping in stock around 2-3x the 1080 at launch.

    • Bensam123
    • 3 years ago

    So these were supposed to launch at $430, they’re currently at $450 on Newegg. They also don’t have a category btw. You have to manually search for them.

      • NoOne ButMe
      • 3 years ago

      No, $450 was the FE pricing.

        • Bensam123
        • 3 years ago

        Woops, it was 450.

    • Plazmodeus
    • 3 years ago

    Here in Canada NCIX has two 1070’s in stock, an EVGA and a Gigabyte board, they are $590 and $610 CAD. The 1080 boards are all around $900.

    I really want to pull the trigger on one of these, but I’ll wait until pricing comes down to something reasonable.

    • Leader952
    • 3 years ago

    and where exactly is TR’s review of the GTX 1070 and the earlier released GTX 1080?

      • DPete27
      • 3 years ago

      [url=https://techreport.com/discussion/30204/intel-boosts-the-high-end-desktop-with-its-broadwell-e-cpus?post=983361#983361<]Seriously bro?[/url<]

        • BurntMyBacon
        • 3 years ago

        No. That’s Leader952. Srsly_Bro is the one commenting on how the 1070 represents a lesser value than previous generations of x70 cards did in their time. Definitely two different people.

        Wait, what?

        You weren’t talk him?

        I should click the link.

        Oh.

      • Jeff Kampman
      • 3 years ago

      Believe it or not, we’re making good progress on our GTX 1080 review! Hope we can share it with you soon.

        • Leader952
        • 3 years ago

        Like when 2017?

          • Krogoth
          • 3 years ago

          Cool trolling story bro.

            • Leader952
            • 3 years ago

            Nothing but Brown Noser’s and excuse makers here.

            • Krogoth
            • 3 years ago

            Management already provided a detailed explanation for the delays.

            You are just trying to be a try-hard troll.

          • PrincipalSkinner
          • 3 years ago

          Read Jeff’s comment which is top rated at time of this writing. Or find another website.

      • UberGerbil
      • 3 years ago

      What difference does it make if you can’t buy one anyway?

      Edit: also: [url=https://techreport.com/discussion/30204/intel-boosts-the-high-end-desktop-with-its-broadwell-e-cpus?post=983361#983361<]That question has already been answered[/url<]

    • DPete27
    • 3 years ago

    Speaking of unavailability. Wasn’t Nvidia going to make an ASIC G-Sync chip so the price of G-Sync monitors would be significantly reduced? If you’re not going to support VESA, at least throw your cronies a bone.

      • MathMan
      • 3 years ago

      What a strange comment. It’s not as if Gsync monitors are in short supply.

        • xeridea
        • 3 years ago

        Short supply causes high prices, and Ebay availability at higher prices. Ebay markup for this is $150, the extra cost of GSync monitors is about $100 due to the FPGA used in them. This is the connection.

    • Srsly_Bro
    • 3 years ago

    75% of a 1080 isn’t most and certainly a worse deal than previous generations.

      • DPete27
      • 3 years ago

      Then go buy yourself a similarly performing GTX980Ti for $550. Yeah, that’s what I thought.

        • evilpaul
        • 3 years ago

        I paid $300 for an open box MSI 970. If the 980Ti was $450 I’d have grabbed that in a heartbeat.

      • Froz
      • 3 years ago

      75% is literally most.

        • southrncomfortjm
        • 3 years ago

        This is a true statement.

        • Srsly_Bro
        • 3 years ago

        Yes, but it needs to be noted that the gap between x70 and x80 iterations has widened in this generation. If I got a 75% on an exam, I wouldn’t brag to my classmates that I got *most* questions correct.

          • K-L-Waster
          • 3 years ago

          [quote<]If I got a 75% on an exam, I wouldn't brag to my classmates that I got *most* questions correct.[/quote<] Getting 3x more right than wrong isn't "most"? </pedantic>

            • Srsly_Bro
            • 3 years ago

            Yes, yes, maybe I’m just salty. I need an Auxy shrug to express myself.

            • JustAnEngineer
            • 3 years ago

            If the test had thirteen questions, you might get six right, get two wrong and leave five of them blank. That would give you a plurality, but not a majority.

