Gigabyte Pascal-infused gaming laptops keep it simple

The Pascal Laptop Day continues in full force. Gigabyte is showing off the improvements it made to four series of gaming-oriented laptops. The company has taken a more sensible approach than some of its competitors, offering machines that blend high-end spec sheets with a demure design—something that's refreshing after the recent spate of gaudy RGB-LED-lit, uh, everything.

Gigabyte's machines come in two types, with two sizes each. All models come fitted with IPS screens, backlit keyboards, Intel Core i7-6700HQ CPUs, M.2 PCIe SSDs, and all the usual trimmings—Type-A and Type-C USB ports, Gigabit Ethernet, and 802.11ac Wi-Fi. Users get the option of either 8GB or 16GB of RAM installed from factory.

Now for the individual models. The P57X v6 is a 17.3" machine packing either a mobile GTX 1070 or a GTX 1060 graphics card. The display is a 1920×1080 unit, and the keyboard offers anti-ghosting technology along with 30-key rollover. The optical drive bay can take in a Blu-ray or DVD-RW drive, or make room for extra mechnical or solid-state storage devices. The machine is reasonably nimble despite its size: 6.6 lbs (3Kg) of weight, and a thickness of 1.13" (28.6 mm.)

The P55W v6 is similar to the P57 above, but it's built on a 15.6" chassis. The graphics card is a mobile GTX 1060, powering one of two screen options: a 2880×1620 monitor or 1920×1080 IPS display. The keyboard on this laptop a little simpler, though: it lacks the anti-ghosting and rollover characteristics of the one on the P57X. This machine weighs in at 5.7 lbs (2.6 Kg) but is a little pudgy, from 1.1" (27 mm) to 1.34" (34 mm) at its tallest point.

And now for something a little different. Gigabyte claims that its P37 and P35 series are "thin and light," and the company may have a point here, as far as gaming laptops go. The P37X v6 is a 17.3" beastie with a mobile GTX 1070 and a choice of either a 3840×2160 or a 1920×1080 IPS screen. The laptop's backlit keyboard offers additional macro keys, too. Despite the size, the P37X tips the scales at 6 lbs (2.7kg) without an optical drive, and it's only 0.89" (22.5 mm) thick.

"Slim-and-powerful" can go slimmer still, as evidenced by the P35X v6. This machine is similar in pretty much everything as the P37X, except that its screen is 15.6" across. The display choices remain the same: 3840×2160 or 1920×1080 IPS screens. The P35X v6 is impressively svelte considering all the firepower inside: it weighs 5.1 lbs (2.3 Kg), and it's only 0.8" (20.9mm) thick.

Comments closed
    • cygnus1
    • 3 years ago

    Based on my experience with owning one, I don’t know that I would buy another Gigabyte laptop. It’s held up ok in that it still turns on, but it definitely has plenty of issues. Power delivery to the dGPU failed (failed cap on the main board) and so it must remain disabled in BIOS or the laptop hard locks. Lots of broken plastic tabs all over the place. Near impossible to find battery replacement making it basically not mobile anymore either.

    Even though their laptops tick all the right boxes at first glance, I will probably stick with brands that I can easily find parts for in the US.

    • End User
    • 3 years ago

    Nice to see Gigabyte keeping it real with a VGA port.

    • YukaKun
    • 3 years ago

    They look amazing. I am happily surprised.

    Will TR get one for testing? I’d love to see some numbers for them.

    Cheers!

    • Anovoca
    • 3 years ago

    I was really hoping they would do a Pascal refresh for AREO. I fear, though, that they are too new a line of products to get a refresh so soon.

    Oh well, not really in my budget at this moment any how.

    • Prion
    • 3 years ago

    Slap a nipple pointer on it and disable the touchpad and I’ll buy it tomorrow.

      • DPete27
      • 3 years ago

      …So…a Lenovo then?

        • Prion
        • 3 years ago

        More like, nipple pointers for everyone!

    • Pville_Piper
    • 3 years ago

    I’d be curious to see how much better 4K looks on a 17 inch screen… I wouldn’t think it would be much better than a 2K at that size.

      • dyrdak
      • 3 years ago

      it’s eye watering. trust me;)

        • Stochastic
        • 3 years ago

        I hope you don’t mean that literally.

      • Airmantharp
      • 3 years ago

      Actually find 1080p to be just about *perfect* for 17″, so as long as 4x scaling works well, should be great.

      • Chrispy_
      • 3 years ago

      Just sent off a 17″ 1080p screen to a happy customer and it looks really quite good. Not squinty small but crisp. 1080p on a 17.3″ laptop screen is exactly the same as 4K on an 34″ Television and very similar to these 23.5″ 1440p panels you can get now.

      It’s super crisp, so putting 4K on something that size is a huge waste of effort, not to mention a dpi-scaling nightmare.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 3 years ago

        4K is exactly the opposite of a scaling nightmare. 200% in Windows will put the 4K display at the same-sized elements matching 1080p with no scaling. If an app doesn’t support high-DPI, it’s still scaled and it’ll just look a little less crisp.

          • Chrispy_
          • 3 years ago

          I find that even on 200% scaling, stuff just looks weird and wrong, only magnified.

          You may not realise it, but a lot of raster content is antialiased for an RGB subpixel stripes. You blow it up to 200% and that means it’ll only look good on an RRBBGG subpixel arrangement.

          [i<]Hint: RRBBGG doesn't exists so your 200% scaled graphics look like poo.[/i<] The entire world has been creating content for 100% scaling since forever, it's going to take a looooooonnnnnnnggggg time for people to change everything.

            • derFunkenstein
            • 3 years ago

            You’re suffering from a placebo, but w/e.

            • Chrispy_
            • 3 years ago

            Uh, not a placebo.

            Throughout Windows and also in most applications, you’ll find text that has been subpixel-rendered to seem modern and rendered smoothly whilst not actually using ClearType.

            When you dpi-scale in windows, ClearType re-adjusts the text and performs fresh subpixel rendering for the correct scale, but everything that does not support ClearType doesn’t and looks wrong. Examples of this can be found in Windows utilities, management consoles, and of course pretty much everything from the top three application vendors on PC: Adobe, Autodesk and Valve.

            It isn’t just a problem for Windows, it affects Apple too.

      • tipoo
      • 3 years ago

      It’s better because it’s a scale of 1080p, 2×2 pixels become 4×4 pixels, sharper but the same size. With 2K (which isn’t really a standard but I assume you mean 1440p) there’s no perfect comfortable scale for size imo.

        • Pville_Piper
        • 3 years ago

        I can see the downsides of 1440p scaling… But I don’t see how you get much crisper imagers on a 17 inch screen… Might just have to see it in person to judge properly.

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