Here’s how to grab the Win10 Anniversary Update

As you've no doubt heard, the Windows 10 Anniversary Update is out. Well, sort of. Microsoft is rolling out the update slowly to all Windows 10 users, but if you'd rather not wait, Microsoft has a procedure for getting the update sooner. You can hit that link to see the full procedure, but we'll spoil it for you: tell Windows Update to check for updates. Your Windows 10 machine should find a "Feature update to Windows 10, version 1607" ready for download.

If, for whatever reason, that procedure doesn't work for you, Microsoft also has a tool that will download and install the update for you. According to our unscientific testing, the update itself should take around 20 minutes, but it might be longer on slower or older PCs. If you're still not sure if or why you want the Anniversary Update, check out some of our prior coverage on the new features the update is bringing to Windows 10. (Clocks on every taskbar!)

Comments closed
    • anotherengineer
    • 3 years ago

    So I’m guessing this is the guy then?

    [url<]https://msdn.microsoft.com/subscriptions/downloads/default.aspx#FileId=69857[/url<]

    • Ummagumma
    • 3 years ago

    When I read about all the different things that M$ changes during Windows 10 updates, and the stuff M$ decides “is best for you”, it makes me wonder about all the things I like about M$….

    [sound of crickets]

    • Meadows
    • 3 years ago

    The update took a very, very long time. It restarted several times. One of the restarts around 71% completion has failed without telling me, and I had to manually reset the PC to have it continue where it left off.

    Upon logging in again, Comodo Firewall broke without warning and there was no internet connection working through it. Disabling it, manually downloading the latest version, and installing it on top has worked.

    Most infuriatingly however, [b<]the anniversary update has reverted my default browser to Edge, re-enabled autorun on OneDrive when I already disabled that crap once before, and turned on some app related privacy settings again (including "occasional recommendations in the start menu"), [u<]without ever asking me about any of these things[/u<].[/b<] I abhor such assumptions and will want a dialogue box in the future. On the dimly bright side, after running Disk Cleanup and removing the safety backup of the previous version, my system partition got 10 GB more free space than before. This is especially impressive because updating to 10 from 8.1 already saved about as much once before.

    • Krogoth
    • 3 years ago

    I like it better when it was called “Service Packs”.

    Besides, a few minor UI tweaks. I don’t really see any difference between RTM and “Anniversary Edition”.

    • ludi
    • 3 years ago

    Two laptops upgraded so far, one mobile Sandy/HD3000 and one mobile Ivy/HD4000. Both went without a hitch, although it looks like the display brightness control bug in the HD3000 setup is still uncorrected.

    • ColeLT1
    • 3 years ago

    BSOD now has a QR code on it, didn’t have time to grab it though before I rebooted though.

    The update went smoothly this morning, but the blue screen while typing an email was not very reassuring.

    • wizardz
    • 3 years ago

    Microsoft..please..

    can you stop ****** changing the start menu? please?
    i cannot for the life of me understand why you do this.

    i swear to bacon….this is your last chance.

      • mkk
      • 3 years ago

      Yeah at least those changes could have been customizable. But no.
      I was happy to find that Startisback++ only needed to be reinstalled to work just fine with the anniversary update. Had expected some hassle there.

      • ldonyo
      • 3 years ago

      Amen! I used to be able to shut down without needing to see the screen using:

      Windows Key, Up Arrow, Up Arrow, Enter, Up Arrow, Up Arrow, Enter

      That’s gone, now I have to find a new key combo or make a macro to do it. Not cool, MS!

        • Ninjitsu
        • 3 years ago

        with win 7 it’s just win key, left arrow, enter.

          • psuedonymous
          • 3 years ago

          Win+X, U, U.
          It’s actually faster to sleep now: WIN+X, U, S, compared to Win, right, right, enter for Windows 7.

        • Goofus Maximus
        • 3 years ago

        I just hit the power button on the PC… πŸ˜‰

    • Bomber
    • 3 years ago

    I installed this on 3 desktops, 2 laptops, a Surface pro 2 and a Dell Venue 8. No major issues for the most part. The only one that gave me trouble was the Venue 8 32gb. Getting enough available storage was not easy. I had to remove the restore partition (useless as it’s win8 anyway) and the restore file. After install though, I had more free space than when I started so that is something. Rather surprised how easily the update went with the rest. Though all of them are Haswell or Haswell E. I still have to update my Westmere Xeon machine but I’m pretty sure that will go just as painless.