            • derFunkenstein
            • 3 years ago

            Those five blank count as wrong on pretty much everything except the ACT, so in your scenario the test taker got seven wrong.

          • Chrispy_
          • 3 years ago

          Ignoring the literal meaning of most (51% of something is [i<]most[/i<]) I can still rationalise your logic: Getting 50% on an exam is a fail* not 0% so the scale is (misleadingly) 50-100, not 0-100 and 75% represents a middle-of-the-road score that you wouldn't brag about. 75% of the 50-100 range gets you a score of 88% which is probably brag-worthy. [i<]* - the actual pass mark varies by qualification but it's 50% for most** exams. ** - [b<]literally[/b<]***most, in this case. *** - LOLOLOL**** **** - Most***** people would stop editing now. ***** - but not all[/i<]

        • jts888
        • 3 years ago

        Let me play devil’s advocate here…

        If you look at “performance” as the incremental improvement over previous generations rather than the raw scores themselves, the criticism makes a fair amount of sense.

        Is the 1070’s performance more or less than the mean of say the 970 and the 1080?
        If not, it’s easier to claim that it’s not “mostly” like a 1080.

        In truth, most people would not consider something like the 960 to have “most” of the 980’s performance despite barely squeaking by with generally a little over 50% of the raw scores.

          • NoOne ButMe
          • 3 years ago

          The 1080 provides about 22% higher performance than the 1070 as per [url<]https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/10mwNtNsQXNJCjHQPtE5K636f-rXjZTRrmHszOUWyI6Y/edit#gid=0[/url<] 970 is about equal to 980ti, which is 40-50% over 970.

            • jts888
            • 3 years ago

            You meant the 1070 is about equal to the 980 Ti I think?

            In any case, the point remains that you can bias perceptions by setting arbitrary baselines for comparison.

            Is the 1070 more like the 1080 than it is like the 950 or worse? Yes, undeniably.
            Is the 1070 more like the 1080 than it is like the 970? Yes, but not by very much.
            Is the 1070 more like the 1080 than it is like the 980 Ti? No, almost not at all.

            People coming from the 980 or better are less likely to agree that the 1070 gives them “most” of the 1080’s performance, since it wouldn’t be true from a subjective comparative basis.

            • NoOne ButMe
            • 3 years ago

            having it be 50% faster than a 970 and 22% slower than a 1080 “yes, but not by very much” seems a false statement. The gap between the 970/1070 is over 2x what the gap between the 1070/1080.

      • Shoki
      • 3 years ago

      Is a 1070 the way to go for 1440p? Or should I get a 1080 for future proofing?

        • Krogoth
        • 3 years ago

        1070 will work under 1440p in the near-future but you may need to make trade-offs if you want AA/AF on top of that while retaining a smooth framerate.

        • rahulahl
        • 3 years ago

        1080 for future proofing.
        Depends a lot on your monitor as well. 60FPS is gonna be fine for a while.
        144 Hz and above.. definitely want a 1080.

    • mesyn191
    • 3 years ago

    Really seems to me like both the 1080 and 1070 have been glorified paper launches that NV did for mindshare.

    The high price of the 1080 and price gouging on the 1070 is making their value proposition questionable as a upgrade if you’ve already got a high-ish end card too.

    I’m sure supply will pick up eventually…right around when AMD launches the RX480 that is. I really doubt it was a coincidence that AMD chose to launch a month later.

      • southrncomfortjm
      • 3 years ago

      How are they gouges? They apparently far out perform the cards in their (and over their) price range. Seems like a good deal to me for real performance gains.

        • TardOnPC
        • 3 years ago

        There are some sellers that are price gouging, check Ebay and Amazon, well above MSRP. Fact is launch MSRP has gone up ~$50 for 980 successor and ~$80 for 970 successor. Not really a good deal paying more for replacements.

        • mesyn191
        • 3 years ago

        Price gouging is when sellers price the cards significantly over MSRP.

        And yes they’re fast but they’re also pretty expensive all things considered. Don’t fool yourself into thinking you’re getting great bang for your buck here.

