Redmi Pro phone offers a metal body and dual cameras on a budget

Chinese up-and-comer Xiaomi introduced an impressive new budget smartphone today. The Redmi Pro boasts dual cameras, a brushed-aluminum body, and a 5.5" OLED display for RMB 1499 (or $225) and up.

The Redmi Pro comes in three basic configurations. The most expensive Pro, at RMB 1999 (or about $300) is powered by a Mediatek Helio X25 SoC comprising two Cortex-A72 cores and eight Cortex-A53s in a big.LITTLE arrangement. According to Mediatek, the big cores in this arrangement runs at up to 2.5GHz, while four of the A53s run at 2GHz and the remaining four run at 1.55GHz. Graphics power comes courtesy of an ARM Mali-T880 GPU. The SoC is backed with 4GB of RAM, and the device has 128GB of onboard storage.

The RMB 1699 ($255) Pro uses the same SoC, but it loses a gigabyte of RAM and drops to 64GB of storage. The base RMB 1499 ($225) model uses the older Helio X20 SoC, 3GB of RAM, and 32GB of storage.

The dual-camera arrangement on the Redmi Pro is a first for a device in this price range, as far as we know. Xiaomi uses a 13MP Sony main sensor for image capture and a 5MP Samsung unit for depth information. With those two inputs, the Redmi Pro can modify depth-of-field effects after the fact with a dedicated image signal processor.

Xiaomi curiously doesn't list the resolution of the Redmi Pro's display in its press materials, but Engadget confirms it's a 1920×1080 unit. The Pro is powered by a 4,050mAh battery, and it has a front fingerprint sensor for easy unlocking. Charging and connectivity are both handled by a USB Type-C port. The Redmi Pro will doubtless be available in China soon, but we wouldn't expect this phone to come to the USA.

Comments closed
    • ronch
    • 4 years ago

    Goldilocks and the Three…. Redmi Pro phones.

    I’d go for Papa bear’s phone though, given how the difference between the cheapest and most expensive is just $75, and with 128GB in there you could just the second SIM/microSD slot for a second SIM.

    Btw, the three versions of this phone are called Standard, High, and Exclusive Edition. For $300 you can consider being Exclusive. Beat that, Apple.

    • ronch
    • 4 years ago

    These cheaper but still good Chinese brands are setting the bar higher and higher for affordability. I’m not pro-China given all the crap they’re doing but man, these prices are hard to ignore. Maybe part of the cost is subsidized by the Commie government?

    • Jigar
    • 4 years ago

    My wife is currently using Redmi Note 3, its an excellent phone, i am surprise how the company build such a solid product for the price that i gave them.

    • NeelyCam
    • 4 years ago

    MicroSD slot?

      • Jigar
      • 4 years ago

      Yes it has one. They use hybrid slot meaning, you can either use a second sim or use the same slot as SD card.

        • ronch
        • 4 years ago

        That sucks. In this day and age of people having more than one network and tons of media files one carries around, a proper phone should have 2 SIM slots and a memory card slot. Heck, I think some phones even have 3 or 4 SIM slots. Overkill, I know.

    • derFunkenstein
    • 4 years ago

    The biggest issue with importing this phone to a location outside its native region is that it may not support all the LTE bands. Most US-based reviews for Xiaomi’s phones do a good job of pointing out what’s supported. For example, [url=http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2016/03/xiaomi-mi-5-review-its-hard-to-argue-with-305-for-a-snapdragon-820/<]the Mi 5[/url<] lacks all of the bands used in the US. That's fine, as long as you can get by on HPSA+ in your area or wherever you travel. Like Jeff said, these aren't likely to come to the US, so the "wrong" version will have to suffice if you want to get on this train.

    • pranav0091
    • 4 years ago

    My next phone 🙂

    Pretty sure that this phone is going to sport a Snapdragon 650 when it enters India, just like the Redmi Note 3. So that makes the likely list to be S650 + 3GB RAM + 32GB ROM + SD Card support + 4000 MAh battery + 5.5 inch FHD OLED panel + Speakers at the bottom. Whats not to like?

    The best bit certainly has to be the fingerprint reader on the front. After championing the “natural” placement of the fingerprint reader at the back of the phone for years, getting a Redmi Note 3 suddenly made me realise my folly. The front is the best place for the fingerprint reader, simply because its nearly as accessible as the back in general use and outright wins when the phone is placed on a table – which is like ~6+ hours each day for me. The icing on the cake is that the security updates come in nice and quick, and the OS is lovely and at the same time deceptively powerful – even compared to “stock” Android.

    Ah, and then there is the price – what 15k INR? Where do I signup?

    Other phonemakers have to be worried. My current RN3 is the best phone I have ever owned or used, and thats a list that used to include the L920, L520, Xperia Ray, Moto G, Moto E, and plenty of exposure to Samsung and Apple’s bests. At nearly one-third the price, this is a no brainer.

