Calyos workstation passively cools Haswell-E and a Titan X

Belgian cooling vendor Calyos is showing off a completely fanless workstation, and it looks fantastic. The workstation uses a proprietary cooling system, but  it's otherwise built entirely from off-the-shelf parts, including a Core i7-5820K hexa-core processor and a GeForce GTX Titan X GPU. That's some heavy-duty hardware to cool passively, yet Calyos purports to keep both the CPU and graphics card under 75° C while running 3DMark and Prime95.

Calyos is a name that's proably not very familiar to TR readers. The small company was incorporated in 2011, and aims to provide cooling solutions for datacenter and industrial customers using its "loop heat pipe" technology. A fanless workstation with high-end hardware like this might be a good way to drum up interest in the unique cooling system, which Calyos says can dissipate up to 600W of heat.

Update: Systems equipped with Calyos' loop heat pipe coolers will be available in Q4 this year, with a global launch at CES in January. Pricing will start at €1000, though surely not for the monster system above. Thanks to FanlessTech for the tip.

Comments closed
    • faramir
    • 3 years ago

    Holy cow, Haswell-E and Titan X? This is so impressive …

    … for early 2015 …

    … but it’s 2016 today and they could have at the very least gone up to Broadwell-E.

    • Grimmy
    • 3 years ago

    So the [b<]radiator[/b<](external Heat Exchanger) is almost as [b<]BIG as the case[/b<] itself. And probably quite hot. You think this is a good solution???

      • Grigory
      • 3 years ago

      Yes.

      • BoilerGamer
      • 3 years ago

      If it means NO fan noise, definitely.

    • SuperSpy
    • 3 years ago

    I don’t get why they go to all the trouble of using a PCIe extension cable just to rotate the card when there’s clearly a bunch of space below it.

      • Chrispy_
      • 3 years ago

      To keep the overall width of the thing under control, I’d guess.

      The cooling vanes on the right panel must add 3″ of extra width to this case, and it probably already needs some free space to the right of the case for the vanes to be effective. Given that it goes on the right side of your desk (otherwise, what’s with the case window) it’s probably using up a foot of underdesk width as it is!

      • UberGerbil
      • 3 years ago

      This is based on the Lian Li PCO7S case, and that’s how it is designed — mostly, I think, [url=https://picasaweb.google.com/106531253135633425031/PCO7S?authkey=Gv1sRgCNDjxLDyv6jl1gE&feat=embedwebsite#6080699120321189170<]so you can show off the video card[/url<] (the side panel in the original version is entirely tempered glass)

    • albundy
    • 3 years ago

    awww man, it only comes prebuilt. i’d love to get one of these without the pc parts.

    • UberGerbil
    • 3 years ago

    Where’s the radiator? There has to be one. Is it the entire side of the case that we don’t see, or is it even larger than that?

      • RAGEPRO
      • 3 years ago

      It is in fact the entire other side of the case, yes. [url=http://www.calyos-tm.com/wp-content/themes/CalyosTheme/images/PC-Fanless/PC-Fanless-Calyos.jpg<]See here.[/url<]

        • UberGerbil
        • 3 years ago

        Interesting, thanks! So apparently that’s a customized [url=http://www.lian-li.com/en/dt_portfolio/pc-o7s/<]Lian Li PCO7S case[/url<], which has an area of about .3m^2. Hmm, I'm going to have to dig up some of my old engineering texts to figure out what kind of a temperature rise you'd expect dumping 600 watts into that surface area of aluminum.

          • Wirko
          • 3 years ago

          If you’re able to do this kind of calculations, wouldn’t you do another with a 20-inch, 100 rpm fan?

          • RAGEPRO
          • 3 years ago

          To be clear, Calyos says they have passive cooling solutions available up to 600W, not that this specific device can dissipate 600W. 🙂 I probably should have made that more obvious.

      • Krogoth
      • 3 years ago

      The chassis is the radiator.

      Every “100% passive cooling” chassis on the market is like this.

        • UberGerbil
        • 3 years ago

        Yes, but because I didn’t see it in the pics here I thought I’d ask. You never know if they’d dreamed up something better, or at least different.

    • drfish
    • 3 years ago

    [url<]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Loop_heat_pipe[/url<] [quote<]LHPs are similar to heat pipes but have the advantage of being able to provide reliable operation over long distance and the ability to operate against gravity. They can transport a large heat load over a long distance with a small temperature difference.[/quote<]

    • chuckula
    • 3 years ago

    Is it truly passive as in no mechanical moving parts or only fanless as in there is still an active pump?

      • RAGEPRO
      • 3 years ago

      Truly passive. These are not watercoolers.

      • TheRazorsEdge
      • 3 years ago

      The system is described as a heat pump, so I’d assume phase change causes gas to move upwards and make way for cooled liquid to flow in from the reservoir.

      The path lengths, wick, radiator, and reservoir size all have to be designed together in order for this to work, so I wouldn’t expect to see DIY heat pump equipment in the near future, unfortunately.

    • BlackStar
    • 3 years ago

    Interesting. I’ve long been a fan of silent PCs, but in my experience it is nigh impossible to make a watercooled system truly silent. The pump causes vibrations that have a more invasive sound signature than the wind rustle of PWM fluid-bearing fans.

    I can very well imagine that this is significantly quieter than air cooling when running the system at 100%, but in normal desktop use I would expect a well-made air cool system to be more silent.

    It would be awesome is SPCR did a review of this system.

    Edit: on their website they are saying there is no pump involved. Is all circulation based on water vapor instead? Interesting.

      • TwoEars
      • 3 years ago

      Just make it a really long water loop and place the pump and radiator in a basement or closet or something. Job done. But I prefer silent air cooling using Noctua and PWM controlled fans instead.

      • DarkUltra
      • 3 years ago

      I’vd had four different pumps for the past 15 years of custom watercolling my PCs and mounted properly they all have been inaudible. The latest is a Maelstrøm 5-1/4 dual bay pump and reservoir and it is completely silent when plugged into the CPU fan header and controlled by Asus Fan Xpert.

      [url<]http://jooh.no/index.php/2016/07/03/building-gaara-i7-5960x-gtx-980-ti/[/url<]

    • DPete27
    • 3 years ago

    Those supply/return lines are TINY. And as such, fragile.

      • Pitabred
      • 3 years ago

      Pretty sure workstation class machines aren’t designed for tinkering, though. You buy it configured how you want it, and leave it alone. Maybe toss some more RAM in eventually.

      • RAGEPRO
      • 3 years ago

      I suspect they aren’t all that fragile as they will be relatively hard pipes. They’re heatpipes, not water tubes. 🙂

      • Chrispy_
      • 3 years ago

      There are far more fragile things in a PC than those lines.

      • jihadjoe
      • 3 years ago

      They have to be tiny though in order to work as a passive system. Capillary action doesn’t work when the lines are too big.

    • maxxcool
    • 3 years ago

    …. while in a freezer …

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