Phanteks breaks into custom liquid cooling with its Glacier G1080

Phanteks is probably best known for its wide-ranging line of computer cases, but the company has a full folio of cooling products as well. Recently, that folio has expanded to include custom liquid cooling parts with the Glacier G1080. This water block is a full-coverage unit for the GeForce GTX 1080 Founders Edition. It features configurable RGB LED lighting that can be linked into the lighting system on a compatible Phanteks case. Phanteks also has an adapter to connect the lighting to some system boards.

The block itself is made from black and clear acrylic, with an aluminum backplate and a nickel-plated copper cold plate. Phanteks used DuPont Viton in the gaskets, which it says will hold up better to temperature variations in the cooling fluid compared to other companies' silicone rubber gaskets. The Glacier G1080 isn't available yet, but you can pre-order the block at Phanteks' online store for $129.99.

Comments closed
    • Anovoca
    • 4 years ago

    Nothing helps provide a nice clean looking build (the end goal of a well done water loop) like introducing 3 distinct cables to power the LEDs on the block.

    I’m just glad they routed them to the bottom of the block so, you-know, you have all that room to bend them around and can get at them easily (possibly tuck them under your m.2 card if you have one right there (who needs airflow, you’re water-cooling)); unlike if they, say, made a single cable run out of the top next to the VGA cards power connector which could be tied to an routed along the 8-pin PCI cable.

      • cynan
      • 4 years ago

      LED power cables? Naw. Thems just the detcord attached to charges Phanteks is using to [i<]break into custom liquid cooling[/i<]. They're really about to blow the lid off of this niche enthusiast market segment by entering it with a bang.

    • sweatshopking
    • 4 years ago

    Water cooling is still too much trouble

    • sweatshopking
    • 4 years ago

    Water cooling is still too much trouble

    • Voldenuit
    • 4 years ago

    Um… yay. So on top of paying FE tax for the FE card, now spend extra to get a decent cooler?

    Hopefully, it’ll be compatible with a wide variety of custom cards out there, although the extra-large PCBs of the MSI Gaming G/X and Asus Strix are probably not (puts on glasses) in the cards.

    • Chrispy_
    • 4 years ago

    Is that a nickel/copper block cold-forged into an aluminium billet?

    I don’t watercool anymore but I greatly preferred it when I didn’t have to mix metals in my loop. Additives can help with a mixed metal loop but you’re pretty much asking for trouble. At least it’s acrylic so you can see the electroplating and clean/re-additive as you see the problem appear.

    Still, I much prefer low-maintenance over minor cost-savings at the start. The extra few bucks for an all copper waterblock will pay for themselves by the time you’ve done your first strip, clean and rebuild.

      • willmore
      • 4 years ago

      You remind me that I should flush and clean my loop again. Thanks.

      • brucethemoose
      • 4 years ago

      I think it’s all nickel plated anyway, right?

      I’d like to think that manufacturers, of all people, would know not to mix metals that are inside the loop like that.

        • Waco
        • 4 years ago

        You’d think.

      • cynan
      • 4 years ago

      [quote<]Is that a nickel/copper block cold-forged into an aluminium billet?[/quote<] Pretty sure the entire portion that comes into contact with water is nickel plated copper. The articles only mention of aluminum is for the back plate (which goes on the underside of the card)

        • Chrispy_
        • 4 years ago

        That’s what I thought at first, but then on the Phanteks website they showcase it with no backplate, leaving the original plastic OEM one in place.

        That fact, combined with the fact that the silver you can see through the acrylic looks dull with the exception of the finned area makes me think that the “block” is just the little bit about 1″ square, and it’s pressed and then machined flat into a CNC’ed aluminium billet.

        I’d like to be wrong, because then that means that the only metal the water is in contact with is nickel-plated copper, but the product on the website doesn’t appear to have a Phankteks backplate for the rest of the card, and that nickel on the [i<]front[/i<]plate sure does look awfully matte finish - too matte to be shiny glossy nickel IMO....

          • cynan
          • 4 years ago

          The picture of the back of the card on the Phanteks website looks like it could be a black anodized aluminum back plate (and perhaps that’s the same material that frames the waterblock portion of the cooler on the front, pictured above. Then again, maybe that’s just black acrylic. Either way, there looks to be a back plate of some sort)

            • cynan
            • 4 years ago

            OK my bad. That back plate in the photo clearly looks to be the stock Nvidia back plate..

    • DrCR
    • 4 years ago

    The problem with this glacier route — your video card will freeze up and slow to a crawl.

    As a side note, if silicone doesn’t due the trick for the temperature fluctuations in a WC loop, someone’s WCing wrong, very wrong.

      • Redocbew
      • 4 years ago

      I’m not even sure how someone would do that unless they had a pump which was ridiculously slow.

      • willmore
      • 4 years ago

      Yeah, considering it’s used in rocket engines, I think it’ll stand up to temperature fluctuations just fine. Marketing…..

        • DPete27
        • 4 years ago

        Yeah…the (silicone?) O rings did juuust fine on the Challenger space shuttle….

          • TheRazorsEdge
          • 4 years ago

          The Challenger O-rings were designed to expand during launch, which did not happen due to cold temperatures.

          Since basic watercooling rigs do not rely on expanding O-rings or freezing temperatures, I think they’re fine.

        • Rikki-Tikki-Tavi
        • 4 years ago

        Rocket engineer here: I prefer ptfe-coated steel c-rings when working with cryogenics.

        They go for 100-200€/pop.

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This