Samsung is now stacking V-NAND 64 layers high

Samsung is dropping the mic at the Flash Memory Summit in Santa Clara. The company has taken a page from Gillette's handbook (in a good way) and announced an upgrade to its V-NAND (Vertical NAND) technology. The company is now stacking flash memory 64 layers high, another density increase over the 48-layer V-NAND we just tested in Samsung's Portable SSD T3.

The new V-NAND chips serve up 512Gb (64GB) of storage per die, and a single die can now move data at 100 MB/s. Samsung expects to offer products based on the new technology in the fourth quarter of 2016, and believes it will be producing 100TB SSDs come 2020. The company is already planning to use the new V-NAND chips for a 32TB (yes, terabytes) enterprise SSD that sandwiches 32 layers of 1TB storage into a 2.5" SAS drive, which will be available next year.

Most enthusiasts' wallets can't quite stretch to behemoth enterprise drives, but there's still hope for us mere mortals. Samsung also announced a new lineup of solid-state drives called the "Z-SSD,"  built around a "unique circuit design and controller." The new units are claimed to have four times less latency and 1.6 times the sequential read speeds of the already-speedy Samsung PM963 NVMe SSD. Expect the Z-SSDs in stores sometime next year.

Comments closed
    • Wirko
    • 3 years ago

    If anyone has the experience, it’s Samsung.

    [url<]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burj_Khalifa[/url<] [quote<] The primary contractor was Samsung C&T of South Korea. [/quote<] [quote<] Floor count: 154 usable floors plus 9 maintenance levels, 46 spire levels, and 2 below-ground parking levels [/quote<] and they can also do microchannel chip cooling the right way because [quote<] World's second highest swimming pool: 76th floor [/quote<] not to mention that the SSDs will be most suitable to store things people usually store because [quote<] World's highest nightclub: 144th floor [/quote<]

    • hasseb64
    • 3 years ago

    So?
    Who will need streaming in the future when you carry everything of importance on you?

    • ronch
    • 3 years ago

    I’ve begun to think of these SSDs like they’re USB thumb drives. Some are better than others, as is the case with everything, but heck, I’m not gonna fuss over some minor spec differences. Grab one from your favorite brand, plug it in, and forget about it.

    • davidbowser
    • 3 years ago

    This is great news. Consumer grade SSDs in the 4-8TB range look very much within reach in the next year or two.

      • Firestarter
      • 3 years ago

      the 4TB 850 EVO is a consumer grade SSD available right now

        • James296
        • 3 years ago

        how affordable 4TB+ SSDs?

          • Firestarter
          • 3 years ago

          They’re not cheap, but the cost per GB is in the same ballpark as 1TB drives

            • ImSpartacus
            • 3 years ago

            You know that 1TB ssds are where the best cost/gb ratios are, right? The new >1TB are all quite costly, unlike most TB drives.

    • Srsly_Bro
    • 3 years ago

    Seagate is planning to release a 60 TB SAS SSD for enterprise next year.

      • just brew it!
      • 3 years ago

      Yup. And it’ll probably cost as much as a new car.

        • Waco
        • 3 years ago

        I thought they said street price would be under $12k? The release said “cheaper than anything available today”, which would put it at maximum with $.20/GB being the current bar.

          • just brew it!
          • 3 years ago

          OK… a recent-model used car. 😉

    • albundy
    • 3 years ago

    I’ve been using HDD platters as coasters and as metal placeholders to reinforce stuff that’s screwed on. cant do that with an SSD!

      • just brew it!
      • 3 years ago

      I’ve got all sorts of dead HDDs sitting in boxes. I think I need to harvest me some coasters!

