Opera set to sell core units to Chinese business for $600 million

Opera Software, best known for its desktop and mobile browser, may soon become Chinese instead of Norwegian. The company is inking a $600 million deal with the Chinese Kunqi consortium (which includes Qihoo 360 and Kunlun) for the acquisition of a number of Opera's divisions.

Kunqi is offering the money in exchange for Opera's mobile and desktop browser software, its "performance and privacy apps" division, technology licensing business, and the company's stake in nHorizon. Both companies expect to ink the deal in "late third quarter." The Chinese consortium will not acquire Opera Mediaworks, Apps & Games, and Opera TV. Reuters reports that the business units that Kunqi is leaving behind net Opera a combined revenue of $467 million in 2015.

Today's $600 million bid is actually a revision of a bigger $1.2-billion deal first announced back in February. According to Reuters, Opera and Kunqi decided to try a different tack after realizing that the original deal would have to go through U.S-China regulatory verifications, something which would have delayed the purchase by up to a year.

When news of the February deal's failure hit the Internet, Opera's shares tumbled by 17%. However, since announcing the revised acquisition plan, the company's shares climbed to 11% more than their February value. Opera Chairman Sverre Munck told Reuters that investors are likely to see an "extraordinary dividend" come autumn.

Comments closed
    • cynan
    • 3 years ago

    Hopefully that Severe Monk will lighten up a bit after he gets his fat cash payout. With any luck it won’t lead him down the path of worldly temptation…

    • albundy
    • 3 years ago

    Yoo stop make bing bong! Evwy bing bong two cent!

    [url<]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HOOK0p-hPnY[/url<]

    • Stochastic
    • 3 years ago

    I recently switched to Opera on Android because it has a built-in ad blocker. Seems to work quite well and saves me a fair bit of data vs. Chrome. Plus, scrolling feels smoother and more responsive than Chrome.

    On my desktop I’m still a Chromie, although I’ve dabbled with Vivaldi a few times. Maybe I’ll give it another go now…

    • fhohj
    • 3 years ago

    this doesn’t affect me because I use Firefox. have since about 0.7, because it’s a good browser, community-maintained by a non-proft, and I don’t need to be counting beans looking to shave a few milliseconds of render time when I waste more of them simply deciding what to click or fumbling the mouse when I reach for it.

    unfortunately though I know I’m not browser-cool anymore. I sad. I cry.

      • Sam125
      • 3 years ago

      I switched to Chrome for now and other than the memory hogging, it’s the fastest and smoothest browser outside of Linux-only Lynx. Firefox is still cool if you have the right add-ons.

    • SuperSpy
    • 3 years ago

    I’ve used Vivaldi for the last 6-8 months now on my laptop, but have stuck with Opera on my desktop because Vivaldi doesn’t yet have the ability to rip tabs off on window and stack them on another (it technically has the feature, but instead of actually taking the active tab and moving it, it actually just kills the existing tab and loads the URL again in the new tab).

    I guess I’m going to have to learn to live with that on my desktop.

    • DarkUltra
    • 3 years ago

    I used Opera and now uses Vivaldi just becsuse of the very handy option of using keyboard keys 1 and 2 to cycle between tabs.

    Opera with its new Modern look is very ugly, Vivaldi looks better but is a little slower than Opera.

      • stdRaichu
      • 3 years ago

      1/2 to cycle through tabs was my most sorely missed features of shifting away from Opera, but I did find a FF/PM extension that let you implement it:
      [url<]http://keyconfig.petricek.net/[/url<] Also long-live ctrl-alt-Z as "reopen last tab" B^) I need to give Vivaldi another whirl...

      • crabjokeman
      • 3 years ago

      Apparently, it doesn’t have a spell checker?

      • Prion
      • 3 years ago

      Ugly isn’t the half of it– as far as I’m concerned Opera died after the desktop version moved to being based on Chrome. Even 3-4 years later I can’t do all of the customizations that made Opera my preferred browser beforehand, so I just suck it up and use Chrome instead.

    • Meadows
    • 3 years ago

    Opera hasn’t been Opera in a while, anyway. Granted, their implementation was still more CPU-friendly and resource-friendly than Chrome’s defaults, but I could count the number of extra customisations on one hand. So far, Vivaldi is the new “Opera”.

      • sweatshopking
      • 3 years ago

      Yep. Vivaldi and edge for me now.

