Logitech G Pro mouse is beautifully basic

Logitech's G100 mouse came out three years ago with the initial launch of the company's gaming peripheral series, and its simple styling and reliable performance proved a hit with the e-sports crowd. The new G Pro mouse the company announced today draws inspiration from its ancestor, and as a result it has very little of the sharp angles and high gloss we see so often on gaming peripherals these days.

This mouse uses the 12,000-DPI PixArt PMW3366 sensor, beloved among hardcore mousing enthusiasts for its complete lack of prediction, acceleration, and smoothing. That sensor is also used in the G303 and G502, mice which have both earned accolades across the web. In fact, this mouse is functionally identical to the G303. Aside from the shared sensor, both mice have six programmable buttons. The single major difference is the G Pro's flattened, gentler shape versus the G303's sharper curvature.

The mouse is very lightweight at just 85 grams, which might help reduce arm fatigue during those long training sessions. It also has configurable RGB lighting for the logo on the back, in case you thought it wasn't really a gaming peripheral. Logitech is asking $69.99 for the new mouse, another thing it shares with the G303. It isn't available in stores yet, but you can pre-order it on Logitech's site.

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    • Major-Failure
    • 3 years ago

    Does it have the horrible rubber coating that comes off after a year of daily use?

      • TheLoneWolf
      • 3 years ago

      Roccat’s rubber coating is very good. My Kone Pure is getting on for 3 years old and has barely peeled.

    • NovusBogus
    • 3 years ago

    Mmm…this is the first Logitech peripheral in quite a while that I actually want. I approve.

    • Thin Man
    • 3 years ago

    Basic Huh. 6 buttons, program memory, RGB foolishness. However, to be fair, having seen and used some of the other overdeveloped and grossly overpriced “Gaming Peripherals” I guess it might qualify as basic. I’ve never paid more than $25-$30 for a mouse and, hopefully, will never have to. It’s like the difference between a weekend Cessna pilot and an Air Force Top Gun. You can switch their planes and the Ace will still beat the amateur every time.
    The difference is in the operators abilities far more than the equipment. Still I guess $70 for this is better than $150 for something named after a rodent…

    • Chrispy_
    • 3 years ago

    I was going to say that this looks just like my G303 without the silly lights, until I noticed the silly lights around the back.

    Still, if this had been around when I bought my G303 I probably would have picked it up instead.

    • Meadows
    • 3 years ago

    How is this mouse so [i<]basic[/i<]?

      • SomeOtherGeek
      • 3 years ago

      Yea, for 70 bucks, there better not be anything basic about it!

    • DataMeister
    • 3 years ago

    This looks like a nicely upgraded version of the G100s, which has been my favorite style for in-hand mouse feel for a while now. I never could get used to the non-symmetrical, contoured grip, style mice.

    Hopefully this will have more reliable switches than the G100s though. I have had two of them go bad after about 2 years. Unlike their super cheap B100-TAA style mice which have actually lasted closer to 3 years and only cost $10. Luckily the G100s comes with a 3 year warranty, so it wasn’t a complete waste.

      • NeoForever
      • 3 years ago

      Edit
      Wrong thread

    • geniekid
    • 3 years ago

    Looks like the G Pro is a version of the G303 that is targeted more towards palm-grip users, as the latter is more of a claw-grip type mouse.

    It’s very much a matter of personal taste, but having rotated between the FK1, Deathadder 2013, and G303 over several months, the G303 is my preferred mouse at the moment.

    • flip-mode
    • 3 years ago

    Finally a mouse that does not look like something from Transformers. I’d buy this mouse for $30.

    $70? GTFO. I’m not surprised though. Almost all mice are overpriced. All mice from Logitech are overpriced.

    Best mouse purchase ever: Amazon Basics wireless mouse. $11. It is just a tad small but other than that it is perfect. It does not have “pixart” sensor but somehow gets along swimmingly without it. It is a great mouse.

      • rahulahl
      • 3 years ago

      Does it do 1000Hz?

      • slowriot
      • 3 years ago

      All the power to you if your $11 mouse satisfies you.

      But I honestly do not understand freaking out over $70 for something that will be used nearly every day for multiple hours and should last at least 5 years. Freak out over the price of theater tickets or the prices people pay for something from Starbucks. $70 for a high quality tool is reasonable.

        • flip-mode
        • 3 years ago

        I understand it is different perspectives at play. I am firmly in the bang-for-buck camp. From my perspective, my $11 mouse is a high quality tool, which makes the $70 version absurd to me. Also losing the bang-for-buck battle are mechanical keyboards because of their ridiculous prices. People say “yeah, but they last forever”. I have a Dell dome switch keyboard that is now 9 years old and is just fantastic. I’m sure the tactile feedback is not quite the same as with a mechanical keyboard, but my value system can’t abide by ponying up another $50 to $100 additional for better tactile feedback when the keyboard I have is doing the job with aplomb.