    • f0d
    • 3 years ago

    [quote<]Samsung also announced a new lineup of solid-state drives called the "Z-SSD," built around a "unique circuit design and controller." The new units are claimed to have four times less latency and 1.6 times the sequential read speeds of the already-speedy Samsung PM963 NVMe SSD[/quote<] i dont want faster drives as they dont seem to make any difference in loading the things i care about (OS+games) [url<]https://techreport.com/review/30196/toshiba-ocz-rd400-512gb-ssd-reviewed/5[/url<] just give me those massive capacity SSD's so i can get rid of all these unreliable HDD's

      • just brew it!
      • 3 years ago

      As densities go up on SSDs, reliability will probably go down. For stationary applications (where mechanical shock does not come into play) I expect we’ll see some convergence in terms of reliability. Mechanical HDDs are amazingly reliable, given that they are rather complex mechanical devices; that’s what happens when you have a technology that is very mature, with decades of experience behind it.

        • RAGEPRO
        • 3 years ago

        Yeah. People don’t realize the incredible engineering at work in a hard disk drive. There’s the old 747 analogy, but, well, [url=http://geekscomputer.blogspot.si/2008/07/hard-disk-drive-analogy.html<]read this when you got a few minutes[/url<] and tell me you aren't smirking.

          • just brew it!
          • 3 years ago

          …and that analogy is based on a HDD that is over a decade old at this point. HDD densities have increased by TWO ORDERS of magnitude since then!

          • Jason181
          • 3 years ago

          Isn’t that based on the famous IBM Deathstars, or am I mistaken?

        • flip-mode
        • 3 years ago

        I think density<–>reliability issues are not yet really known, right? And I imagine firmware could play a very large role in reliability. With drive sizes exploding, I would think a lot more capacity could go to ensuring reliability as well.

        And I thought SSDs were already more reliable than HDDs – at least until an SSD approaches its endurance limit.

        • maxxcool
        • 3 years ago

        Yup. Give me CHEAPER (.10 per gig) so I can raid-6 / raid-10 or UnRaid 10 or so if them.

      • Krogoth
      • 3 years ago

      SSD media isn’t exactly that more reliable then most HDDs. In terms of reliability, the only real advantage is that solid-state media is much more resistant to physical stress then the old spinners (making them ideal for tablets/laptops). SSD media has its own nest of issues as countless OCZ and Samsung users found out the hard way.

        • f0d
        • 3 years ago

        [quote<]as countless OCZ and Samsung users found out the hard way.[/quote<] i must be the luckiest man in the world as i have what is probably considered the worst drives yet they work just fine for me (old sandforce vertex2 60gb and an 840evo 250gb) not saying the issues diddnt exist as i too have read about all the failures of sandforce drives and the slowdowns of the 840 - i was just the luckiest man in the world to avoid having the issues and they are still running just fine for me the ocz has been on almost 24hours a day non stop since i bought it (in my htpc as main boot drive) yet i have had so many hdd's fail on me its starting to not be so funny anymore, admittedly i run WAY more hdd's than ssd's (14 combined in my main pc and HTPC combined) but having 5 hdd complete failures since 2010 is just getting annoying now

          • maxxcool
          • 3 years ago

          I had 2 60gb Vertexes in my way back machine HTPC. One went to sleep and never woke up. (common firmware issue back then). The other one still work to this day as the OS drive.

          They are kind of like Ford Escorts. It ran. Or it exploded.

        • flip-mode
        • 3 years ago

        Tell it to my Seagate 3 TB spinners – 7 of 12 died in 3 years.

          • Waco
          • 3 years ago

          Anecdotes. :shrug:

          With rare exception (entire model lines with a flaw), HDDs are reasonably reliable. There are bad batches here and there, but that happens with anything.

          • Krogoth
          • 3 years ago

          Unfortunately, that’s the life expectancy of most customer-tier HDDs. Q&A has fallen due to constant pressure to keep TiB/$$$ ratio as low as possible to starve off SSD media.

          Customer-tier SSD media isn’t really that better with their stupid firmware bugs and issues.

          Ironic, that the most robust and reliable customer-tier media for archival use is optical (assuming that you take care of your discs).

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