FAA warns flyers not to use Note 7s on planes amid fire reports

There's bound to be slack time after every product recall announcement where some affected owners haven't heard about the issue, and Samsung's recent Galaxy Note 7 recall apparently hasn't caught everybody's attention just yet. One Galaxy Note 7 owner has blamed the phone for burning his Jeep to the ground after he left the device charging in its center console.

A Jeep SUV burns after a Galaxy Note 7 owner purportedly left his device charging inside. Source: Fox 13 News

That's not the end of the bad news for Samsung, however. The United States' Federal Aviation Administration has gone so far as to issue a statement that Note 7 owners should not "turn on or charge these devices on board aircraft." They also shouldn't "stow them in any checked baggage." Given this news, existing Galaxy Note 7 owners should probably seek to get their devices replaced as soon as possible.

If you're one of those affected by this recall, or if you were hoping to buy a Note 7 at some point, details are emerging about how safe Note 7s will be distinguished from unsafe units. Samsung's Australian arm has released details of how it'll mark devices that are free from the potential battery issue that touched off this conflagration in the first place. Safe devices will carry a black square and a large "S" sticker on the label.

The Australian division will also be establishing an IMEI database so that existing Note 7 owners or prospective buyers of used phones can see whether their devices are affected by the recall. Samsung has set up a dedicated website with details of the exchange program in the United States, as well, though it's unclear whether the labeling or online database available to Australian customers will be coming to the United States.

Comments closed
    • rbattle
    • 3 years ago

    This is the best use of conflagration in context that I have ever seen. Well done Jeff!

    • derFunkenstein
    • 3 years ago

    So a 6-year-old kid got burned by an exploding Galaxy S7:

    [url<]http://nypost.com/2016/09/11/recalled-samsung-phone-explodes-in-little-boys-hands/[/url<] How long is this going to be allowed to continue? This statement: [quote<]Samsung has been warning users of overheating and exploding batteries in the phone — and earlier Saturday urged owners to turn the devices off immediately and take them in for an exchange.[/quote<] HOW are they urging owners? It's very likely that "the latest news on phones" isn't something that the average Joe is going to keep track of.

      • Crackhead Johny
      • 3 years ago

      Ah the emotional appeal, for those who can’t care about another human unless you add emotional hooks.

      We all get to live like children when we listen to “Think of the children!” emotional appeals that get put out after logical appeals were found to be baseless.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 3 years ago

        The logical explanation that potentially exploding batteries are harmful to human beings has been found to be baseless. Got it.

      • just brew it!
      • 3 years ago

      It’s been all over the news for the past week or so. Even if you somehow missed it, someone you know is probably gonna say, “Hey didn’t you just get a new Galaxy Note 7 recently? When are you getting yours exchanged to fix that exploding battery thing?”

      A better approach would be for all of the carriers to push some sort of notification to all of their Note 7 users. Given that they know what devices their subscribers are using, it seems to me that they share some culpability if people are harmed or suffer property damage as a result of something the carrier could have warned them about.

      • albundy
      • 3 years ago

      and his grandmother says he’s now too scared to go near any other devices. smart kid. grab the golden parachute and retire before you even start working! hope he wins the lawsuit bigtime!

    • just brew it!
    • 3 years ago

    “Longer term, Samsung is a strong brand with great products. Most of them don’t explode.”

    (Says some stock analyst who was quoted by CNN: [url<]http://money.cnn.com/2016/09/12/technology/samsung-note-7-recall-battery-fires-stock/index.html[/url<]) 😀

    • Jigar
    • 3 years ago

    Its Banned on Indian flights as well.

    • ronch
    • 3 years ago

    This is a huge BLOW to Samsung’s mobile business.

    • trackerben
    • 3 years ago

    Hear this, Earthlings! You can’t use the Galaxy to get around Earth. Comply!

    • albundy
    • 3 years ago

    yay! huge losses and lawsuits on samsung for being stupid and ditching the option for a removable battery!

      • NeoForever
      • 3 years ago

      Interesting point. I wonder if Samsung is facepalming hard right now, thinking about how easy it would be to replace the phone battery if it was replaceable.

    • Krogoth
    • 3 years ago

    The prevalence of Lithium-Ion batteries make this debacle a foregone conclusion.

    Manufacturers like to cut corners as much as possible to save on the bottom line. Time and time again.

    • TheJack
    • 3 years ago

    I think TR should drop the voting system, as it encourages the rat mentality. That would allow for more constructive discussions.

      • Redundant
      • 3 years ago

      +1 No offense

        • TheJack
        • 3 years ago

        I take it back. Considering grand gerbils are the best members here!!!!

      • GrimDanfango
      • 3 years ago

      How would you define “rat mentality”? Not disagreeing, I’m genuinely interested.

        • TheJack
        • 3 years ago

        Sorry, I don’t think I can define rat mentality, but the founder of this website must have been a very committed person. Respect!

          • sweatshopking
          • 3 years ago

          Well, thank you. I do think of myself as committed. Scott and I both.

            • TheJack
            • 3 years ago

            Anytime!

      • tipoo
      • 3 years ago

      Eh, it’s not reddit where downvotes get you buried, the votes are nearly entirely cosmetic.

    • End User
    • 3 years ago

    The CEO of Samsung must hold a [url=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IorfYuF4gMM<]press conference[/url<] about this issue immediately to address the concerns of the public.

    • TheJack
    • 3 years ago

    This report is sort of short on details for a tech website. Why do some explode and what is the fix?

      • GrimDanfango
      • 3 years ago

      I suspect the reason they explode would be covered by non-disclosure agreements, while they concoct a public explanation that doesn’t leave them open to massive negligence lawsuits.
      The fix is variously to either not buy one, or send it back if you already have.