    • ronch
    • 3 years ago

    It’s crazy how much money companies pay to acquire other companies or assets. For an obscure app like Opera, $600M? Back in 2006 I remember reading about how Google paid something like $1.6B for YouTube and I was like, (@_@;). But YouTube was at least quite relevant.

    When you look at your money troubles and see all these companies it’s enough to make you wish you could win the PowerBall. But of course it doesn’t work that way.

      • Notafanboy
      • 3 years ago

      Given how the tech market is, what they are buying is access to Opera’s current customer base and brand.

      Advertising has and will always be the largest market on earth

      • w76
      • 3 years ago

      Valuations are stretched right now, comparable to historical all time highs, but I had no idea Opera had that large a business to begin with!

    • ronch
    • 3 years ago

    Pretty soon China will own everything. Go on, West, keep selling all your assets to China. And they’ll keep stocking up on armaments and building artificial islands.

    • Captain Ned
    • 3 years ago

    Would have gotten a much bigger price a few years ago, but that’s the cost of “intellectual certainty” in the face of an adverse market.

    • Krogoth
    • 3 years ago

    The folks at Opera saw the writing on the wall.

    They might as well get an handsome return on the IP before its value evaporates.

    • bthylafh
    • 3 years ago

    Too much money sloshing around at the top.

    • PrincipalSkinner
    • 3 years ago

    Opera was my primary browser until Chrome came out. Haven’t looked back since.

      • ronch
      • 3 years ago

      I loved Opera before they became a Chrome clone. Been keeping an eye on them and waiting for the right time to jump back but after this news bit here, er, no thanks.

        • kvndoom
        • 3 years ago

        They’re ALL chrome clones now… ugh. At least there used to be some difference in the interfaces. Now you can’t tell one from the other.

        I mostly use Pale Moon, but so many sites rely on user agents instead of just rendering the damn page that I have to keep a backup browser handy.

          • DoomGuy64
          • 3 years ago

          Cyberfox works better than Pale Moon, also no extension incompatibility.

            • kvndoom
            • 3 years ago

            Thanks for the tip! Using it now and really loving it! I’ve got it pretty darn close to the classic Firefox look. Whoa, large icons and text at the same time? Whodathunkit???

        • Third_Eye
        • 3 years ago

        Me too. I too am fan of Opera from its “Presto” days. I still love its download manager/skinning engine and nothing comes as simple as that. The Chrome based version 38.x still has not caught up to 12.x in some areas.

        Unfortunately as days pass, more and more websites do not work well with Opera 12.x.
        My bank sites started to misbehave despite changing the user string. Then when Yahoo mail started to misbehave, then grudgingly I started to use the “Chrome” Opera.

        I thought that Otter Browser (https://sourceforge.net/projects/otter-browser), will carry the baton, but then found it is very alpha in quality and cannot replace Opera 12.x and hence sticking with 12.x whenever possible. 🙁

    • smilingcrow
    • 3 years ago

    I remember using Opera and at one point you had to pay for it. Yikes!
    Then it just started having serious issues rendering certain sites so I moved on.

    • Sam125
    • 3 years ago

    That last sentence has me triggered and yet I still hold on to my profitable position with BAC shares and a measly NICKEL dividend per share.

    • TheRazorsEdge
    • 3 years ago

    Get spied on by a Chinese company instead of the American ones.

    In one fell swoop, Opera managed to make Apple, Google, and Microsoft look good.

      • DPete27
      • 3 years ago

      People still use Opera?

        • Vivaldi
        • 3 years ago

        OK, I’ll bite, as this strikes me as a rather “Western” reaction.

        Bruce Lawson (Opera) gave a great Velocity session on how they are thinking big–highly recommended:

        [url<]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f6As5HEkG5E[/url<] Per: [url<]http://www.operasoftware.com/press/facts,[/url<] Opera commands over 350+ million users--making browsers for desktops, mobile, television, watches, in-car dashboards, and so on. -Viv

          • skitzo_zac
          • 3 years ago

          Ha, Opera facts from the user Vivaldi. That made me smile.

        • smilingcrow
        • 3 years ago

        No, they are being given $600M out of charity. 😉

        For the desktop when I think of Opera it’s closer in my timeline to Netscape than Chrome.

      • Krogoth
      • 3 years ago

      Protip: Data-snooping and collection has been going on the internet since it became commercialized.

      • End User
      • 3 years ago

      Apple has always looked good.

        • ronch
        • 3 years ago

        The years between Steve’s departure and return were pretty sad for Apple.

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