          • southrncomfortjm
          • 3 years ago

          I’m not. I’m waiting for Black Friday to get mine.

      • chuckula
      • 3 years ago

      While both cards are certainly in tight supply, this wasn’t a paper launch. There are cards popping up for purchase and there are plenty of people who have been able to purchase the cards. The high launch-day prices are worthy of complaints but the non-FE cards with better prices are now starting to show up too.

      Additionally, just because NVidia had supply issues at launch doesn’t mean that AMD [i<]won't[/i<] have supply issues at launch.

        • mesyn191
        • 3 years ago

        Low volume + usually out of stock= paper launch.

        FWIW I’d call the R9 Fury cards paper launches too.

        Nvidia’s supply issues are due to a combo of GDDR5X supply crunch and the 1080/1070’s large die sizes.

        AMD’s Polaris 10 will have a much smaller die (so better yields) and is reportedly using GDDR5 so its a stretch to believe that AMD will have the same low part volume issues that Nvidia is having now.

        • NoOne ButMe
        • 3 years ago

        When did in tight supply mean 3 weeks after a launch the card is near impossible to buy at MSPR and according to the UK Overclockers site it is low volume arriving.

        and AMD has nothing to do with this.. They’ve had their share of paper launches over the years. So has Intel. I donMt recall seeing a product pushed forward to a rushed presentation and a delayed launch from that which suffered from low supply for nearing a month without thinking “paper launch”.

      • SetiroN
      • 3 years ago

      OR they’re being extremely smart and making everyone along the chain profit, as they just introduced the highest performing cards on top of their already highest performing cards.
      Lack of competition sucks.

    • Kretschmer
    • 3 years ago

    I’ll never understand these frenzies. Do you really need a GPU upgrade badly enough RIGHT NOW to pay well over MSRP on eBay?? Better SKUs and prices will be there for the taking in a few months.

      • chuckula
      • 3 years ago

      There is a fair bit of pent up demand.

      I pre-ordered my non-FE GTX-1080 (should be shipping next week) at $650, which is not an artificially marked up price. So a little waiting can go a long way.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 3 years ago

      Everyone wants to be the SSK of their friends. They have a thirst for shouting “FRIST!”

        • Milo Burke
        • 3 years ago

        I WANT TO BE THE SSK OF MY FRIENDS!

      • xeridea
      • 3 years ago

      This is typical for new high end cards. Being stuck on 28NM for 5 years has many excited for the first big upgrade in ages. Still, the people paying high prices are probably well off, so they don’t care about prices much.

        • Froz
        • 3 years ago

        I can understand it for 1080, because it simply is the best what you can get right now and there are always some people who pay anything for that. But for 1070?

      • iBend
      • 3 years ago

      yeah right.. just wait a few months and you’ll get overclocked version plus better cooling system from some manufaturer at cheaper price than that ebay price (right now)

      and maybe they will cut the MSRP because of amd polaris (and vega?)

      • sparkman
      • 3 years ago

      Time > Money, if you are rich enough.

      Me, I’ll wait a week or two before ordering my GTX 1080.

      But, my Rift arrived last night and soon I will hook it up to my GTX 770 to see what happens. Then we will see how long I can tolerate the performance before I crack and upgrade.

      • Takeshi7
      • 3 years ago

      I don’t get why people are rushing to get them either. The only times I ever feel compelled to upgrade is when a game comes out that basically requires a new generation of cards. Like when Half-Life 2/Doom 3 were released, and later, Crysis.

        • NoOne ButMe
        • 3 years ago

        But, but, consumerism!

      • SetiroN
      • 3 years ago

      People might be putting those up for sale, but it remains to be seen whether they’re actually selling any.

    • EzioAs
    • 3 years ago

    About 3 years ago, I think, AMD’s R9 290/290X was also scarce after release and had a crazy markup but that was due to demands for GPU-based virtual currency mining at the time. I wonder what are the reasons for the scarce availability this time.

      • mesyn191
      • 3 years ago

      New process is still going through yield issues + in high demand (cellphone ASIC’s + AMD).

