Seagate Nytro family now includes a 2TB M.2 SSD

When Seagate purchased LSI's flash business, it acquired a range of PCI Express SSDs wearing "Nytro" branding. Those drives currently come in PCIe add-in card, M.2 stick, and U.2 2.5" form factors, and today Seagate is announcing that it is releasing 2TB drives in that family. The company says this announcement marks an industry first in that the 2TB Nytro XM1440 M.2 NVMe SSD is "the highest-capacity enterprise-class" drive of its type.

The Nytro family encompasses a bunch of drives, but the news today primarily concerns the XF1440 and XM1440. The XF1440 is a 2.5" NVMe SSD that connects to the host with a U.2 connector, while the XM1440 is essentially the same thing in an M.2 gumstick. Both drives are available as either "endurance-optimized" or "capacity-optimized" models.

The capacity-optimized models come in 480GB, 960GB, and 1920GB sizes. Meanwhile, the endurance-optimized versions trade a bit of storage for a three-full-drive-write-per-day rating ten times the 0.3-drive-write-per-day rating of the capacity-optimized models. Those disks come in 400GB, 800GB, and 1600GB sizes. The same drives are also available for systems lacking U.2 or M.2 connectors as the Nytro XP7102, a PCIe add-in card only available in 800GB or 1600GB endurance-optimized flavors.

Like most NVMe SSDs, the drives offer impressive performance, at least on reads. Sequential reads scale up to 2500 MB/s, while Seagate rates the drives at up to 240,000 IOPS for random reads. Write performance is less inspiring, at "only" 900 MB/s sequential and 40K IOPS on the endurance-optimized models, or 15K IOPS on the capacity-optimized drives. Seagate warranties the drives for 5 years in either case.

Comments closed
    • 0x800300AF
    • 4 years ago

    I guess I’m the only one who’s 1st thought was “hmm.. 4 Terabyte Radeon SSG ?”

    • albundy
    • 4 years ago

    looking forward to a dual m.2 raid 0 build on a Gigabyte G1 z170. i have a feeling u.2 will carry a premium if its marketed with much hype. nice to see seagate back in the solid state arena. the more the merrier so prices can come down.

    • egon
    • 4 years ago

    Press release begins with:

    [i<]The two terabyte (TB) version of its Nytro® XM1440 M.2 non-volatile memory express (NVMe) Solid State Drive (SSD) is the highest-capacity, enterprise-class M.2 NVMe SSD [b<]available today[/b<]...[/i<] Yet concludes with: [i<]The 2TB Nytro XM1440 M.2 NVMe SSD will be available through channel partners [b<]in November 2016[/b<].[/i<]

      • derFunkenstein
      • 4 years ago

      They sent that press release back through time.

        • the
        • 4 years ago

        Seagate is SkyNet.

    • DPete27
    • 4 years ago

    Wow, adding an extra 20% overprovisioning increases endurance by 10x?

      • tay
      • 4 years ago

      Is write amplification really that bad? I suppose if you calculate worst case scenarios it can be.

        • anotherengineer
        • 4 years ago

        It can be bad under certain circumstances. Sometime 30x !!!

        [url<]https://communities.intel.com/thread/46941[/url<]

    • Airmantharp
    • 4 years ago

    Gotta ask: does Seagate refer to their solid-state drives as ‘disks’ too?

      • faramir
      • 4 years ago

      Only the flat ones.

      • SlappedSilly
      • 4 years ago

      No, the disks are the things you put [b<]in[/b<] the drives. Why is nobody complaining when people call solid-state storage 'drives'? Err... well, I guess I just did. nvm.

        • Pwnstar
        • 4 years ago

        They’ve been known as SSDs for a while now. Solid State Drive.

      • Meadows
      • 4 years ago

      I’m sure Zak will correct it in a moment.

        • RAGEPRO
        • 4 years ago

        Heh, ‘disk’ is no more or less correct than ‘drive’. SSDs have neither, so what ever. I’ve even seen them called “solid state disk drives”.

          • Airmantharp
          • 4 years ago

          Well, a [url=http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/disk<]'disk'[/url<] is something round that usually spins, at least when referring to storage. I just think it's funny that the term gets applied still even though SSDs aren't round, don't spin, or really move at all when performing their primary function of storing and retrieving stored data :D.

            • Fonbu
            • 4 years ago

            Maybe just Solid State Storage….SSS

          • derFunkenstein
          • 4 years ago

          solid state disc drive storage platter

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