Aorus refreshes laptops with Pascal cards and 120Hz IPS screens

The recent release of mobile Pascal GPUs has given rise to a flood of laptop releases from all ends of the world. Aorus has thrown its chips in the pot, offering a choice of Pascal-powered laptops in sizes from 13.9" to 17.3". All the machines pack Nvidia GTX 10-series cards, Intel Core i7-6820HK CPUs slightly boosted with a 2.7GHz base clock, IPS screens, and M.2 NVMe SSDs.

Let's start with the big models first. The Aorus X7 DT v6 is a 17.3" machine sporting a mobile GTX 1080 graphics card. Display options on tap include a 2560×1440 IPS screen capable of 120Hz refresh rates, as well as a 3840×2160 IPS (presumably 60Hz) panel. Both screens offer Nvidia G-Sync support. Users can buy their machines with either 8GB or 16GB of RAM, and the four slots on tap should allow for further expansion.

Expandability doesn't end with RAM. The X7 DT v6 comes with a total of three M.2 slots, one already taken by an NVMe SSD. For those looking to fully trick out their machine, Aorus offers two interesting options: an M.2 capture card to help with game streaming, and an "Aorus Fusion keyboard" that offers per-key RGB-LED lighting. USB Type-A and Type-C ports, an HDMI 2.0 output, and a Killer DoubleShot Pro Ethernet and 802.11ac Wi-Fi combo adapter all round out the main package. Despite all the hardware, the machine is relatively svelte, with a weight of 7.1 lbs (3.2 Kg). It's also just  1" (25.4 mm) at its tallest point.

If the X7 DT's price tag is too dear, you can instead take a gander at the Aorus X7 v6. This model matches its bigger brother on most every point save for the move to a GTX 1070. Aorus offers an additional screen option on this model, too: a 1920×1080 IPS display with G-Sync support.

Chnces are you may prefer a 15.6" laptop instead, such as the Aorus X5 v6. This model offers pretty much the same specifications as the ones above it, save that the two G-Sync-infused screen options are a 1920×1080 120Hz IPS panel and an 2880×1620 IPS unit. This machine is predictably lighter and thinner than the bigger models, weighing in at 5.5 lbs (2.5 Kg) and with a thickness of 0.91" (23 mm.)

Last but my no means least, Aorus offers the 13.9" X3 Plus v6. The GPU on this machine drops down to a GTX 1060. There's a boon, however: the screen is an IGZO 3200×1800 IPS panel, which will likely have impressive sharpness given its relatively small diagonal. (We just hope it's not the same snail-like panel we experienced on the X3 Plus v5.)

The X3 Plus v6's smaller chassis leaves it with only two RAM slots, as well as two M.2 slots. The Aorus capture card or Fusion keyboard options aren't available in this model, while networking duties are handled by a Killer Ethernet LAN controller and an 802.11ac Wi-Fi controller. This mean little machine weights only 1.8 Kg.

Comments closed
    • Pwnstar
    • 4 years ago

    Why are there no prices?

      • wingless
      • 4 years ago

      These gaming laptops are like hyper cars. If you have to ask the price, it’s not for you.

        • ColeLT1
        • 4 years ago

        Some people with enough disposable income to get things like this, still like to shop around and compare prices.

    • Airmantharp
    • 4 years ago

    Now *this* is a gaming laptop. While I assume it’s fake-G-Sync (i.e. Nvidia FreeSync), it should still get the job done, at 1440p 120Hz on the 17″ model is great.

      • psuedonymous
      • 4 years ago

      ” fake-G-Sync (i.e. Nvidia FreeSync)”

      Lets not get things mixed up: On Desktop,, Freesync is merely AMD’s branding of their software side solution to output variable timed frames from their GPUs. The hardware interconnect technology they are using is DP Adaptive Sync (which existed prior to both solutions to handle mobile Panel Self Refresh). On the display panel controller side of things, ‘Freesync’ monitors are implementing garden variety DP Adaptive Sync (with the omission of active frame-doubling, so no Panel Self Refresh capability), while G-sync monitors are using the Nvidia panel controller (that does the frame-doubling panel-side rather than GPU side, as well as changing the LUT dependant on refresh delay, and ULMB mode).
      On the laptop side, the use of eDP rather than straight DP moves much of what would be panel logic over to the GPU side. The LUT sticks that can be done there could not be done on desktop due to the use of DP, and the inability to assume the presence of a certain model panel. While the differentiation in hardware is reduced/eliminated, the differentiation in capability remains. AMD have yet to demonstrate they can do the same panel-tuned variable LUT tricks that Nivida have, and on the desktop side they relied on pressuring monitor manufacturers to handle that.

