Asus’ Turbo GTX 1070 flies under the radar

The GeForce GTX 1080 is an awesome card by any measure, but not everyone has $600 or more burning a hole in their pocket. The graphics card power-per-dollar sweet spot tends to fall in a lower price bracket, as evidenced by the historical success of the GeForce GTX 970. Asus has a fresh take on the GTX 970's unofficial successor for our perusal today: the Turbo GeForce GTX 1070. Let's take a good look at this little beastie, shall we?

The first thing you'll notice is the blower-style cooler. Asus says the fan within uses a dual-ball-bearing design, which the company says ought to last longer than regular sleeve-bearing designs. The GPU clocks are set to reference 1506 MHz base and 1683 MHz turbo speeds.

In a nod to VR gamers everywhere, Asus has fitted the card with two HDMI ports instead of one, which allows users to have both a headset and an HDMI monitor plugged in all at once. Two DisplayPort outputs and a DVI port complement the card's output section.

Although the Turbo GeForce GTX 1070 is a relatively plain card devoid of RGB LED lighting, it still packs an LED-lit logo on its side that users can remove and replace with their own designs if the urge strikes. Along with the usual overclocking and monitoring software, gamers get an XSplit Gamecaster license so they can easily show their 360° noscopes kills to the world.

Comments closed
    • Anovoca
    • 4 years ago

    Talk about DeJa Vu
    [url<]https://techreport.com/news/30282/asus-focuses-on-value-with-its-turbo-gtx-1080[/url<] Not to be that guy, but it stands to reason that if they designed a new cooler for the 1080 that they would use the new design on a 1070. This article seems a bit redundant.

    • Bensam123
    • 4 years ago

    There really needs to be a website that rips the coolers off these things and tests them on a heatplate to find out how well they dissipate heat.

    • Shobai
    • 4 years ago

    Ball bearing fans do usually last longer, but they’re also noisier as a rule. It’d be interesting to see how this fan compares to the stock GTX 1070 fan – maybe SPCR will review it?

    • GatoRat
    • 4 years ago

    “Let’s take a good look at this little beastie, shall we?”

    And where is the good look? Repeating a press release and describing what one can clearly see is not a “good look”.

    • tootercomputer
    • 4 years ago

    Well, this is a nice product announcement. Is there a review of it somewhere with benchmarks and specs? The 1070 is the card I intend to purchase for my recently built 6700k system now running a very old video card, but I want a 1070 with a good cooling solution.

      • Mr Bill
      • 4 years ago

      FIRST CLUE, FIRST FIVE WORDS or sentence (whichever comes first) NOT CAPITALIZED; therefore its not a review.

      • slowriot
      • 4 years ago

      It’s default clocks so performance should match any other reference GTX 1070. It’s going to be louder, run hotter and be lower clocked than boards released with custom solutions. Personally, unless you’re intending to do SLI in a case with poor exhaust, I would definitely spend an extra $30 to get a functionality superior option.

    • appaws
    • 4 years ago

    Maybe I should buy something like this…

    …since all I do is rip the cooler off and stick it back in the box anyway. No real reason to buy one of the fancy shmancy third party models with supa heat pipes and everything.

      • Chrispy_
      • 4 years ago

      If you’re watercooling for silence, buy the cheapest card on the market.

      If you’re watercooling for overclocking, don’t you want one of the fancy ones with extra high quality VRMs, more phases and extra PCIe power sockets?

        • Waco
        • 4 years ago

        Non-reference boards are MUCH harder to find waterblocks for.

        • appaws
        • 4 years ago

        That’s a good point. I was just thinking in terms of the GPU being the same, but of course there are differences between the other components.

    • Khali
    • 4 years ago

    Just wow. A GPU without LED’s and gobs of useless plastic bling.

    It looks good compared to just about everything else I have seen in the 1070/1080 line up so far.

      • Acidicheartburn
      • 4 years ago

      It’s deliberately understated, tasteful, and kind of classy. I like it a lot.

        • DoomGuy64
        • 4 years ago

        Just don’t tell DancinJack about it…

      • slowriot
      • 4 years ago

      And likely to be one of the loudest GTX 1070s you can buy. Enjoy!

        • chuckula
        • 4 years ago

        WHAT? I COULDN’T HEAR YOU!