        At the same time, the enthusiasts that will pay $70 for a mouse, $110 for a keyboard, and $650 for a video card will tear their hair out at the thought of the price of the Google Chromebook Pixel, which is a Macbook-quality device that will far outlast that $650 video card. I’d gladly buy the Chromebook Pixel if I needed such a device. I think it is a superb product. For some reason the fact that it runs Chrome OS makes a bunch of enthusiasts consider it a worthless device. It’s all perspective.

          • flip-mode
          • 3 years ago

          Downthumbs? Am I being an a-hole or does someone just not like opinions that disagree with their own?

            • slowriot
            • 3 years ago

            Have you used a high end mouse or mechanical keyboard for longer than an hour?

            • flip-mode
            • 3 years ago

            Are you answering my question with a question? May I presume it was your downthumb?

            • slowriot
            • 3 years ago

            Why not answer my question?

            Yes it was my downthumb. Because this “muh preferences” stuff is nonsense. You have to actually experience both sides to a reasonable degree to even have a preference. You seem to lack that experience if your inability to answer a simple question is any indication.

            • flip-mode
            • 3 years ago

            I don’t think you are entirely correct.
            Have you tried gay sex?
            Have you tried heroin?
            Have you tried Islam?

            Even if you have tried all of those, the point is WE ALL make decisions on things we have not tried out of necessity. We have to make such decisions because that’s how we decide to try something or not.

            So have I tried the $70 mouse? No. Do I need to try a $70 mouse to know that it is not worth MY money? No. I will find a mouse for much less that satisfies me just fine. Such is my $11 amazon basics mouse. I don’t need to try a Maserati to know that a Maserati is not the car for me. I know it is not for me based on price and price alone.

          • Voldenuit
          • 3 years ago

          For years I used a dell OEM mouse which (ostensibly) had a 1000 dpi sensor for gaming.

          When I started playing online multiplayer games, I found the mouse was no longer adequate for my uses*. Upgraded to a $49 roccat kova and it was objectively better than the dell, even at the reduced (1200 and 1600) dpi that I run it at for my game. I was practising my shooting accuracy on an online flash game daily, and my rate of improvement went up noticeably with the new mouse.

          [url<]https://imgur.com/THcOKCK[/url<] For single player gaming, I don't think the input device is as important; the shortcomings only became noticeable to me once I started playing online. * EDIT: Even with mouse acceleration turned off, the dell mouse was still inconsistent with fast flicks

          • NeoForever
          • 3 years ago

          I gave you a +1. I totally understand your bang for buck explanation. Even if I didn’t agree, it’s not a bad post.

          Here’s something for down thumbers. I tend to not support products that seem overpriced for what they are (judged based on older or similar models). If I would really like peacock feathers on my mouse, and only Logitech offers that for the price of $300, I ain’t buying that no matter how much it’s perceived value is based on hours of usage.

            • slowriot
            • 3 years ago

            Honestly this drives me nuts. flip-mode has provided no evidence he’s actually compared a high end perpherial to his low cost Amazon mouse. Further it completely throws out measurable object data that we have available when comparing mice.

            All he’s done is be loud about his low standards and dodged his chance to say he’s compared the choices.

            There’s an “bang for your buck” argument to be had but it must be based on actual experience or data. It can’t just be thrown out there as a defense from someone who seemingly hasn’t done any real comparison at all.

            I mean let’s be frank here. His $11 Amazon Basics wireless mouse is going to have latency that’s noticeable in desktop usage. Let alone any other tracking problems its sensor has. Do you really think this is the “bang for your buck” choice for anyone but those with the lowest of standards? The “bang for your buck” argument should be something along the lines of why get the G Pro when say a G303 or a Mionix Castor is cheaper and also high quality… But nope. We’re going to fight from the platform of an $11 wireless mouse.

            • flip-mode
            • 3 years ago

            Using your own argument against you:

            [quote<]His $11 Amazon Basics wireless mouse is going to have latency that's noticeable in desktop usage.[/quote<] You have not tried the mouse so you cannot make that determination. [quote<]Do you really think this is the "bang for your buck" choice for anyone but those with the lowest of standards?[/quote<] You are full of assumptions. You don't know what my standards are. I HAVE BOUGHT HIGHER PRICED MOUSES IN THE PAST. You are assuming to know a whole lot in order to prop up your preference as being something more than just that: a preference. And frankly, I feel like your preference is based on data that is not fully complete. You haven't tried my mouse.

        • modulusshift
        • 3 years ago

        I somewhat agree, but I’m concerned about the idea of these mice lasting 5 years. The Amazon reviews for the similar G303 aren’t very encouraging, else I would have bought one of those… If Logitech would stand up and offer a 5 or even 3 year warranty on one of these, I’d buy it full MSRP.

        edit: oh, I was looking at the G302, the Daedalus Prime, not the Apex. I wonder how much of a difference that makes.

        edit 2: apparently a pretty huge difference. Logitech is really selling itself short by even offering the Prime for only ten dollars less than the Apex on Amazon, the Apex has tons better reviews…

      • Redocbew
      • 3 years ago

      But does it play Cry…

      Oh, wait.

