Liqid and Kingston build a 2.5″ SSD with 3.6 GB/s speed

Intriguing news keeps coming from this year's Flash Memory Summit. Yesterday, Samsung announced 64-layer V-NAND. Today, Kingston and industry newcomer Liqid announced that they've collaborated to make what they call the world's fastest 2.5" solid-state drive.

Now, we're used to hearing inflated claims in these parts, and always try to maintain our wait-till-we-bench-it attitude. Still, it's hard not to be impressed with the numbers that Liqid and Kingston are reporting. They're reporting sequential read and write speeds of 3.6 gigabytes per second. For reference, two short months ago we happily recommended an SSD that measures its speed in mere hundreds of megabytes per second. For random read and write speeds, the companies report results that are also an order of magnitude higher than many products currently on the market. Random reads for their drive reportedly reach 850K IOPS.

Liqid and Kingston have apparently reached this level of performance by packaging four M.2 SSDs inside a 2.5" drive chassis and ganging them together with multiple Phison PS5007-E7 PCIe NVMe controllers. This approach will allow the companies to sell drives with up to 3.9 TB of capacity.

While the companies haven't offered specifics about models, release dates, and pricing, they do expect the drive to be generally available later this year. We'll look forward to seeing some real-world benchmarks of this product.

Comments closed
    • Lord.Blue
    • 3 years ago

    Wouldn’t the U.2 ports work better? I guess you’d have to run it through a PCIEx16 in that case…

    • Krogoth
    • 3 years ago

    Shame that such a drive is bloody overkill for I/O needs for most workloads and users.

    • brucethemoose
    • 3 years ago

    So… It’s RAID in a box?

    That’s nothing new.

    • ImSpartacus
    • 3 years ago

    Is that a 15mm drive? So this is geared towards servers and stuff?

    • CScottG
    • 3 years ago

    A persistent cache/cash drive.

    • Anovoca
    • 3 years ago

    4k video (on PLEX) is getting increasingly more practical and faster than I had hoped. Still waiting for a 4k burner though.

      • Waco
      • 3 years ago

      You need nothing close to this for 4K video serving. A single HDD is fine…

        • Anovoca
        • 3 years ago

        if you compress the hell out of it.

          • Waco
          • 3 years ago

          If you’re using PLEX to stream uncompressed 4K video…you’re doing it wrong. Still, it’s only 350-700 MB/s, so you don’t need this to stream it uncompressed at 60 FPS either.

          • RAGEPRO
          • 3 years ago

          You don’t even have to compress it that much. [url=http://forum.doom9.org/showthread.php?t=172064<]50 megabit HEVC will look good for 4K video at 60 FPS[/url<] assuming it isn't a pathological case. As I'm sure you're aware, that's only 6.25MB/sec. If you have even a slightly older mechanical HDD that won't do 6.25MB/sec, you probably should upgrade. πŸ™‚ [i<]edit:[/i<] That same link also suggests that lossless compression of 4K video (again, at 60 FPS) might be do-able around 200-250MB/sec, which the latest hard drives can handle. Surely a small RAID could, or a single SATA SSD. And if you're doing movies, or other sub-60 FPS content, it gets even easier.

            • thor84no
            • 3 years ago

            If I’m going 4K I think I’d go for lossless compression wherever possible. Sure, it isn’t necessary, but neither is 4K. Add to that that if I was watching a 4K stream from my Plex server, there’s a good chance someone else might watch one simultaneously… I sure wouldn’t mind having some overhead available on read speeds. My NAS would probably still hold up since it’s a 5 disk raid though.

            • brucethemoose
            • 3 years ago

            How? Why?

            Unless you work at a movie studio or something, there’s no way to get native, lossless 4k copies of TV/Movies, not even illegally. Even Blu Rays are highly compressed.

            I guess you could record raw 4k video with a crazy setup then compress it later, but I’ve never seen anyone do it.

            FYI moderate levels of compression look fine, even if you have to re-encode it in real time like Plex does.

            • blase
            • 3 years ago

            I record Netflix all the time with the camera on my iPhone in 4K and I can confirm that it looks better.

            • havanu
            • 3 years ago

            You really have no idea what you’re talking about do you?
            Gear that typically handles only “2K” uncompressed in 4:4:4 is professional equipment that costs thousands and thousands of dollars. (The bandwith alone is staggering…)
            4K? Forget about it.
            All of the video that you have seen has been compressed. Most of it was probably an H264 or MPEG stream at 4:2:2 or 4:2:0.
            I can guarantee you, nothing has been 4:4:4.

    • maxxcool
    • 3 years ago

    Unless I work for the NSA, I really do not care for Read numbers.. give me random write. That’s what sells me on my SSD purchases.

    my 2c ..

      • demani
      • 3 years ago

      For me it’s the sequential numbers-video capture, transcoding and editing all work really smoothly with better codecs on a faster drives- and not needing a whole damn RAID is great.

        • maxxcool
        • 3 years ago

        Heck ya! For me I do tons of data ports πŸ˜› logs scraped from the server from endpoints to my workstation.

        Tiny..annoying..little..logs.. πŸ˜› ….lots of them /sigh/

          • Waco
          • 3 years ago

          Use a better filesystem…

        • Vaughn
        • 3 years ago

        The article says ganging.

        Wouldn’t this still just be an internal raid just having all the drives under one single case?

    • ronch
    • 3 years ago

    LIQID??!?!? WHAT KIND OF STUPID NAME IS THAT??!?!

    – Mad Dog Tannen (again)

      • maxxcool
      • 3 years ago

      LOL!

      • EndlessWaves
      • 3 years ago

      Clearly they’re having parity problems with the drive and lost a byte or two.

      • Vhalidictes
      • 3 years ago

      Who cares about the name? Can you say “mod it to install any M.2 drives you want”? Come on, say it with me…

        • Visigoth
        • 3 years ago

        That’s heavy!

        – Marty McFly

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This