          • anotherengineer
          • 4 years ago

          Over the sound of how AWESOME I AM!!!!

            • sweatshopking
            • 4 years ago

            THESE ARE THE KIND OF COMMENTS I ENVISIONED WHEN I COFOUNDED THIS SITE!

    • djayjp
    • 4 years ago

    The GTX 970 was never the price/performance king.

      • Forge
      • 4 years ago

      Inappropriate response is inappropriate.

    • [TR]
    • 4 years ago

    [quote<]easily show their 360° noscopes kills to the world[/quote<] Are you kidding me? I thought these cards were THE BEST!!!(TM) I'm expecting at least 720º noscopes!

      • tipoo
      • 4 years ago

      It’s why I got the GTX 1080°NoScope

      • Acidicheartburn
      • 4 years ago

      What about 180° noscopes?

    • Voldenuit
    • 4 years ago

    [quote<]In a nod to VR gamers everywhere, Asus has fitted the card with two HDMI ports instead of one, which allows users to have both a headset and an HDMI monitor plugged in all at once. [/quote<] Son of a gun, why are the VR headsets on HDMI in this day and age? I'd rather have 3 DP, 1 HDMI (plus or minus DVI, don't really care anymore). But 3 DP is my minimum, even though I'm only running 2 monitors.

      • morphine
      • 4 years ago

      “Regular” cards have three DP outputs and 1 HDMI.

      • Wonders
      • 4 years ago
        • chuckula
        • 4 years ago

        TL;DR.

      • anotherengineer
      • 4 years ago

      I’d rather have 6 DP. But I guess 4DP and 2 HDMI wouldn’t be so bad……….

    • DPete27
    • 4 years ago

    Pricing? I’m assuming competitive with [url=http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814127948<]MSI's 1070 Aero[/url<] for $410?

      • curtisb
      • 4 years ago

      Newegg lists the Asus card for $389.99. And if they had them in stock, there’s a $30 MIR that takes it to $359.99.

    • chuckula
    • 4 years ago

    [quote<]Asus' Turbo GTX 1070 flies under the radar[/quote<] See, now this is what we mean when we talk about TR's pro-Nvidia bias! You have no proof that the GTX-1070 is [b<][i<]actually[/i<][/b<] capable of flight, but there you go putting it into the headline!

      • morphine
      • 4 years ago

      We tried flying under the radar ourselves, but the size of the Excel frametime sheets gave us away.

        • jensend
        • 4 years ago

        I’ve mentioned this before, but the huge spreadsheet seems like an unwieldy, slow, and brittle tool for this kind of job.

        With something like numpy+matplotlib it wouldn’t be too hard to write something that could take the fraps text output and directly create all the standard graphs you want in a jiffy, and tinkering around with the data to look at anomalies or figure out new charts to create could be done in ipython/jupyter.

          • morphine
          • 4 years ago

          Well, that was meant in jest more than anything.

            • cpucrust
            • 4 years ago

            You are still flying low by stealthily deterring the pro-Nvidia target!

            • jensend
            • 4 years ago

            Of course, and I thought it was funny, but I also thought it made for a good opportunity to bring this up again. I really think that tidier ways of dealing with all that data rather than tinkering with Excel could save you guys a lot of effort in the long run as well as enable new ways to use the information.

          • Voldenuit
          • 4 years ago

          How about a MySQL database with a HTML5/Javascript front end that you can use to query and display all benchmarks by game, driver revision, date, resolution, etc?

          Could be like anandtech’s Bench, but more configurable, more informative and updated more regularly.

            • CampinCarl
            • 4 years ago

            I think combining your idea with jensends idea would be the best:

            python front end to a Postgres or MariaDB backend. Because fsck JavaScript. And Oracle, for that matter.

            But I don’t have the time to volunteer to code it up for them, sadly 🙁

            • Klimax
            • 4 years ago

            Actually, I have basic prototype similar to that. MS-SQL+ Spring with output being displayed using JS graphing lib. (Very basic, only basic selection for graph)

            Someday I’ll finish it for my own perf database…

      • DoomGuy64
      • 4 years ago

      Cue Redbull-esque lawsuit. It doesn’t really give you wings….

      • Anovoca
      • 4 years ago

      Not to mention, if any video card were to have stealth capabilities it would probably be the 1080 FE with all those faceted angles.

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