U.S. Note 7 customers must wait patiently for replacements

Korean electronics giant Samsung plans to resume sales of its maligned Galaxy Note 7 phablet in its home country beginning on September 28, but American consumers must prepare to wait the better part of a month to get their presumably large hands on an updated hardware revision of the phone. American sales of the handset are not expected to begin again until October 21, according to leaked Samsung planning documents acquired by VentureBeat

The embargo on Note 7 sales affects prospective buyers as well as those who already spent the $860 Samsung commands for its large format flagship smartphone. Samsung recalled all 2.5 million Note 7 phones shipped worldwide due to lithium ion batteries that could overheat and catch on fire. According to the Los Angeles Times, 92 reports of Note 7-related battery fires have been reported in the United States alone. The Federal Aviation Administration asked passengers to leave their Note 7 phones at home rather than risk a fire inside an aircraft. 

Samsung has announced a software update that will limit Note 7 battery charging to only 60% of total capacity in order to reduce the risk of fire in phones not yet returned in the company's recall efforts. In the short time since the recall announcement, rumors swirled that Samsung could remotely deactivate phones of customers who chose not to participate in the recall. Samsung has since denied these rumors

Samsung launched the Note 7 in China on September 1, after reports of fires in other markets began to surface. Koh Dong-jin, president of Samsung's mobile division, said that Chinese sales would not be halted because Chinese market phones shipped with batteries produced by Amperex, while the phones implicated in fires in other markets were equipped with batteries from Samsung SDI. Two accounts of Note 7 fires have been reported in China; Samsung reports that its investigation of the first reported incident had no evidence of a battery problem. The company says it was not able to investigate the second report because it has not been able to gain access to the phone. 

Comments closed
    • Voldenuit
    • 4 years ago

    High density Li-Ion batteries are tricky to build, design and assemble.

    Boeing had issues with the 787, Apple and sony have had issues with their own phones, and several Teslas have caught fire after sustaining damage to their batteries.

    Not excusing Samsung over this, but this seems to be an issue that the tech industries are going to continue facing, until (presumably?) safer alternatives hit the market (graphite, solid electrolyte, polymer batteries etc).

      • trackerben
      • 4 years ago

      The MH370 incident may have been due to a bad shipment of Li-Ion batteries.
      [url<]http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2015/10/15/the-deadly-cargo-inside-mh370-how-exploding-batteries-explain-the-mystery.html[/url<] Recovered burned debris may be evidence of onboard fires. [url<]http://edition.cnn.com/2016/09/12/asia/mh370-fire-madagascar-blaine-gibson/[/url<]

      • Krogoth
      • 4 years ago

      Alkali metals in elemental form are dangerous to work with and tend to create very exothermic reactions.

    • Kougar
    • 4 years ago

    [quote<]...American consumers must prepare to wait the better part of a month to get their presumably large hands on an updated hardware revision of the phone. [/quote<] I'm sure Note 7 users appreciate the compliment regarding their equipment size. However you should probably reiterate about wearing protection.

    • neverthehero
    • 4 years ago

    Since , unless I’m mistaken, they didn’t produce those obtained documents, I’m inclined not to believe this report. There is nothing to suggest that the relaunch date won’t happen on this Wednesday as per Samsungs own website ” Exchange your current Galaxy Note7 device with a new Galaxy Note7 as approved by the CPSC available no later than September 21, 2016; or” I work at Verizon and according to everything that we have been told and customers themselves have been told, they can go into a store on the 21st and get one.

    • kamikaziechameleon
    • 4 years ago

    Its a darn sexy form factor of a phone… even if it has the stinking samsung overlay on android.

    • September
    • 4 years ago

    So if they are hoping to use Ocean Freight to ship those replacements there is this problem:

    [url<]http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2016-09-12/track-all-bankrupt-hanjins-ghost-ships-real-time[/url<] If they are going to use Air Freight then that will be quicker but cost more.

      • End User
      • 4 years ago

      Freight planes do fly out of Korea. My iPhone just flew out of Incheon. 🙂

    • torquer
    • 4 years ago

    Explosive news.

    I bet Samsung is really feeling the heat over this.

    Consumers must be charged up over that software update.

    No doubt someone is getting fired.

    Samsung’s forums must be blowing up right now.

      • morphine
      • 4 years ago

      You’re punny!

        • torquer
        • 4 years ago

        I should really be sent to the punitentiary

      • blastdoor
      • 4 years ago

      Given that explosively powerful battery, one might naively imagine that the Note must be blazingly fast.

      Alas… [url<]https://youtu.be/k_PK_6F_Bhk[/url<]

        • jihadjoe
        • 4 years ago

        Absolutely electric!

      • kamikaziechameleon
      • 4 years ago

      Thanks for twisting my funny bone Torquer.

      • albundy
      • 4 years ago

      my guess is the marketing screwed up royally by over promising and rushing engineering before any quality control was done. just a hunch.

      • ronch
      • 4 years ago

      You can bet Apple is bending over backwards to try and supply those Samsung customers with ‘alternatives’.

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