        • TheJack
        • 3 years ago

        Sweet reply, thanks for it. Just hope the fix is real and not like the TLC NAND fix, which fixed basically nothing!!

      • derFunkenstein
      • 3 years ago

      I was curious, too, but I can’t find the details anywhere online. That seems to imply that they’re not available. I can’t believe nobody wants to give a reason.

        • TheJack
        • 3 years ago

        True. Samsung is not giving away any details. But you would expect to get more digging or at least speculation in a reputable Tech website. There was nothing more to this report than what read or hear elsewhere.

        Oh bloody me. I just noticed the article was from the big boss personally. Hope he takes this with a smile.

          • derFunkenstein
          • 3 years ago

          I’m not a big fan of speculation, even when it’s couched properly, because people jut repeat it as if it was the truth and absolute fact.

            • TheJack
            • 3 years ago

            You mentioned one side of the coin. The other side is that we learn more about how these things work and so on. So maybe from time to time??

      • yogibbear
      • 3 years ago

      Chemical Reaction + Irregular Discharged / Charged Battery + Voltage Irregularities + Heat + Combustible Material + Oxygen = Fire.

        • TheJack
        • 3 years ago

        That’s a good start!

      • Crackhead Johny
      • 3 years ago

      I’m guessing the batteries were pushing safe energy density limits? Are these same batteries used in things that do not explode?

      The old Sony 18650s are very popular with vapers due to their ability to dump power fast. Something something exploding Sony laptops.

      I’m willing to bet if it is a pushing power limits on batteries issue, it will not be the last one we will see. It will be a “what new product blows up next?” for quiet a while as battery makes push limits.

    • danny e.
    • 3 years ago

    Someone likes attemtion and didnt want an old jeep, and possibly just committed insurance fraud

    • Ceremony
    • 3 years ago

    I know it will never happen, but maybe, maybe they’ll think twice next time, sealing those batteries in a flush one-piece casing using lots of glue. I hope the repair/replacing costs them a shitload of money. Just bring back replaceable batteries!

    • morphine
    • 3 years ago

    “FAA says Note 7 is too hot to fly”
    “Heat II (2016) – Starring Samsung Note 7”
    “The phablet from Hell”
    “Best Buy offering free extinguisher with every Note 7 purchase”
    “Samsung about to have a really hot fiscal quarter”
    “Sales of Note 7 in Northern Europe beating records”
    “Samsung reminds users that Note 7 is waterproof. Charging under water recommended”
    “South Korea infantry issued new SN7 fire grenades”

    Yes, unfortunately, I’ll be here all week.

      • Forge
      • 3 years ago

      Sir, I don’t care about your cell phone, you need to put the shampoo in the dumpster. It’s too large, it could be a bomb. No sir, we don’t care about the LiIon battery packs in your laptop either. Liquids in the trash can, now!

        • Firestarter
        • 3 years ago

        “oh this backpack full of batteries? Yeah my e-reader is acting up”

        I wonder how much watt-hours you need to short to crash an airliner

          • Ari Atari
          • 3 years ago

          Then in the aftermath of said crash, the FAA bans Lithium batteries.

          People were upset that they couldn’t use their phone on take off and landing; think of what it would be like if they couldn’t have them at all.

            • ozzuneoj
            • 3 years ago

            Removable batteries would certainly make a comeback.

      • Neutronbeam
      • 3 years ago

      Your comments have been Noted. If you persist in making additional comments we’ll have to fire your phone and alert security.

      • davidbowser
      • 3 years ago

      No Ma’am, I am not a liar. I just have a Note 7 in my pants.

    • derFunkenstein
    • 3 years ago

    You’re charging it wrong.

      • chµck
      • 3 years ago

      Charging in a car in the sun during the summer in Florida isn’t the best idea with any device.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 3 years ago

        Are you correcting me? We seem to agree. He’s charging it wrong.

          • GrimDanfango
          • 3 years ago

          Correction – he did indeed appear to be agreeing with you.

    • brucethemoose
    • 3 years ago

    Honestly, assuming the other divisions mirror Australia, Samsung is handling this about as well as they can.

    Still, never underestimate people’s ambivalence… They should push an update to affected Note 7 owners that encourages them to exchange their phone.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 3 years ago

      Yeah, if Samsung Australia can set up an IMEI database of which is good and which isn’t, then Samsung globally should be able to push an update to specific IMEIs, too.

        • thor84no
        • 3 years ago

        Or just push an update to all that checks the IMEI and notifies only based on that. There’s no real reason a one time check couldn’t just be in a normal update.

          • derFunkenstein
          • 3 years ago

          Well, whatever. My point was that Samsung should be able to alert affected owners.

    • YukaKun
    • 3 years ago

    Well, that sucks… So that means any Galaxy S7 user might have issues getting on planes due to this?

    If there weren’t enough annoyances to flight travel already, Samsung is now adding a new one /facepalm

    Cheers!

      • Platedslicer
      • 3 years ago

      Apparently it’s just the Note 7, not the S7.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 3 years ago

        I think his question is about whether confused FAA security checkers know the difference. They both have “Galaxy” and “7” in the names. “Oh, this is a Samsung Galaxy 7, you can’t fly with it!”

          • cygnus1
          • 3 years ago

          what is an FAA security checker?

            • derFunkenstein
            • 3 years ago

            TSA, my bad

            • cygnus1
            • 3 years ago

            😉

          • superjawes
          • 3 years ago

          In all honesty, the TSA would likely print off flyers with pictures of the problem devices.

          /buzzkill

            • NTMBK
            • 3 years ago

            So they will stop anyone with a buttonless glass rectangle, cool

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