    As for the design – they look IPhone-ish, but then the current Iphones only look HTC-ish. If anything MIUI looks far more coherent than the plastering of the bubble-gum color that is the current IOS. Only Nokia made prettier phones, and the old HTC. Hell, for this price the finesse and attention to detail that Xiaomi puts into even their low end devices is nothing short of amazing. These outclass the Galaxies in feel and looks and how.

    To say I’m excited would be an understatement.

    • DPete27
    • 4 years ago

    I despised the rounded rectangle lawsuit just as much as the next guy. But when I see these Chinese phones that are CLEARLY iPhone copies, it does bug me a little.

      • nico1982
      • 4 years ago

      I guess the horizontal antenna stripes are deceiving you. And the speaker at the bottom. Maybe color options. Are color trademarkable? 😛

      Overall shape is closer to HTC, front button is Samsung like and camera placement is LG/Nokia. It looks like an Asus Zenfone to me, way more than any iPhone.

        • Takeshi7
        • 4 years ago

        Colors are trademark-able. That’s why T-Mobile sues a lot of companies for using the the color magenta, even though there is absolutely no way consumers would confuse any of their products for T-Mobile products.

        • DreadCthulhu
        • 4 years ago

        Actually you can trade mark colors in certain circumstances. [url=http://www.colormatters.com/color-and-marketing/color-branding-legal-rights<]Link[/url<] though I don't think that quite applies here.

        • DPete27
        • 4 years ago

        That was actually the direction I was going when I started my original comment. Looks like a copy of multiple major phones, and hardly any new design decisions besides choosing what elements to copy from whom. Perhaps that in itself is original enough?

        I am aware that HTC had the horizontal antenna stripes before Apple.

          • iBend
          • 4 years ago

          If you’re aware, why did you said “CLEARLY iPhone copies”

      • DreadCthulhu
      • 4 years ago

      Seems different enough to me; oval versus round home button, and two centered rear cameras versus one offset camera make it obviously not a copycat.

      • ronch
      • 4 years ago

      Well, for one, China is the great Satan of Copycats, and two, I suppose being derivatives of other designs is inevitable when practically all these smart phones are rectangular slabs of glass and metal/plastic. Yes I know it bugs me a little too and someone could say, “Hey, nice iPhone, er.. sorry, I thought that’s an iPhone.” and you feel you just bought a ripoff product but I guess, given the price, most pholks won’t mind.

    • krazyredboy
    • 4 years ago

    Suddenly, the conspiracy theorist in me is wondering “Does having the fingerprint scanner on Chinese Phones (given their history of embedding hacks in their hardware sold) allow them to begin stealing our fingerprints, along with our identities, now?”

    Sorry… I’ll put my tinfoil hat back on, now.

      • Shinare
      • 4 years ago

      Make sure that tinfoil hat isn’t made in China… 🙂

        • krazyredboy
        • 4 years ago

        Oh… crap…

      • DrCR
      • 4 years ago

      It’s abstracted a step. NSA collects, and China hacks the NSA.

      [url=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=urglg3WimHA<]I'm protected cause I made this hat, from aluminum foil... foil...[/url<]

      • Chrispy_
      • 4 years ago

      Google, Apple and the NSA already have your fingerprints. It’s only logical to presume the Chinese government does too, since Snowden effectively confirmed that everyone is hacking everyone.

      Privacy is an illusion, we all signed that away a decade ago. Just accept it and enjoy the convenient features that your privacy bought.

        • vargis14
        • 4 years ago

        The only Fingerprints I have on record could possibly be a copy of my Birth Certificate….since I have never had to give my fingerprint for any reason, plus I never used it to input a electronic device.

        ‘Puts tinfoil on freshly roasted sweet peppers”

    • ronch
    • 4 years ago

    If the OnePlus phones are flagship killers, then I think these phones right here are flagship killers killers.

    Yes, they’re MediaTek, but I bet many pholks won’t care. They see the spec sheet and fork over some cash.

      • djayjp
      • 4 years ago

      What’s wrong with two A72 cores…?

        • ronch
        • 4 years ago

        it’s not just about CPU cores.

      • phileasfogg
      • 4 years ago

      >>>>> _They see the spec sheet and fork over some cash._
      I think you meant “phork” over some cash 😉

        • ronch
        • 4 years ago

        Oh yeah. Thanks, phriend.

      • Jigar
      • 4 years ago

      They have shifted to Snapdragons 650/652, Redmi Note 3 has 650 CPU.

        • ronch
        • 4 years ago

        I think many of the big names don’t rely on just one SoC supplier. Maintaining a relationship with two or more suppliers for critical components would be advisable. You know, kinda like how IBM wanted to have a second source for its x86 CPUs, which started all this Intel vs. AMD thing in the first place.

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