MSI shows off new motherboards and CPU coolers at Gamescom

We don't have any boots on the ground at Gamescom in Germany, but news regarding some of the products on display there has reached our ears regardless. MSI has a VR booth set up powered by the GTX 1080 Gaming X graphics card, but it's also showing off some new stuff. The company is premiering a pair of motherboards—including one for Socket AM3+—as well as its first CPU cooler.

The motherboards are both blacked-out beauties. The MSI 970A Gaming Pro Carbon has carbon-fiber-patterned accents on the heatsinks and the requisite Mystic Light RGB lighting. It's equipped with an ASMedia ASM1143 controller that provides four USB 3.0 ports and two USB 3.1 ports through Type-C and Type-A connectors. The new board also has an M.2 slot with four lanes of PCI Express 2.0 connectivity for transfer rates up to 20 Gbps. Aside from those rarely-seen-on-AMD features, the board is a pretty standard AMD 970 chipset motherboard, with support for four sticks of DDR3-2133 RAM and support for graphics cards in SLI or Crossfire.

The other motherboard MSI is revealing uses Intel's X99 chipset. The X99A-SLI is (somewhat ironically) an update of the older X99A-SLI Plus. It drops the older board's VIA USB controller for an additional ASMedia chip. It also trades up to Realtek's ALC1150 audio codec. Otherwise, like its predecessor, it has a pair of USB 3.1 ports, three-way SLI and Crossfire support, and 32 Gbps M.2 and U.2 connections. New to this board is ECC Registered memory support with a compatible CPU.

Last but not least, MSI is bringing its heatsink design expertise to the Core Frozr series of CPU coolers. Two models are coming: the Core Frozr L, and the Core Frozr XL. The primary difference seems to be that the Core Frozr XL will have a dual-fan configuration, as well as configurable RGB lighting. Both coolers are tower-style heatsinks designed for 120mm fans, with solid-copper baseplates mated to 8-mm heatpipes. MSI says the Core Frozrs will be available "later this year."

Comments closed
    • ronch
    • 3 years ago

    Is it possible Apple is paying Asus, Gigabyte and MSI to deliberately make their stuff look like this to make apple look classy?

      • chµck
      • 3 years ago

      but apple uses black PCBs too

    • Chrispy_
    • 3 years ago

    Wooo, chintzy vinyl carbon wrap has finally transitioned to motherboards.

    I’ll take three please.

    • NTMBK
    • 3 years ago

    Why on earth would you launch a high end AM3+ board [i<]now[/i<]? Surely the only people building an AM3+ system in 2016 are ones on a very tight budget?

      • BoilerGamer
      • 3 years ago

      970 isn’t a high end AM3+ chipset, all the high end AM3+ boards are on 990 chipset. This 970 board is an’t a high end AM3+ board.

        • NTMBK
        • 3 years ago

        It has random RGB bling, it has extra controllers to add USB 3, it has M.2, it has “premium audio components” which looks pretty complex… this isnt’ going to be a cheap board.

          • BoilerGamer
          • 3 years ago

          It is a decked out 970 board, doesn’t make it a high end AM3+ board as it doesn’t have 990 chipset. You would never call a decked out B150 board a “high end” LGA1151 board would you?

            • ronch
            • 3 years ago

            At this point I don’t think anyone can call 990FX high end either.

        • ronch
        • 3 years ago

        Yeah but why? Anyone who wants a low end PC could simply get an i3 now (or a low end Zen CPU next year) and have the option to upgrade later. Can’t do that on an AM3+ platform.

      • albundy
      • 3 years ago

      because, obsolescence is a virtue.

      • eofpi
      • 3 years ago

      Maybe they want AMD to move them to the head of the line for Zen’s chipsets?

    • Neutronbeam
    • 3 years ago

    The Core Frozrs…look cool. 😉

      • RAGEPRO
      • 3 years ago

      They do! I spent a bit looking around various heatsink OEM websites to see if MSI was just rebadging someone else’s work and it seems they aren’t, so their claim that they’re flexing their cooler-design muscle seems to hold water. A little bemused that they went with a baseplate instead of a heatpipe-direct-touch design though.

        • Voldenuit
        • 3 years ago

        [quote<] A little bemused that they went with a baseplate instead of a heatpipe-direct-touch design though.[/quote<] The Twin Frozr VI uses a baseplate, so I don't see that as out of character for msi.

          • Chrispy_
          • 3 years ago

          Baseplates reduce the heat transfer efficiency between the CPU and the heatpipes, sure, but flattening heatpipes also reduces their efficiency to some extent.

          The larger the diameter of the heatpipe, the less efficient it is when flattened. The extreme version of a flattened heatpipe is a vapor chamber and that requires lots of internal vanes and intermediary structures which adds cost and complexity in order to provide the effective behaviour of lots of smaller heatpipes.

          My gut feeling says that an 8mm heatpipe is big enough that using a baseplate to get more external contact area is at least at parity with flattening it to get more external contact area. I haven’t done (nor do I have any desire) to do the math on this though, and my lab days as an M.Eng student have taught me that even modelling these things isn’t that accurate, thanks to the chaotic behaviour of turbulent fluids.

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