Razer Abyssus V2 mouse gives gamers the essentials for $50

Razer is making its dizzying range of gaming mice more accessible today. The Abyssus V2 offers a 5000-DPI optical sensor, three-color backlighting (in dark blue, light blue, and Razer's trademark green), rubberized side grips, and four programmable buttons for a fairly wallet-friendly $50.

While Razer claims this mouse has four programmable buttons, only the DPI and middle-click really seem configurable to us, since we'd expect most gamers will want to keep the left and right main buttons set up for that purpose. Still, this is an attractive-looking ambidextrous gaming mouse that doesn't cost a lot. For gamers or lefties who just want the basics, that could be just enough to make the Abyssus compelling.

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    • Wall Street
    • 3 years ago

    Many reviewers seem to think of three button ambidexturous mice as ‘cheap’ mice that are designed to bring down the price to make the mouse more accessable. People who are cheap generally aren’t buying anything Razor or Logitech (except maybe the G100s, which can be had for <$20).

    I think that you are missing the point. As someone who plays FPS games with a fingertip grip and at very low sensitivities, the small, lightweight, three button, ambidexturous design is superior to other designs. The G502 is way too heavy and the Deathadder too large for a lot of gamers – they are generally not very good mice. You will see a suprising number of pros using Logitech G100s, Zowie Mico and Razor Abyssus and they aren’t constrained on costs and they respective sponsors would even prefer if they used the more expensive large wireless mice, but the small mice are for winners.

    • Firestarter
    • 3 years ago

    I kinda consider thumb buttons to be essential. Maybe not necessarily for gaming but definitely for browsing

      • Pville_Piper
      • 3 years ago

      $50 for some colored lights and no thumb buttons… Meh.

      I used to think Razer was all that until my death Adder died. I was looking for a new mouse and the Corsair M-60 with the sniper button intrigued me.

      I picked one up and immediately noticed it was much more accurate that the Adder. I love the fact that I can set 3 levels of speed easily. I didn’t like the sniper button slowing me down, but it works really well to speed up the rotation of turrets and things in BF3 and BF4!

      • MEATLOAF2
      • 3 years ago

      Thumb buttons are indeed essential, as far as I’m concerned. Mostly for browsing, but some games do benefit.

        • Voldenuit
        • 3 years ago

        I like the [url=http://www.roccat.org/en-GB/Products/Gaming-Mice/Kova/<]Smartcast buttons[/url<] on the Roccat Kova, I have one and use them for melee and reload in Overwatch.

    • Voldenuit
    • 3 years ago

    Never razer again. Between the razer software that wants you to login to an account to use the mouse, and their rubberized coating that literally melts off the mouse in a couple of years, I’m done with them.

    The logitech G303 Daedalus is 12,000 dpi and $49.99.

    The Roccat Kova is 7,000 dpi and $49.99.

    I’d recommend either over any razer, any day.

    EDIT: Apparently, I can’t spell. That wouldn’t be the first time.

      • Firestarter
      • 3 years ago

      my deathadder works just fine without their software, it defaults to a 1600dpi and 500hz mode which works well for me

      • Redundant
      • 3 years ago

      After years of using Logitech, I tried a Razer once. Then another. Then another. Then I returned the third try all within the 30 days and went back to Logitech. Logitech’s hardware is pretty nice, but over the years their gaming software has really become a huge plus too (macro abilities). Logitech still hasn’t made a perfect mouse for my gaming preferences, but they are the closest compared to other brands. I own three different types and usually it’s more about the number of buttons and their placement. Also, on numerous occasions I have had G13s, Mice, and other faults happen within the 3 years and never had a problem getting a brand-new replacement. Patience is certainly necessary on support ticket responses, but in the end you win. Long-winded I suppose. TLDR: Ya I agree with you.

      • Rikki-Tikki-Tavi
      • 3 years ago

      I have always used Logitech, but recently I’m disappointed. Both my headset and my mouse have serious issues after only a short while. It sucks, because to get it fixed, I would have to send them in for 3 weeks and I don’t want that.

      For the Headset, its a common issue that the joint cracks. It holds together for now, but when it completely breaks, I will go buy a Sennheiser, I think. Too bad, it’s otherwise a great headset. I am mad at Logitech here, because they refuse to just send me a spare part (it’s an easy repair).

        • MEATLOAF2
        • 3 years ago

        A few weeks ago I complained to Logitech support about a double clicking issue on my 2.5 year old G602, they sent me a new one, and let me keep the old one, which still works outside of the occasional double click, so I gave it to my sister.

        Took a while to get it shipped and between responses, but like Redundant said above, patience is required, otherwise they had very good customer service as far as I’m concerned.

        I would prefer they use beefier switches in the first place instead of just replacing the mouse with a new one, but I’m not gonna complain about a fresh mouse with no questions asked (outside of the usual, and useless, troubleshooting steps they make you go through).

          • ch┬Áck
          • 3 years ago

          They did something similar for me as well.
          My old G9x would sometimes ‘drop’ things as I dragged them across the desktop.
          This was at the very end of the 3yr warranty.
          They didn’t sell the G9x by then, but told me to choose anything from the logitech store $99 or less. That’s how I got my G700s.

      • Chrispy_
      • 3 years ago

      It takes a lot for someone to say “never again” but [i<]so many people[/i<] say this about Razer, and I've been stung by them twice myself. From firmware to drivers, design-flaw to QC issue, Aesthetics to durability, I have good reason to shop elsewhere. If there was no other competition for gaming mice, I'd consider re-evaluating Razer hardware to see if I could tolerate the problems, but that's just not necessary. I'd need to be stung by all the other dozens of gaming mouse manufacturers before I'd consider Razer again. My time is worth more than Razer would seem to care about and I'm not going through the rinser again without very good reason.

      • colinstu12
      • 3 years ago

      The scrollwheel on my deathadder broke only after a year, and after reading up on the forums… this is apparently super common. Everyone’s solution was ‘buy another Razer’ …. HAH, nope.

      Bought a Logitech G500 and haven’t looked back. Its braided cable hasn’t frayed, its scroll wheel still works, and finish hasn’t worn off at all.. ALL unlike the Razer. And I’ve had this mouse several times longer than it too. Still going strong.

      • NovusBogus
      • 3 years ago

      I like my two Razers’ ergonomics a lot, but it’s unlikely I’ll buy another one due to the software issue. Heck, one of them is plugged into a RHEL system so software isn’t even available. It’s aggravating that a company that played a key role in the emergence of smart peripherals regressed from fire-and-forget products with onboard controllers to a gotta-login software layer. What were they thinking?

      Logitech hasn’t taken their high-end product line in a direction that I like, but I agree that there’s lots of good options out there.

        • Voldenuit
        • 3 years ago

        One thing I like about my Roccat is that the software is completely optional. Once I program in settings, functions and button mapping into a profile, the information is stored on the mouse (5 profiles can be stored in the mouse at one time, and you can load/unload profiles using the swarm software). I can plug the mouse into a completely new computer and it would remember all my settings.

        I always unload Swarm from memory after I’m done using it anyway because I don’t like stray processes eating up RAM and CPU time.

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