    • Kougar
    • 3 years ago

    Installed the update, resets my browser back to Edge.
    [list<] Chrome gives a popup asking if I want to make it the default browser, so I click yes. Windows auto-opens the default apps pane, with it still set to Edge. I click Edge and select Chrome Windows gives a popup asking me to try out Edge first anyway I click yes I'm absolutely fucking sure I want to switch to Chrome as my default browser All is well again. [/list<] Okay not really. All the default apps that require powershell commands to remove are reinstalled again. And F@H broke throwing OpenCL.dll not found errors just like with the Nov 1511 upgrade. Also the Windows 10 Upgrade assistant shortcut is still littering the desktop, the app has to be manually uninstalled even though it has no function post update. Looks like if apps are removed from the most used menu the action still cannot be undone.

      • Chrispy_
      • 3 years ago

      The new program associations “default app” issue is one Microsoft adamantly claims it is in our best interests since it makes it much harder for malware and crapware to steal file associations.

      Reality; Microsoft are being dicks and constantly steal all the associations you setup so that they can promote their inferior, invasive app instead. Seriously, I can’t be that hard to remember the app that was last given admin permission to be the default, can it?

      I’m not paranoid because I don’t have to be. Microsoft are BLATANTLY doing this and their veiled excuses for the reasons behind it are [i<]paper thin[/i<].

        • travbrad
        • 3 years ago

        YOU WILL OBEY

        • Kougar
        • 3 years ago

        Given how upset the EU got over integrating IE and Windows Media Player, I’m still puzzled why the EU apparently doesn’t care about these preinstalled apps that are not easy to remove, are reinstalled with every major update, and have multiple layers of nagging prompts when you attempt to remove them from default associations (such as Edge).

          • travbrad
          • 3 years ago

          The EU is a slow moving bureaucracy so maybe they just haven’t had enough time to notice it and address it yet? It took them about 10 years to take action about IE, and ironically by the time that case was settled IE was losing tons of market share (something that should have been impossible according to the EU)

        • sweatshopking
        • 3 years ago

        While i agree they should remember which apps were default, the new program association system is better

        • Ifalna
        • 3 years ago

        I wonder why my file associations didn’t get changed.

        I feel left out!

        • Goofus Maximus
        • 3 years ago

        It’s a bit of a joke there, since the main associations I had to re-reset were Windows Media Player in place of Groove Music and that TV thingie app

      • Voldenuit
      • 3 years ago

      [quote<]Installed the update, resets my browser back to Edge.[/quote<] Had the exact same thing happen, and thought to myself [i<]how convenient[/i<].

      • Shobai
      • 3 years ago

      The best part about all this is that Edge could be leaking users’ MS account credentials, as per [url=https://hackaday.com/2016/08/02/microsoft-live-account-credentials-leaking-from-windows-8-and-above/<]this 'feature'[/url<]

    • Goofus Maximus
    • 3 years ago

    Sigh. Yesterday was 12 hours of my life wasted. Why Microsoft, in it’s infinite wisdom, decided to suddenly make OneDrive the default for my Documents and Pictures folders in “This PC”, and permanently and undelete-ably pinned to the “Quick Access” menu, is beyond me, and annoys me to death.

    After “upgrading”, I had to repopulate my “pin to start” menu with all the pins I had done myself, and which the upgrade erased for no discernable reason, then I had to turn off all the new cortanatracking options in privacy and inking, deal with the “skype preview” and “get office” annoyances. Then I found out about the OneDrive switcharoo, which resisted all my efforts to switch back to local defaults, till I got desperate enough to try registry tweaking, which partly worked, but then ended with me logging in to an eternal circle of spinning dots, which attempts to recover failed miserably, and I ended up having to restore from a month old system image, and wondering where all my FREAKING FILE HISTORY BACKUPS WENT for my appdata folder. Kiss one month of thunderbird e-mail goodbye.

    Edit: Did I mention that I had to reset my background slideshow, since post-upgrade, it would do funky things after playing fullscreen games of any type, which only went away by restarting windows? fun…

    I’m now back up and running on the important parts, except for my missing e-mails, and not logged into OneDrive, and I’m not looking forward to the next round of having to deal with this. Add worries about the next overnight batch of potential woop-arse torrential rain threatening to glue me to the shopvac, and I have not been a happy camper at all for the last 24 hours…

      • Ifalna
      • 3 years ago

      Ouch, those are some mean bugs.
      I use Onedrive too but it behaved completely normally for me pre and post update.

