Dell shows off whiteboard-sized 70″ interactive display

It seems that manufacturers may have found themselves a new market to explore: business- and classrooms. Not to be outdone by Microsoft's Surface Hub, Dell has now joined the fray with its C7017T "interactive conference room monitor."

The CT1017T is a 70", 1920×1080 touch-sensitive display that can read up to 10 invidual touch points at once. Dell bundles the screen with two styluses for input, too. Although the company doesn't spell out the panel type, it's a fair guess that it's based on IPS technology, particularly given its 6-ms response time and 8-bit + AFRC color specification.

The input section comprises a DisplayPort 1.2 connector, two HDMI 1.4 ports along an HDMI port with MHL, and an old-school VGA input. The display includes two 10-watt speakers, along with the requisite audio input and output ports. As proof of its business chops, the C7017T also includes RJ45 and RS232 ports for remote management. Last but not least, there's a built-in four-port USB 3.0 hub with a fast-charging port, along with an extra USB 2.0 port.

Dell is asking $5000 for the CT7017T, a price that's substantially less than the $8,999 that Microsoft wants for the 55" version of its Surface Hub. However, it should be noted that the Surface Hub includes a built-in computer—the C7017T is merely a display. Dell offers a three-year warranty on this giant screen with advance replacement.

Comments closed
    • Shouefref
    • 3 years ago

    A new installment in our series “How to make classrooms as expensive as possible without actually improving study results?”

    • tootercomputer
    • 3 years ago

    Dell ought to put out a demo video showing how this monitor can best be used. I am an adult with a visual impairment (MD) and can imagine how a big bright touch screen could be useful in a classroom, say, for those with visual impairments doing math problems together in a small group. Or learning Excel, or Word, or Goggle, or a physics problems, whatever. A big bright touch screen could potentially be awesome.

    • kamikaziechameleon
    • 3 years ago

    1080p… NOPE!

      • DPete27
      • 3 years ago

      Haha, yeah no kidding. 1080p on a 70″ screen that’s designed to have people standing at arms length away from it….horrible.

    • tipoo
    • 3 years ago

    Apparently everyone in the office already thinks every TV is a touchscreen, judging by the fingerprints lol. Hope this has an oleophobic coating that lasts longer than the few months they seem to last on phones. Day 1 was super easy to keep my 6S clean, now it grimes up if I look at it and takes vigorous wiping to clean off.

    • Zizy
    • 3 years ago

    Eh nope, it isn’t just the computer part driving Surface hub’s price up. It is some other things as well:
    120Hz vs 60 on Dell. I believe this is a big one.
    100 multitouch points vs 10 on Dell. Could be relevant every now and then, but probably not very often. If you have more than 2 people next to the board you generally fucked up already.
    Supports actual pen input – something “active, subpixel accuracy”. Presumably ntrig tech. I didn’t find info for Dell, so I believe their pens are just the usual capacitive crap sold with all these screens.
    IR sensors of people next to the hub, ambient light sensor, cameras and other similar goodies Dell doesn’t have.

    So, Surface Hub clearly is the premium device that imo justifies its higher price by the added stuff it offers. However, are its advantages relevant for the target market and worth the extra cost for typical customers? No idea. I don’t think many fancy paying so much more for these features when the cheaper does what is needed.

      • grazapin
      • 3 years ago

      I think people miss the point with the Surface Hub. It’s a self contained video conferencing system with cameras, echo cancelling microphones, and a Skype for Business client built in. That stuff ain’t cheap. This Dell monitor is just a touch overlay on a dumb monitor with a USB hub and some other extras. It’s a pretty good price point for what it is, but it’s not comparable to everything you get with a Surface Hub.

      And for people scoffing at a 1080p on a 70″ screen, this is for meeting rooms where people could be sitting any distance away from the screen. It’s not just a touch screen for a person standing an arm’s length away, it’s a presentation display for a conference room.

    • Voldenuit
    • 3 years ago

    Ppl complaining about the 1080p resolution are missing the obvious piece of the puzzle: Dell is buying these screens in bulk because their next model is a phablet version.

    • Scrotos
    • 3 years ago

    Sharp has had this for a while. 60, 70, and 80 inch models. Previous ones couldn’t do 10 touch input but I think the current ones can. We have a 80″ one.

    [url<]https://www.sharpusa.com/ForBusiness/PresentationProducts/AQUOSBOARDNew/Models/PNL702B.aspx[/url<] The PC you can get to bolt on the back is pretty crappy. Fan is loud and it broke twice. Oh and the PC option was only like $1200 more. And decently powerful too. So I dunno what dual Xeon the 55" surface has but we got an 80" sharp and PC for the same cost. Ah and the stand too.

    • Shambles
    • 3 years ago

    I find the image amusing. One thing I really don’t want to do is use a spreadsheet with a touch display.

      • smilingcrow
      • 3 years ago

      As used for educational and similar purposes you can just be highlighting cells rather than entering actual data.
      I think you’ve misunderstood what this is used for; it’s not a massive tablet as such but an interactive board. You can enter data via the attached PC in the normal way and additionally interact directly via the screen. So not one or the other.

        • blastdoor
        • 3 years ago

        So are you saying that the touchscreen replaced the mouse but you are supposed to still use a keyboard? In other words, if I want to select a cell and enter data, I walk across the room, tap the cell, walk back to my keyboard, and enter the data? Alternatively, I ask the person standing next to the display to touch the cell and then I enter the data?

