Thermaltake Toughpower SFX PSUs put big power in little boxes

The market for SFX power supplies has been steadily growing as more and more users turn an eye toward small-form-factor PCs, but there still aren't many high-quality models on the market. Aside from a couple of units from Corsair and Silverstone, builders are pretty much stuck looking at the unofficial "Micro ATX" power supply category. That's why Thermaltake's announcement (late last week) of two new 80 PLUS Gold-certified SFX power supplies is big news.

The new power supplies, the Toughpower STP-0450F-G and STP-0600F-G, are both high-efficiency fully-modular SFX power supplies with maximum continuous capacity of 450W and 600W, respectively. The Gold certification means that the power supplies have to be 90% efficient at 50% load, and the power connector allotment—three SATA power connectors, two Molex power connectors, and a floppy power connector—should suffice for its intended use in SFF PCs. These new power supplies use flat cabling, too, which should help with airflow in tight spaces.

Thermaltake includes an EPS12V (4+4-pin) CPU power connector on these power supplies, as well, and if we're reading the specifications correctly, even the 450W model includes a pair of 6+2-pin PCI Express power cables. With a relatively low-power build otherwise, that means a dedicated builder could use one of these to stuff even a mighty Titan X into a tiny little case. SFX power supplies are smaller than the ATX power supplies almost every case expects, and Thermaltake helpfully includes an adapter bracket so that these units can be installed in ATX cases, as well. Thermaltake also warranties the units for seven years.

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    • psuedonymous
    • 3 years ago

    These appear to be externally and internally identical to the Silverstone SFX units built by Enhance (the ST45SF-G and SX600-G).

    • blahsaysblah
    • 3 years ago

    I bought a Corsair SF450 PS a while back and am happy with it. However, i might have bought this instead:

    For modders, it has straight forward 24pin ATX port(Corsair uses 10pin+18pin so they can have simpler PCB design, … you have to double up/crimp two wires in a couple of places).

    And possibly since the PCI-E connection is in totally different location, it might also have the five ground and three 12v pins, but not as big a deal since its the sense pins that Corsair had you double up so you could plug CPU/PCI-E into any of the three ports.

    Have to be a little more careful in pin and wire selection since the PCI-E power is across one port but should not be too hard.

    Lastly, i always say it. The [url=https://www.amazon.com/SilverStone-Technology-Universal-Bracket-RL-PP08B/dp/B01BYB33J8/<]Silverstone RL-PP08B SFX to ATX bracket[/url<] is the best. It has vents and is not centered vertically so you can use it to add the maximum amount of CPU cooler height in cases where PSU is above CPU. edit: taking closer look, even the 600W only has one PCI-E port so for modders have to be extra picky. Also, personally, i really like the power switch on PS. So thats a negative for these units. On other hand no switch, easier ventilation.

    • Chrispy_
    • 3 years ago

    SFX definitely needs more love. Normally I’m pretty wary about Tt power supplies but these are both Gold certified (so have to be decent inside) and the OEM looks like the same one EVGA and Silverstone use.

    • PenGun
    • 3 years ago

    One thing has not changed in a long time. Just buy the Seasonic that fits your needs.

      • DragonDaddyBear
      • 3 years ago

      Do they make an SFX power supply? It’s a fairly limited number of manufactures at this point.
      I wonder who is the company behind this rebrand.

        • Voldenuit
        • 3 years ago

        [quote<]I wonder who is the company behind this rebrand.[/quote<] Anandtech has internal shots: [url<]http://www.anandtech.com/show/10535/thermaltake-introduces-450w-600w-toughpower-sfx-power-supplies[/url<]. It looks identical to the [url=http://www.jonnyguru.com/modules.php?name=NDReviews&op=Story5&reid=395<]Silverstone SX600[/url<], which were built by Enhance. Should be good.

      • BoilerGamer
      • 3 years ago

      EVGA’s SuperNova G2/P2/T2 line with Superflower Leadex Units have been acing JohnnyGuru’s reviews for a couple years now and their pricing is equal or better than Seasonic and have 10 yr warranty. Even TR have been recommending them over Seasonic in System guides.

        • Voldenuit
        • 3 years ago

        Yeah, the G2 models are nice. I was looking at them recently, but ended up going with a Sea X650 because:
        1. I didn’t like the fan grille cutout on the evgas (although in real life this would be unlikely to make any difference)
        2. I wanted rounded 24-pin cable and flat sata cables; everyone else does one or the other
        3. You can’t really go wrong with a Seasonic X series (well, okay, some weird compatibility problems with some Skylake systems*, but that’s come up on various other PSUs as well)

        I would not hesitate to recommend an evga G2 to anyone, however.