      I’d never rely on version histories for backups though. Teach your TB to place it’s archives somewhere else than on your system partition. Mine save them onto a completely different physical drive.

      In general: set up your system in a way that you can erase your complete system partition/drive w/o losing ANY personal data at all.
      Then upgrades like this will be a lot less scary.
      If bugs happen -> clean install and be done with it, instead of tinkering for hours only to end up with an unreliable solution.

        • Goofus Maximus
        • 3 years ago

        Yes. I’m going to stop using file history at all, and just use system images, from here on out.

        Edit: I changed my mind. I will still use it, but in a much more limited fashion, for stuff that changes frequently, or that I absolutely don’t want to lose. And I’ve stuck the thunderbird profile folder specifically in to be backed up, this time.

        I wish Thunderbird had a synch option similar to the one in Firefox. I love that feature to death…

          • BobbinThreadbare
          • 3 years ago

          I’ve had major problems with filehistory just eating up all available harddrive space. I stick with Windows 7 backups.

            • Goofus Maximus
            • 3 years ago

            It does seem to be wonky in it’s behavior. I think it backs up the entire “insert-your-profile-folder-name-here” folder by default, at least the first time, even when you’ve not added to (or removed from” the “include folders” list. So I now have a huge “exclude folders” list. Since I’ve taken to installing old games like Quake and Unreal to this folder to save myself the admin privileges hassle, this can result in a whopping huge chunk of data.

            Since I went straight from my old AlthonXP (pre-SSE2) Windows XP machine straight to Windows 8.1, I’ve never used the Windows 7 Backup utility.

            Another option I’m seriously considering is just using system images, and changing the folder name of the previous system image folder before making the next. With the backup copy, you can do all sort of disk management rigamarole to de-bootify the VHD so you can mount the previous image as a VHD drive, and just browse it as if it were any old HDD.

      • Goofus Maximus
      • 3 years ago

      UPDATE: I found my initial problem, which was something I didn’t even know OneDrive and Windows 8.1/10 had done.

      When I allowed file explorer to “view libraries” and check the folders associated with the libraries, the “Pictures” and “Documents” folders were pointed to the onedrive versions without my even knowing that it had done so at one point.

      I learned the complicated rigamarole to fix this. First, I right-clicked the “onedrive” icon in the system tray, and picked “settings”, where I unsynched all the folders. When closing/applying these settings, windows tells me to keep the documents and pictures folders synched or some features won’t work. I tell it … well after the blue-streak, I tell it NO! Then I close down and restart. Then I go back to the library view, open the document and pictures library trees in the navigation pane, and right-click the “Documents” folder, pick the “Location” tab, and tell it to set to default, which will be the original local documents folder. I do the same for the Pictures folder. Restart. (safety first)

      Now I go back to onedrive settings, and tell it to unlink all folders. Onedrive will then have me sign in, and walks me through the process of basically relinking/synching the onedrive folders. restart.

      At this point, I’ve got my onedrive in file explorer, and my defaults set back to local. So this time, when I’m attacked by the anniversary update, that’s ONE surprise that won’t bite me! I can deal with the rest of the stupid stuff it did.

      Ya gotta love finding out that Windows did stuff that you didn’t even know about, till it bites you in the… back sometime way down the road…

        • Goofus Maximus
        • 3 years ago

        Success. Upgrade occured again, and I only had to deal with the unpinned start items and desktop slideshow bugs, as well as trimming privacy settings, turning off a bunch of “run in the background” switches for apps (Candy Crush? Really?), and uninstalling “Get Office” and “Skype Preview” notification-ware. File Explorer turned out nice and proper this time.

    • Neutronbeam
    • 3 years ago

    “(Clocks on every taskbar!)” Well, a clock IS the modern first anniversary gift so that seems very appropriate.

    • Roscoe
    • 3 years ago

    I need to re-install Windows 10 Pro on my daughter’s PC, is this Anniversary edition available as an ISO yet? And will it have all the cumulative updates included?

      • Rza79
      • 3 years ago

      Yes, use the media creation tool.

        • Roscoe
        • 3 years ago

        Thanks, yes it’s in the MSDN downloads

          • GTVic
          • 3 years ago

          Or you can just install the update and then do a full reset.