        Sounds great.

          • smilingcrow
          • 3 years ago

          To quote myself, ‘so not one or the other’, so it will vary depending on the situation and you can move between the two as required.
          In other words it’s like having a laptop with a touchscreen, it’s just another input method.

          As for the idea of walking across the room to type on a keyboard I imagine that would be more a matter of turning around and using the wireless keyboard on the desk near you.
          If I recall correctly there is usually a desk for the teacher at the front of a class near the board.

          • UberGerbil
          • 3 years ago

          It’s for meetings. Have you never used a whiteboard in a meeting? Everybody in the room has multiple devices, but you’re collaborating on (or at least referring to) one common list / diagram / set of notes at the front of the room. Traditionally that was on a whiteboard, but these days it’s a screen mirroring the display of one of the devices in the room.

          That’s part of the reason a lower resolution can make some sense — one or two people may be standing at the screen, but most of the people who are looking at it are sitting a few feet back, with a conference table between them and the screen, so they’re actually not much closer than a typical TV viewer.

            • blastdoor
            • 3 years ago

            So far my experience with big screens in meetings has been that they are fine for presenting, but attempts to use them in some kind of collaborative interactive way ends up being clunky because the interface is not well suited to the task. It’s just too much of a stretch to extend the KB+M interface to this context.

            I think ST:TNG is closer to the right interface for this sort of thing — voice combined with touch, but no KB. We are probably not too far from that…. Maybe 5 years 😉

          • ludi
          • 3 years ago

          It’s 2016. You can have more than one type of input device functioning concurrently.

            • blastdoor
            • 3 years ago

            [url<]http://www.theonion.com/article/report-stating-current-year-still-leading-argument-35288[/url<]

      • the
      • 3 years ago

      Your manager does because they hate you.

      • Prestige Worldwide
      • 3 years ago

      But think of all the dongs you could draw all over it!!!!!!!!!

    • anotherengineer
    • 3 years ago

    Nice

    We can post this on it!!

    [url<]http://www.techpowerup.com/223692/microsoft-hit-by-first-successful-windows-10-forced-upgrade-lawsuit[/url<]

      • albundy
      • 3 years ago

      oh snap, this works? time to get my golden ticket!

    • Voldenuit
    • 3 years ago

    Someone wrote on one of our conference room whiteboards with permanent marker*. I can’t wait for that to happen to one of these.

    * Yes, I know how to remove it, but have decided to leave it on for ironic/educational purposes.

      • wizardz
      • 3 years ago

      we have a motorized projection screen in front of one of the bigger whiteboard we have.

      someone thought he was writting on the whiteboard
      he was not

      i still chuckle everytime i see it..

      • albundy
      • 3 years ago

      nothing a hammer and chisel cant fix in a jiffy.

        • DPete27
        • 3 years ago

        Right! Lobotomy is the only solution to stupidity.

    • Firestarter
    • 3 years ago

    1080? Seeing as how you’re right in front of that monitor you’ll be able to use the pixels as a grid for your drawings

      • Airmantharp
      • 3 years ago

      I can’t see how pinkie-sized pixels would be incredibly useful here either; 4k would make a lot more sense.

        • adampk17
        • 3 years ago

        Nobody scoffs at 70″ 1080p televisions. I don’t see this being much, if any, different.

          • smilingcrow
          • 3 years ago

          People sit a long way back from a 70″ TV whereas with an interactive touch screen due to its interactive nature you are inches away when interacting with it.
          How significant that is I don’t know.
          Also with classroom displays the people in the front rows are a lot closer than for a typical lounge.

            • adampk17
            • 3 years ago

            If you’re inches away from a 70″ television sure, you can make out pixels if you try, but the screen would hardly be bad.

          • xand
          • 3 years ago

          I scoff at 70″ 1080p televisions! :p

        • UberGerbil
        • 3 years ago

        Hmm, a 70″ diagonal at 1080 resolution is a PPI of 31. That’s coarse, but last I checked the end of my pinkie finger is a bit larger than 1/30″

        I’m not surprised that HP went with a lower-res model to start, but I imagine they’re going to offer this in 4K resolutions eventually (assuming they see any demand). The supply of 4K panels in this size exists, obviously, though the COGs are obviously higher than a 1080 (which, given the shift to 4K in larger TVs especially, are probably almost surplus at this point).

          • bronek
          • 3 years ago

          It’s Dell, not HP. I won’t be surprised to see 4K version either.

          • curtisb
          • 3 years ago

          I will take this over the short-throw projector interactive boards they came out with a few years ago. We have one…getting the laser grid to line up was a PITA. And that’s not to mention that you have to have the serial cable connected to the PC for it to work. Good idea, bad execution. Almost all touchscreen/projector hybrid solutions are, though. SmartBoard was about the closest to usable, but they are even marketing something closer to the Surface Hub now (built-in PC).

          I just wish they would manage to get something bigger than 70″ that’s affordable. I would replace projectors in our classrooms with LED displays in a heartbeat if the price was comparable (I’m not talking about El Cheapo brand projectors either…we’re currently buying 1080p laser/LED hybrid projectors from Panasonic that we can display at 100″ or higher).

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