Nvidia board partners release an avalanche of custom GTX 1070s

Today is the day! The day when you can get your eager gerbil paws on a sweet GTX 1070 graphics card that should get you high-end performance at a more reasonable price than ever. To help you on your quest to obtain such a card, we've prepared a round-up of the multiple flavors of non-Founders-Edition GTX 1070s on offer.

EVGA GeForce GTX 1070 ACX 3.0

EVGA's website is having some trouble this morning, which we take to be a good sign for the company's coffers. We managed to pull some information on the company's GTX 1070 cards, though. All variants come with a backplate and EVGA's new ACX 3.0 cooling setup, which the manufacturer says improves cooling performance compared to its ACX 2.0 cooler by some 10-15%. EVGA has three cards on tap, all labeled "Gaming ACX 3.0": a regular, SuperClocked, and FTW edition. The regular Gaming ACX 3.0 card offers 1506MHz base and 1683MHz boost clocks. The SuperClocked version pushes things a little further to 1594MHz base and 1784MHz boost speeds. As for the "FTW" card, EVGA is tight-lipped about its clock speeds, though we'd imagine this card will be both fast and expensive. This version comes with a 12-phase power arrangement, RGB LED lighting, and a dual-BIOS setup.

ROG Strix GeForce GTX 1070

On Asus' camp, so far there's only a single GTX 1070 non-FE card on offer, but it's a good one: the ROG Strix GeForce GTX 1070. This card is clocked particularly hot, at 1657MHz base and 1860MHz boost speeds. Asus fitted the card with a metal backplate and its DirectCU III triple-fan cooling setup. Additional features include RGB LED lighting and headers for GPU-controlled system fans.

MSI is going for a varied selection of GTX 1070s. Along with the versions we covered previously, the company is offering three more cards, labeled Armor, Armor OC, and Gaming X. All variants have a dual-fan cooling setup. The first two cards differ only in clock speeds: 1506MHz base and 1683MHz boost clocks in the Armor version, and 1556MHz base and 1746MHz boost speeds for the Armor OC.

MSI GTX 1070 Gaming X

The Gaming X variant takes things a little further, offering three modes of operation. In the "Silent" mode, the card's base and boost clocks are 1506MHz and 1683MHz. The "Gaming" mode pushes things a fair bit to 1582MHz base and 1771MHz boost frequencies. For those wanting to push things to the limit, there's an "OC" mode on tap, which offers 1607MHz base and 1797MHz boost clocks. The Gaming X card is tricked out in other ways, too. MSI's Twin Frozr VI cooling setup takes care of chilling the card's components, and wraps the card with a metal backplate. As expected of any self-respecting "gaming" product, the Gaming X is kitted with RGB LED lighting.

Zotac GTX 1070 Amp Extreme

Zotac is offering two choices for GTX 1070 cards: the Amp and "Amp Extreme" versions. The Amp card is fitted with a metal backplace, a dual-fan cooling setup, and RGB LED lighting. Base and boost clocks for this version are 1607MHz and 1797MHz. As for the Amp Extreme, Zotac is keeping tight-lipped on its clock speeds. This card comes with a triple-fan cooling setup, so our guess for GPU frequencies is "pretty high."

Gainward GTX 1070 Phoenix GS

Gainward isn't the first name you'd think of when it comes to graphics cards, but the company has three custom GTX 1070s on tap: the Phoenix, Phoenix GS, and Phoenix GLH. (The acronyms stand for "Golden Sample" and "Golden Sample-Goes Like Hell." Yes. Really.) These cards come with an 8-phase power system, dual-fan cooling setups, metal backplates, dual BIOS chips, and LED-lit logos. The three cards all look similar, but a quick inspection under the hood reveals the different clock speed configurations. The Phoenix card has 1506MHz base and 1683MHz boost frequencies. The Phoenix GS pushes those clocks with aplomb: 1632MHz and 1835MHz boost. We've saved the best for last, though. The Phoenix GLH card has 1670MHz base and 1873MHz boost frequencies, which is not a significant departure from the Phoenix GS. However, this is the only GTX 1070 we spotted so far that pushes the RAM clock from the reference speed of 8 GT/s to a full 8.5GT/s, which nets the card 272 GB/s of memory bandwidth.

Comments closed
    • BurntMyBacon
    • 3 years ago

    [quote<] As expected of any self-respecting "gaming" product, the Gaming X is kitted with RGB LED lighting.[/quote<] Good thing you put gaming in quotes or I would have thought you were serious. Why are "gaming" products all blinged out with LEDs again?