    • Ninjitsu
    • 3 years ago

    In Soviet Russia, Windows 10 Anniversary Update grabs you!

    oh wait…

    • Slartibartfast
    • 3 years ago

    Finally a use for MS Edge (besides the new use of extensions that it should of had in the first place) and it’s the up to 8K hardware accelerated VP9 video streaming via a Nvidia Pascal GPU or the AMD equivalent.
    [url<]https://blogs.windows.com/msedgedev/2016/04/18/webm-vp9-and-opus-support-in-microsoft-edge/[/url<] Chrome and Firefox don't support this as the CPU reaches 45% at 4K and 100% at 8K* (with stuttering) but with Edge my CPU usage is only at 3% [url<]https://youtu.be/QPdWJeybMo8[/url<] It's just a shame about the now forced adware Start Screen of the Anniversary Update though, which this time you can't disable, it's not showing anything right now but give them time.

      • biffzinker
      • 3 years ago

      I’ve yet to see any ads using a [b<]third party start menu/start screen[/b<] replacement (Startisback++.) I did see a new Appx package called "Microsoft.Advertising.Xaml_10.0.1605.0_x64__8wekyb3d8bbwe" so it's only a matter of time until.

      • Rza79
      • 3 years ago

      Use Classic Shell

        • Ninjitsu
        • 3 years ago

        WARNING: [url<]https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=12215449[/url<]

          • Rza79
          • 3 years ago

          Fixed already

      • Rza79
      • 3 years ago

      Tested that 8K video. Around 50-60% CPU load with a Xeon 5650 & Radeon 7950.
      Both in Chrome 53 and Firefox 48.

    • CuttinHobo
    • 3 years ago

    Just installed it and – as expected – they didn’t skip the opportunity to try to reinstate their programs as defaults, as well as make you op-out of the telemetry options during setup. Again.

      • EzioAs
      • 3 years ago

      I don’t have the reset default programs issue you mentioned about on my desktop and laptop.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 3 years ago

        Same here. Upgraded three systems. Defaults like Chrome were still set and all three systems log in with MS accounts so it’s not like it couldn’t be set stealthily if MS wanted to.

          • CuttinHobo
          • 3 years ago

          It didn’t try to switch your browser to Edge, music to Groove, etc. while in the setup environment? Right around the time you needed to re-toggle the telemetry settings?

            • Noinoi
            • 3 years ago

            Personal experience from upgrading my desktop:

            No prompts at all. Seriously.

            As soon as you let Windows Update restart the computer, everything is in autopilot, until you end up on the sign-in screen again. I entered my password there again, and after a brief intro stuff that’s been there forever if you’ve ever done a new Windows install since 8.0, it just kept going until I hit my usual desktop, full of startup apps opening up (I run a lot of chat programs).

            I use Edge anyway, so that doesn’t really matter, but my previous associations with Adobe Reader, Photo Gallery, and Windows Media Player stayed.

            If it does something else, I’d reckon something is probably going on… seems like an atypical experience.

            • EzioAs
            • 3 years ago

            I have seen people on TechPowerUp forums who claims that the behaviour CuttinHobo mentioned happened to them as well. It might not be as atypical as you’d think.

            • EndlessWaves
            • 3 years ago

            Bugs rarely affect just one person.

            • Goofus Maximus
            • 3 years ago

            This is sort of how it worked for me on my desktop, with the proviso that, after it was done, it had deleted all items I had pinned to Start myself, for no reason that I could find at all, and it really annoyingly switched the “Documents” and “Pictures” folders under “This PC” from their original local folders, to the freaking OneDrive folders, and made it impossible to switch back.

            I posted my travails so I won’t go over it again, though I’m steamed enough to rant about it all over again!

            • CuttinHobo
            • 3 years ago

            No prompts at all? Did it even enter the Windows setup environment for you, or did it just install, reboot and send you on your way?

            It sounds like my update was more major than what other people experienced. I saw it mention that it was upgrading from W10 build 10,xxx up to 14,xxx. The large jump in build number caught my eye but it’s really not something I’ve been paying attention to, so that may or may not be as old as it seems. I’m guessing other people are on more recent builds so maybe their setup process is simpler.

            • ludi
            • 3 years ago

            Sounds like you got very nearly the “Reset my PC” treatment. Did you skip over a couple major updates prior to this one, by any chance?

