MasterPulse Over-ear headset can be both open and closed

Along with the MasterMouse Pro L we covered yesterday, Cooler Master is also releasing a new headset: the MasterPulse Over-ear. Cooler Master already has a set of MasterPulse earbuds, but this new set of cans is an over-ear headset that uses a pair of 44-mm drivers.

The MasterPulse Over-ear has a unique feature that Cooler Master calls Bass FX. While we're used to cheesy bass boost EQ features on headphones, Bass FX is a pair of removable plastic panels on the sides of the headset. Installing the Bass FX panels closes off a mesh-like grating and turns the headphones from an open, bass-ported design into a closed design. Cooler Master says this configuration sacrifices some bass for a clearer, more balanced sound. Installing Bass FX should also reduce the amount of noise that both leaves and enters the headset.

Aside from Bass FX, the MasterPulse Over-ear has removable ear cups, a hidden microphone, and an in-line remote control. It uses a 3.5-mm combo jack that Cooler Master says should work with "most mobile devices." The company also includes an adapter to use the microphone with PCs. Cooler Master says this headset should be available now for $69.99.

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    • Voldenuit
    • 3 years ago

    Gaming headsets have a different set of objectives than audiophile headsets.

    I know it sounds like snake oil, but I recently bought a pair of siberia 350s, and the positional audio cues (even in 2.0 mode) are so much better than the (audiophile) senn 555s I was using before that I can now “spot” (with my ears) the location of ulting McCrees, Junkrats and D.Vas in Overwatch.

    I can even tell if the McCree is above or on the same level as my team, which is game-changing.

    • Voldenuit
    • 3 years ago

    Like taking the foam off the inside of a pair of Senn 555/585s.

    It was transformative.

    • Wildchild
    • 3 years ago

    [quote<] Installing the Bass FX panels closes off a mesh-like grating and turns the headphones from an open, bass-ported design into a closed design. Cooler Master says this configuration sacrifices some bass for a clearer, more balanced sound. Installing Bass FX should also reduce the amount of noise that both leaves and enters the headset.[/quote<] Open headphones are usually the ones that give a clearer and more precise sound if done right, but this is Cooler Master after all (there's a reason high-end, audiophile grade headphones are open). Then again I don't expect companies that don't specialize in audio equipment to really know what they're doing. Also - anything that emphasizes their advertisement for a certain audio product on bass is usually a red flag as well. It's the most overused and overrated of the frequency spectrum.

      • Waco
      • 3 years ago

      Yeah, I read this and my brain said “So they built something with stupid amount of bass, and resort to attenuating it by badly enclosing the rear of the driver”.

      Sigh.

      • RAGEPRO
      • 3 years ago

      I mean, you’re not wrong, but don’t forget that there’s a huge portion of listeners out there for whom the most important quality in a set of [speakers/headphones/etc] is the bass response. 🙂

      Audio performance is, after all, ultimately subjective, no matter how much we like to talk about impedance and RMS power and total harmonic distortion and frequency ranges and so on and so forth et cetera ad nauseam.

        • kamikaziechameleon
        • 3 years ago

        It’s also a great way to cover up lacking mid and highs where most sound that communicates meaning actually exists. Bass is a supplementary frequency that gives body to the meaning of the sound communicated at the higher frequencies over 80 hz.

        I love the feeling of bass as much as the next person, but no one communicates in bass frequencies. Bad mixing favoring that end of the spectrum DESTROYS the content of whatever your listening too.

        I’d argue its harder to get good high response than it is to get good bass response. High response window is much larger and the mixing more variable. And when its off nothing hurts your soul more than sharp mixing or flat renditions of higher frequencies.

          • Voldenuit
          • 3 years ago

          [quote<]I love the feeling of bass as much as the next person, but no one communicates in bass frequencies. [/quote<] Vin Diesel would like to have a word with you.

          • RAGEPRO
          • 3 years ago

          That’s an interesting point of view. You assert that music is about communication. I don’t think that’s necessarily the case. I think music can exist for its own sake.

          Even if we work within the schema of music-as-communication, though, there’s plenty of communication that can happen down in the 20-150Hz range. Sure, humans don’t really speak down in that range much, but most of the music I enjoy on a daily basis does not have vocals anyway.

          The pounding of bass drums in [url=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2OlAx4Dok38<]rock music[/url<], the evil growl of [url=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=skT226Du5YU&t=43m<]darkstep[/url<], or the groovy basslines of [url=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J0_hvxzjGx0<]classic funk music[/url<] can bring out strong emotions in the listener. How would you appreciate [url=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0CFuCYNx-1g<]Stevie Wonder[/url<] without a solid bass response? It's definitely true that it's harder to get a good high-end response than good bass response, but saying one is more important than the other sort of misses the point of the subjective nature of music and art in general. Even if we talk about favorable rendition of the music, it depends on the genre and even the track in question. I think that music which has richly detailed midrange and sharp, precise high tones takes a more developed taste to appreciate—a developed taste that most people simply don't have, and don't need to have. It's not a shame, or a bad thing. It's simply a matter of casual listening versus music enthusiasts. It's the same reason why you'll never hear [url=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qzZulX2GuVc<]Liquid Tension Experiment[/url<] on the radio. For that reason I do think that in the end, for a mass-market product, it's most important to have excellent bass response. Dull highs and muddy midtones won't please anyone, but regardless of how good your sound is, without that powerful bass response, it's going to miss the mark with most listeners.

            • Voldenuit
            • 3 years ago

            He said “sound that communicates meaning”, which in a gaming context, is not music, but situational awareness and positional queues.

            In a competitive fps, that could be an unseen (hehe) advantage, one you may not even know you were missing out on.

            Bass by its very nature is very poorly spatially sensed by humans (which is why it doesn’t matter where you put your subwoofer relative to your tweeters). So bass in a game is more for mood and atmosphere rather than “communicating” information to the player.

            • RAGEPRO
            • 3 years ago

            That’s fair enough. I really wasn’t thinking or working in a gaming context, though. 🙂

            • Voldenuit
            • 3 years ago

            Hehe. I misread your comment then. But I doubt Coolermaster will be positioning (heh) this product at audiophiles, so I think gaming is probably the most appropriate context to be evaluating this (and other gaming headset) product(s) in.

    • kamikaziechameleon
    • 3 years ago

    I’m interested to see how these stack up. Darn head phones with working quality mic’s are so flipping expensive these days. cost a GPU!

      • tanker27
      • 3 years ago

      here is your quality mic:

      [url<]https://www.amazon.com/Zalman-Zm-Mic1-Sensitivity-Headphone-Microphone/dp/B00029MTMQ[/url<] Add what ever cans you like.

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