      • xeridea
      • 3 years ago

      Out of stock cards was entirely due to Crypto-Currency. It became really lucrative, tens of thousands jumped on the bandwagon. Unfortunately by the time they did this, price and mining difficulty was pretty high, and a few months later China started putting up stiff regulations, causing a crash. I luckily started before the bubble, and got some 7950s at good prices.

      The cause of the mass popularity is because BitCoins went from $5 to $1200 in about a years time. After the crash they were about $300, and now back around $500. How the mining works, the more miners, the higher the difficulty (it auto adjusts every 2 weeks). So difficulty correlates with price, which is driven by speculation.

      The reason AMD cards were in short supply is because they were about 2x as fast as Nvidia cards, due to supporting some key operations that sped up the hashing algorithms.

      • SetiroN
      • 3 years ago

      You do understand this is the first 14nm product after FOUR years at 28nm and that it’s a jump of two litography nodes, not just one, right?

        • NoOne ButMe
        • 3 years ago

        It isn’t jumping 2 full nodes. 1.5ish nodes + FinFETs

    • ForceEdge
    • 3 years ago

    [url<]https://www.overclockers.co.uk/blog/detail/sCategory/110851/blogArticle/102[/url<] hahahahaha 365gbp for the basement model, 400 for the suckers' edition, and then 470 for a g1 gaming/480 for a strix.. needless to say, going amd! which just fits perfectly with my tradition of alternating between the two 🙂

      • Billstevens
      • 3 years ago

      If you are willing to spend $650 dollars to get a 1070 on ebay, you are far better off Justin suckling it up and buying a 1080… why sac performance if you have that kinda cash to blow… and the 1080 FE is easier to get.

    • nanoflower
    • 3 years ago

    I saw a couple of tweets from EVGA that they had the 1070s in stock and then a little later that they were sold out and people would need to check back in a few days to see if they had more for sale. Apparently Nvidia is having the sort of production issues that one might expect with a large die on a relatively new process so the 1080s/1070s are in short supply for now since both are based off the same die. I wonder how long this situation will last?

      • mesyn191
      • 3 years ago

      3-6months is typical for yields to improve enough to make a difference for a new process.

      That doesn’t mean there still won’t be improvements later on though. TSMC’s 28nm process went through A LOT of tweaks and improvements which helped extend its practical life while also improving yields.

      • southrncomfortjm
      • 3 years ago

      It’s either production issues or crazy high demand, or both. I’m going with both. It’s been what, 18 months or more since the 970 came out? People are desperate for big performance gains, so I’d guess there’s crazy demand, not just low supply.

        • K-L-Waster
        • 3 years ago

        This.

        Alot of “I’m waiting until something better than 28nm” people jumping on the latest thing.

        If it was me, I would wait a bit longer, at least until we see Pascal and Polaris go head to head and the supply of cards becomes more steady. That way you can be sure you’re getting the card you actually want and are not paying a just-after-release markup.

          • mesyn191
          • 3 years ago

          If you’re gonna wait then wait for Vega at least.

          That is supposed to be AMD’s new top end part. If the rumors are right its been pulled forward to late this year in Oct.

          • SetiroN
          • 3 years ago

          Thing is, Pascal and Polaris won’t go head to head, unless you’re counting two crossfire Polaris as a means of comparison as AMD does.

    • deruberhanyok
    • 3 years ago

    [i<]Of course, eBay sellers have GTX 1070s available, as long as you don't mind a $150 markup[/i<] [b<]on top of a $100 markup[/b<]. I'm very interested in the 1070, but by the time I have some cash set aside for one, I'm hoping AMD's lineup will be out and prices will have shifted around some. Even if it's just a $20 or $30 price drop to make things more competitive it would be nice. And who knows, maybe AMD will have something that's more appealing. But this blatant price hike for early adopters is unusually brazen, I think. The fact that people are paying it doesn't help things, though, it just shows the companies that people will happily pay a lot more for a few weeks of bragging rights.

      • Kretschmer
      • 3 years ago

      I like the idea of early adopters subsidizing lower MSRPs for the rest of us.

        • deruberhanyok
        • 3 years ago

        Ha! I can’t argue with that. 🙂

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This