            • Noinoi
            • 3 years ago

            Both of my computers were never in any insider builds – they’ve always been running on official releases, kept up-to-date. I’d suspect that the normal builds are probably the most well-tested upgrade paths that make it as quiet as possible.

            • Ifalna
            • 3 years ago

            Nope, no prompts at all until the Login screen reappeared.

            Now that you mention it, I think music was set to “groove” but I’m not certain which application was tied to it before the update, since I almost never open music files via double click.
            (I use Foobar and it has it’s own library)

        • Kougar
        • 3 years ago

        On my main desktop my default browser was unchanged. On a second desktop the default browser was reverted to Edge. The only difference I know of between them was that I had removed Edge from that other system to minimize the install as much as possible., but it was reinstalled along with all the other crappy default apps I had nuked.

      • ColeLT1
      • 3 years ago

      Mine only re-pinned the windows store icon to the taskbar.

      • Ifalna
      • 3 years ago

      Nope, not here. Everything has been successful and I didn’t see any telemetry options. Checked them anyway and all that should be off is off.

      So it was probably a glitch not an intention.

      Personally I’m surprised these “upgrades” which are more on a scale of “OS reinstallation” work this smoothly at all. Quite a feat if you ask me.

    • chΒ΅ck
    • 3 years ago

    The only interesting thing in the update is the new dark theme setting.
    Maybe the GNU bash shell… if you’re into that.

      • trackerben
      • 3 years ago

      I’m going dark – my eyes see better in the blackness

      • kuraegomon
      • 3 years ago

      You’d damned well better believe I’m into that! πŸ˜€

      • Voldenuit
      • 3 years ago

      Clock on secondary taskbar is long overdue.

      I use bash at work, so it’s nice to have, but I realized that I don’t ever use it at home, nor am I a fan of linux command line shells in general, so it’s not really a deciding factor for me.

      I [i<]really[/i<] don't like the All Programs explosion in the start menu, and the hamburger slide out menu is just a travesty of wasted space.

    • south side sammy
    • 3 years ago

    My God man, when will it end? Please, just go away already!

      • torquer
      • 3 years ago

      I bet you hear that a lot

    • SixIron
    • 3 years ago

    The check for updates in Settings wasn’t doing squat but the Update Assistant is working nicely so far, 55% downloaded in less than 5 minutes.

      • SixIron
      • 3 years ago

      And mine is done. Took about 35 minutes, start to finish.

    • sweatshopking
    • 3 years ago

    I’ll install tomorrow morning.

      • anotherengineer
      • 3 years ago

      On your 14.4 dial up in Africa?

    • blahsaysblah
    • 3 years ago

    You have to change registry manually or use group policy editor(Pro and above) to turn off Cortana/web search and get a plain system search box. sigh…

    [url=http://www.howtogeek.com/265027/how-to-disable-cortana-in-windows-10/<]How to disable Cortana[/url<] Got pretty mad :), i'd forgotten this is how i turned it off in my Windows Insider VM when they first made this change.

      • Vaughn
      • 3 years ago

      Thanks for this.

      i just did the upgrade wasn’t to bad speed wise.

      • dyrdak
      • 3 years ago

      I’ve taken ownership, backed up and locked all policy registry keys so only my user can make changes to these (“trusted” installer, system and admin group are out, also my system is set to, well, remote region where Cortana does not venture for now;). I’ll see how this works out for the upgrade (really no rush, let other get burned 1st). There’s really nothing I care in 10 (or Windows) any more – really a compromised system I can’t trust and I’m getting fed up with the hide and seek game played by MS. Currently I’m looking up wubi options for my tablet (surely they made it difficult to boot of something more trustworthy).

      • tanker27
      • 3 years ago

      To the top with you!

      • trackerben
      • 3 years ago

      I refused Cortana “for now” during the update screens, and she won’t!

      • bronek
      • 3 years ago

      I wonder if [url=http://www.howtogeek.com/225973/how-to-disable-onedrive-and-remove-it-from-file-explorer-on-windows-10/<]How to Disable OneDrive and Remove It From File Explorer on Windows 10[/url<] still works with anniversary edition, anyone tried?

        • tanker27
        • 3 years ago

        I haven’t tried. But I gave OneDrive a chance a few months ago; and you know what, its quite handy. /shrug

          • w76
          • 3 years ago

          I don’t know if they still use completely separate code bases or not, but we have sync issues fairly routinely in the office (we’re corporate Office365 users). It also silently re-enabled auto-upload of photos on my android phone too recently, destroying my trust, thus forcing me to banish it from my phone.