        * EDIT: My memory fails me, it was with Haswell, and Seasonic has fixed the issue since with revisions.

    • EndlessWaves
    • 3 years ago

    An unfortunate opening to the news article given that this appears to be an identical unit to Silverstone’s ST45SF-G/SX600-G

    Although a quick scan suggests that they are at least including slightly a slightly different set of cables. Including two 6+2 pin cables for the 450W instead of 6+2 & 6, and dropping one of the 4 SATA connectors from the 600W.

    • tay
    • 3 years ago

    Wow SFX. Let’s hope this form factor finally takes off.

    • Sargent Duck
    • 3 years ago

    Are you sure you didn’t leave a “0” off that 450 watt?

    You mean that an actual brand name company is making a gold efficiency power supply that most people use (450-550 watts) and NOT what they want us to buy? (800 – 1200watts)

    Today is a good day.

      • paulsz28
      • 3 years ago

      In TR’s GTX 1080 Overclock review, total system draw under load is just 280W. Doesn’t seem possible, right? That’s how far total system power efficiency has come in 10 years. I remember a 600W PSU being midgrade 10 years ago. Of course, that low power draw is with contemporary components. Add in an old CPU or GPU and your draw jumps.

        • EndlessWaves
        • 3 years ago

        The situation wasn’t how you remember it.

        Ten years ago the mid-range cards like the X1600 and 7600GT were drawing 35W while the high end X1900 XT and 7900 GT were pulling around 80-100W.

        This TR test from September 2006 of the 7900GT with a Core 2 Extreme Edition has a system power consumption of 225W while gaming and much more of that would have been attributable to other components: [url<]https://techreport.com/review/10758/connect3d-radeon-x1900-gt-graphics-card/9[/url<] Today's 120W GTX 1060 and 165W GTX 1080 use more power when compared with ten years ago. And ten years ago they'd been ramping up the power. A few years before that in the 9700pro era a high end card would use 50W or less. Power is arbitrary anyway. The only reason today's cards are all 100W+ monsters is because it was a relatively easy way to increase performance. If AMD and nVidia had kept GPUs sub-50W then we'd have less performance but we wouldn't notice it because our yardsticks were different. It's not very environmentally responsible to be so unneedfully wasteful of power but as a gamer it's difficult to do anything about it directly. All we can do is pester developers to make games run well on low power (entry level/integrated) GPU so it's unnecessary to buy one that uses a lot of power. AMD and nVidia will soon adapt and as a side bonus we'd finally get usable gaming laptops.

          • Chrispy_
          • 3 years ago

          Damn straight.

          Check out [url=http://img.tomshardware.com/us/2002/11/04/pixel/sapphire3.jpg<]this phenomenal heatsink[/url<] on my old Radeon 9700 Pro. It was one of the most expensive cards I'd ever purchased! I don't know how many watts the 9700 Pro actually drew, but based on that heatsink being both adequate and quiet, I will assume it's somewhere under 25 Watts.

          • Voldenuit
          • 3 years ago

          [quote<]It's not very environmentally responsible to be so unneedfully wasteful of power but as a gamer it's difficult to do anything about it directly[/quote<] Modern cards use less at idle than they used to. If you're concerned about power usage, you can always downvolt/downclock/frame-cap/reduce settings, although I'd be fairly certain that there are many more opportunities to save power in the rest of your daily life (heating, insulation, appliances, commute, etc) than your GPU.

            • EndlessWaves
            • 3 years ago

            That’s just fiddling around the edges.

            When you can play a first person shooter on a mobile device running on 2.8W, the idea that there’d be a mainstream market using a hundred times as much power to run a slightly fancier version is something you’d never get anyone to believe if it wasn’t reality.

          • ImSpartacus
          • 3 years ago

          Yeah, that’s probably why we don’t have single slot coolers anymore.

          What was the last single slot cooler on a meaningfully powerful reference card? The 8800 GT? It had a 100W TDP.

          Today, our only cards that go under 100W usually go all the way to 75W so they can forgo external power connectors. So you’ve got one <100W card in your entire lineup (maybe 2) and it’s just not worth the engineering effort to build a single slot cooler for one card when all of the gaming cases/mobos are built to handle dual slot coolers.

      • slowriot
      • 3 years ago

      Huh? Silverstone, Fractal Design and Corsair just to name some all have had SFX PSUs with these similar ratings for a couple years now. And it’s not like any of the name brands in PSUs in general ever stopped making the 300W to 600W units. And they offer all of those in the various 80Plus ratings.

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