        • flip-mode
        • 3 years ago

        Yes indeed it will.

    • sweatshopking
    • 3 years ago

    This mouse looks nice, but 69$ usd is more than ill ever spend on a mouse.

      • RAGEPRO
      • 3 years ago

      While I think $70 USD is a fine price for a gaming mouse, I must admit that I think the reason the G100 was so popular with e-sports types is that it was a decent mouse and really, really cheap. 🙂 Logitech might have missed the point here.

        • slowriot
        • 3 years ago

        Huh? They have the G100s, the G303, etc, etc. They’re expanding the line up. Not replacing something.

          • RAGEPRO
          • 3 years ago

          I’m sorry? I didn’t mean to imply they were replacing something.

          The reason eSports have become popular is overwhelmingly that the largest eSports games are either free or very, very cheap, and they run on modest or even mediocre hardware. eSports are larger outside the US in places with lower median income and as a phenomenon I think the low price of entry is a big factor.

          All I’m saying is that the G100’s popularity in eSports probably had more to do with the fact that it was really cheap than anything else. If you look on the product page Logitech is clearly aiming this product at eSports players, but it’s $70, which as other commentors have opined, is pretty expensive for a mouse.

          As I said, I think the price is fair and justified, but it doesn’t match up with where Logitech is aiming it. That’s all I’m saying.

      • geniekid
      • 3 years ago

      The G303 is $40 on Amazon. I’m guessing if you wait a couple of months the G Pro will drop close to that price as well.

        • sweatshopking
        • 3 years ago

        I’m more of a 3$ for a used old dell optical at a garage sale kind of guy.

          • BIF
          • 3 years ago

          You get what you pay for in terms of Repetitive Movement Syndrome.

          The best mouse for me is Logitech’s trackball, although each of my computers also has a mouse-like pointing device as an alternate, so that I don’t fall into repetition.

            • sweatshopking
            • 3 years ago

            I don’t spend that much time on mine. Are you suggesting a mouse exists which doesn’t cause issues?

            • Voldenuit
            • 3 years ago

            There are vertical mice that keep the wrist in a more neutral position and don’t cause the user to exert pressure on the carpal tunnel. I can’t stand using them, but some people at work swear by them.

            [url<]https://www.amazon.com/Evoluent-VerticalMouse-Regular-Right-VM4R/dp/B00427TAIK[/url<] Numerous other ergonomic-orientated mice and input devices exist. But for gaming, it's hard to beat a good optical mouse with a good sensor and quality switches.

    • Duct Tape Dude
    • 3 years ago

    [quote<]PixArt PMW3366 sensor, beloved among hardcore mousing enthusiasts for its complete lack of prediction, acceleration, and smoothing[/quote<] I had a disagreement with a fellow gerbil a little while back about this: Do sensors themselves ever add acceleration? I was under the impression that a separate microprocessor made by the OEM (ie: Logitech) is responsible for tracking "enhancements" like acceleration/smoothing, and the sensor itself (made by PixArt) is solely responsible for only providing accurate Δx and Δy coordinates.

      • RAGEPRO
      • 3 years ago

      Everything is so tightly integrated these days that yes, the sensors themselves do run some code (non-upgradeable firmware) on their own little microcontrollers, and yes, some sensors do exhibit consistent performance — bad or good — across multiple mice from multiple vendors.

        • Voldenuit
        • 3 years ago

        Yep. You want your Pixart sensor and your Omron switches in a gaming mouse.

      • Platedslicer
      • 3 years ago

      I once watched an interview with a Logitech engineer, wherein he explained that “acceleration” is actually the tendency of a laser sensor to pick up imperfections on the tracking surface at low speeds, and ignoring them at higher speeds, with the result that cursor speed varies non-linearly with mouse speed. Optical sensors track over a wider area than laser sensors, so surface imperfections don’t affect them nearly as much at low speeds.

        • synthtel2
        • 3 years ago

        ^ Pretty much what this guy said. ^

        To a vanilla optical sensor, a given patch of surface looks pretty much the same regardless of which part of the camera’s FOV it’s occupying. To a laser sensor, the look of a patch of surface varies a lot as it moves across the sensor’s FOV. This means that laser sensors have to do a lot more guesswork when moving fast, and that tends to manifest as a bit of inconsistent negative acceleration.

          • Duct Tape Dude
          • 3 years ago

          Acceleration in the context of gaming mice is positive, where a faster mouse movement corresponds to an even faster cursor movement. You can test this by quickly moving your mouse in one direction and slowly moving it back. If the cursor ends in the direction you more quickly moved it, you have acceleration. It is typically applied after tracking corrections for skipping on surfaces.

            • synthtel2
            • 3 years ago

            That’s the kind of acceleration some people want and the kind that software implements. When sensors have problems, it can go either way (or both – inconsistency FTW), but it’s more often negative.

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