          Those won’t be issues for everyone, but I just see it as spyware — for the moment.

          Edit: To add color to this, I’ve been a long time SpiderOak subscriber, so obviously I care about certain things other than ultra-deep OS integration.

          • localhostrulez
          • 3 years ago

          Meh, I usually remove it from startup (in Task Manager), and forget it exists. Only problem with mom’s machine is I wasn’t sure if she used it – if I disable it via startup and/or group policy she’s never going to find it when she wants it; if I leave it enabled, it wastes resources starting even if it’s not needed (although I don’t care about this nearly as much with an SSD). Would’ve just left it uninstalled and let her add it if needed before.

          Couldn’t they have it in the OS, but you have to open it first before it tacks itself onto startup?

      • Kougar
      • 3 years ago

      That’s odd. I had Cortana/web search disabled pre-update, and the web search remained disabled post update.

      Thanks for the link, used it to nuke Cortana πŸ™‚

    • mkk
    • 3 years ago

    You go first, I’ve got your back. Promise.

      • torquer
      • 3 years ago

      Seriously, how often do Windows updates cause serious issues for the average user?

        • yogibbear
        • 3 years ago

        Those users were found tragically suffering from a case of suicide by gunshot wound to the back of the head.

        • mkk
        • 3 years ago

        I work in retail, and would say quite a bit too often. But perhaps the biggest problem is how updates like these are started without the user being informed of the ramifications. It could easily bar him/her from doing a days work on an oldish/budget laptop, while the operating system gets a complete overhaul.

        But for my own sake i jested, updating my main home system right away to have an early look at the process. I hope not too many are greeted with a black screen instead of the login like I was, but still even such occurrences is probably not the biggest problem with Windows update in recent years.

    • smilingcrow
    • 3 years ago

    Who’s in a rush to download an update that removes features that have been in the Pro version for a year now?
    A sad indictment of the state of modern Operating Systems.

      • blahsaysblah
      • 3 years ago

      Clean install of Windows now uses only 6.5GB. I guess they removed some of the fat too.

      • Ari Atari
      • 3 years ago

      From what I understand, it’s not really the removal of features, it’s the removal of the ability to remove some features. I know what I’m going to lose by upgrading, but I also know that I’ll have no choice in the matter eventually, so I might as well get it over with.

      I tried Kubuntu 16.04 for a month so far and it basically does everything I’d ever want it to, ignoring the obvious bugs, but I somewhat broke my graphics cards by overvolting them and they aren’t stable at stock clocks and voltages anymore. As far as I can tell, the only way to overvolt in Linux is to flash the BIOS and I don’t really trust myself with that. Linux with the 4770k’s HD4600 is ok… if I never open a game.

        • smilingcrow
        • 3 years ago

        The ability to control updates and adjust Group Policy settings etc is a feature in itself.

          • Ari Atari
          • 3 years ago

          Eh, it just seemed like one of those moments where you could screw with English and just say the same word over and over and have it make sense. Sorry about that, semantics arguing has been plaguing me lately.

          The terrorist Terrorist’s terror wristband band banded together over the recent injustice. =p

      • Ifalna
      • 3 years ago

      As a normal consumer, these options didn’t concern me.

      Cortana is nuked via Classic shell which searches locally only.
      I always update when Windows wants to and it still asks me when it is allowed to restart, so no problem there either.

      Anything else I should care about as a “normal user”?

        • smilingcrow
        • 3 years ago

        Have you heard the latest Radio ad for Windows 10?

        “Windows 10 Home – For the normal person in your life. Comes with a free tube of lube.

          • Krogoth
          • 3 years ago

          [url<]https://www.penny-arcade.com/comic/2002/07/22[/url<] Never gets old

            • UberGerbil
            • 3 years ago

            Knew what that was without even clicking the link. And I agree.

            • Meadows
            • 3 years ago

            Except how is it relevant here?

          • Ifalna
          • 3 years ago

          I’m sorry I do not listen to radio. Nor do I watch TV.

          Don’t get me wrong: the removal of options/user control is always a lame move and I do think MS should be chastised for it.

          It’s just that THESE specific options were of no concern to me, and I feel that people overly dramatize it.

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This