        • JosiahBradley
        • 4 years ago

        Going to throw in the citation needed card. Nvidia can’t do all the extras with gsync without extra hardware as it isn’t in eDP spec or DP spec. So this is either real deal scaler level gsync or basic eDP with terrible advertising.

          • jihadjoe
          • 4 years ago

          That’s probably why they called it ‘Fake G-Sync’, i.e. Variable Refresh without all the G-Sync extras, or basic eDP as you called it.

          Just for context: Everything needed to implement Variable Refresh is already in eDP 1.3. Panel Self Refresh and variable VBLANK are the keywords here. It was implemented in order to save power, but the ability to do Variable Refresh came on board as a welcome side-effect.

          Back in CES 2014 AMD demonstrated variable refresh using standard Toshiba laptops without any hardware modification:
          [url<]http://www.anandtech.com/show/7641/amd-demonstrates-freesync-free-gsync-alternative-at-ces-2014[/url<] [quote<]Using two Toshiba Satellite Click notebooks purchased at retail, without any hardware modifications, AMD demonstrated variable refresh rate technology. According to AMD, there’s been a push to bring variable refresh rate display panels to mobile for a while now in hopes of reducing power consumption (refreshing a display before new content is available wastes power, sort of the same reason we have panel self refresh displays). There’s apparently already a VESA standard for controlling VBLANK intervals. The GPU’s display engine needs to support it, as do the panel and display hardware itself. If all of the components support this spec however, then you can get what appears to be the equivalent of G-Sync without any extra hardware.[/quote<] [url<]http://www.pcper.com/reviews/Graphics-Cards/AMD-Variable-Refresh-FreeSync-Could-Be-Alternative-NVIDIA-G-Sync[/url<] [quote<]All that is needed for this to work, as AMD explained it, was an eDP connection between the discrete GPU and the display, a controller for the screen that understands the variable refresh rate methods of eDP 1.0 specifications and an updated AMD driver to properly send it the signals.[/quote<]

            • jihadjoe
            • 4 years ago

            deleted

      • Krogoth
      • 4 years ago

      You mean Gsync 2.0? When Nvidia finally realizes that Gsync 1.0 becomes as still-born as their previous attempts to lock SLI support to their own chipsets?

        • Airmantharp
        • 4 years ago

        G-Sync isn’t stillborn- Nvidia’s release of the technology left AMD scrambling, and they’re still trying to catch up and match the full capability presented by G-Sync with their after the fact alternative in FreeSync.

        (while I’m fine with Nvidia locking AMD cards out of being able to use G-Sync, Nvidia should certainly enable the use of FreeSync with their cards and let consumers choose between performance and price)

          • jihadjoe
          • 4 years ago

          G-Sync definitely has some compelling features beyond Variable Refresh.

          The custom scaler they implement allows them a lot of timing-related tricks, to significant advantage.

          One is the GPU knows when the panel is updating, and when a new frame is coming. This prevents a new frame from being pushed to the panel while it’s in the middle of a refresh, and conversely also allows the panel to wait for that new frame instead of self-refreshing using the buffer if it will be ready soon enough.

          Second, since the panel knows when a new frame is coming, it can calculate proper overdrive values. I imagine this can eventually be extended to ULMB. If you know when a new frame is coming, then it should be possible to calculate a window where it’s ok to insert blank/black frames.

    • TwoEars
    • 4 years ago

    The 13.9 X3 Plus v6 looks nice but the that screen is much more resolution than I need in a 14-incher. Too many scaling problems, just give me a 1080p IPS display thanks.

      • Stochastic
      • 4 years ago

      For anything 17-inches or smaller I think 1080p or 1440p is optimal at this point in time. In a few more years once high-bandwidth memory becomes prevalent and we have super powerful GPUs 4K will be feasible, but right now it remains a pipe dream. The Devil’s advocate argument is that you can always downscale from a higher resolution, but you’ll still likely have to contend with a hit to battery life from having to power additional pixels.

        • iBend
        • 4 years ago

        they have options for that…
        [url<]http://www.aorus.com/Product/Spec/X7%20v6[/url<] 17inch FHD, QHD, and UHD (all support G-SYNC)

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