    • YukaKun
    • 3 years ago

    Those look like low clocks for the same die that can go up to 2.1Ghz with no issues.

    Are they going to leave that for the final user to try or is there some other reason? Like thermal limiting or voltage limiter of some kind?

    Cheers!

    • DrCR
    • 3 years ago

    Cool that Gainward is paying homage to the Golden Sample branding. That takes me back to the early aughts.

    [quote<]and headers for GPU-controlled system fans.[/quote<] Props to Asus, that's be best cooling idea I've seen for a GPU in some time.

      • Chrispy_
      • 3 years ago

      Damn straight.

      I hate that my case has to warm up enough for the CPU to start feeling the pain before the motherboard decides it needs to do something about the heat.

      In a GPU-equipped PC, the GPU is the most important thing in there by a country mile, only sensible that it should be at the top of the cooling priority list and in charge of its own airflow.

        • kmm
        • 3 years ago

        SpeedFan is my friend and it can be yours too.

          • Spunjji
          • 3 years ago

          If it works with your system, that is!

          • Chrispy_
          • 3 years ago

          SpeedFan is a complicated mess that most often results in a lot of trial and error to give only half-assed results, if it works at all.

          I’ve successfully used speedfan on maybe half a dozen configs, and been dissatisfied on at least twice as many more despite far more invested effort.

      • Spunjji
      • 3 years ago

      That’ll be super useful for water cooling mods, too.

      • UberGerbil
      • 3 years ago

      It’s a brilliant idea and it costs them almost nothing; really, it should be a standard feature on pretty much any serious graphics card above the budget level.

      • Voldenuit
      • 3 years ago

      I would like to see more flexible fan controls in general; such as being able to use any temperature zone(s) to control any given fan(s) in the PC. GPU running an intensive benchmark, but CPU not loaded? Spin up the case intak eand exhaust fans anyway. PSU getting hot? Maybe you need more intake than exhaust. Etc etc.

      Also, all headders should be able to control PWM, VID fans and water pumps. Is that too much to ask for?

    • watzupken
    • 3 years ago

    I think the title should be corrected to say an avalanche of variety of GTX 1070. I was expecting to see an avalanche of supply of these cards when I read the title now. However, that is not the case from what I read online.

      • Voldenuit
      • 3 years ago

      I was like, “release”? More like “announce”, amirite?

      I’ll see myself out…

      • beck2448
      • 3 years ago

      [url<]http://www.guru3d.com/articles_pages/msi_geforce_gtx_1070_gaming_x_review,30.html[/url<] MSI Twin Frozen 1070 is a cool quiet beast. Destroys FuryX.

    • CScottG
    • 3 years ago

    The problem is: these gerbil paws are connected to alligator arms – and I just can’t seem to pick-up the check on one of these..

    [url<]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f95abQuPXaw[/url<]

    • brothergc
    • 3 years ago

    I used to only use Gainward cards , but They do not seem to offer them anymore in the USA , what happened to them ?

      • DrCR
      • 3 years ago

      Not sure if it’s directly related, but Palit started branding cards in their own name. iirc PcPer did a plant tour or the like with them some time ago.

      • auxy
      • 3 years ago

      No US supplier. Same for GALAX, Palit, Inno3D, Colorful… haven’t seen much from Powercolor lately either.

    • goodrob
    • 3 years ago

    Would be nice to have street date estimates on all these cards from them.

    • thebluebumblebee
    • 3 years ago

    GLH? What does that say about the card? Does it make a person think of this:
    [url<]http://s.petrolicious.com/2014/opinion/03-mar/omni-glh-4.jpg[/url<]

    • DancinJack
    • 3 years ago

    The caption for the Gainward pic says 1070, but the stickers/paint (probably stickers) on the card say 1080.

      • Jeff Kampman
      • 3 years ago

      Whoops, fixed.

    • DPete27
    • 3 years ago

    Looks like Asus decided to switch the direction of their heatsink fins and go with heatpipes that run the length of the card instead.

    • wingless
    • 3 years ago

    The Gainward has those Nintendo FamiCom colors! I like it.

      • DPete27
      • 3 years ago

      -1 for a computer generated rendering though.

        • tay
        • 3 years ago

        Those colours tho…

        • Wonders
        • 3 years ago

        It’s a real pic, they photographed it in VR.

    • btehan
    • 3 years ago

    It would be easier to compare all those stats with a chart.

    • chuckula
    • 3 years ago

    YOU CAN DO IT!

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