Syber C Series mini-PCs pack a serious gaming punch

The ever-dropping TDPs of CPUs and GPUs of all types have led to a veritable explosion of pint-sized computers packing serious hardware. These days it's easy to spec out a Mini-ITX machine containing all sorts of "desktop-class" hardware. Syber Gaming is making the most of recent CPU and graphics card releases and has refreshed its C Series lineup of console-like gaming PCs.

The C Series boxes are built on a Mini-ITX form factor that measures 16.5" x 5.1" x 13.4" (or 42 cm x 13 cm x 34 cm). Syber offers multiple configurations tailored to gamers' wallet specs. The Core 100 packs a Core i5-6400 CPU with 4 cores and a maximum clock speed of 3.3 GHz, 8GB of DDR4, and a GeForce GTX 1060 3GB graphics card.

Things get a little more enticing on the Pro 200 model, thanks to its Core i5-6600K CPU with 6MB of cache and turbo clocks up to 3.9 GHz, and a Radeon RX 480 8GB graphics card. The Pro 200 keeps the same 8GB of RAM as its younger brother, but its storage section contains a 120GB SSD accompanied by a 1TB HDD.

Syber C Series Extreme 400

Moving up range, business gets serious with the Elite 300. This beastie packs a Core i7-6700K CPU, 8GB of DDR4, and a GeForce GTX 1070 graphics card—characteristics that should firmly put it in the "high-end gaming" tier. For storage, the Elite 300 uses a 240GB SSD and a 2TB HDD.

Last but certainly not least, there's the Xtreme 400 grand-daddy. The machine's innards contain a Core i7-6800K Broadwell-E CPU with its mighty 6 physical cores with Hyper-threading and 3.6 GHz turbo speed, 16GB of RAM, and a GeForce GTX 1080. All that hardware should be sufficient for gaming at all but the craziest resolutions and detail settings. This model's storage compartments contain a 512GB SSD and a 3TB mechanical drive. The Xtreme 400 flagship offers other niceties, too, like dual Wi-Fi antennas and Thunderbolt 3 support.

Pricing starts at $795 for the base Core 100 model, while the Pro 200 will set you back $1,045. Moving to the upper range of the C Series lineup, the Elite 300 will sell for $1,369, and the top-notch Xtreme 400 ought to go for $1,955.

Comments closed
    • trek205
    • 3 years ago

    Lol 8 gb does not even cut it for a high end gaming PC. Enjoy your stuttering in games like Arkham Knight, Just Cause 3 and Mankind Divided.

    Edit: Well there appear to be at least two dumbfvcks here that down voted. You have to be a special kind of ignorant to think 8 gigs makes sense in a system with a 6700 k and GTX 1070. And I gave three examples of games that will run better with more than 8 gigs of system ram.

      • demani
      • 3 years ago

      It’s not the statement, it’s the attitude.

    • Andrew Lauritzen
    • 3 years ago

    It’s time to go to at least 16GB as the baseline folks. DDR4 is really inexpensive at the moment… 8GB no longer makes sense outside of extreme value systems.

      • Noinoi
      • 3 years ago

      This is likely heavily usage dependent. Most folks would probably still do just fine with 8. Heck, as heavy as I am with multitasking, I have noticed that I can get by with just a 4GB DDR3L stick in my desktop. (My usual RAM appeared to be getting unstable.) Albeit with a good chunk of paged out stuff if I go crazy with browser tabs, but still feels fine all things considered.

    • Raymond Page
    • 3 years ago

    tailorecorresponding, did we forget the strike-thru?

      • morphine
      • 3 years ago

      Doh.

    • spugm1r3
    • 3 years ago

    Odd, the price seems surprisingly reasonable.

      • Duct Tape Dude
      • 3 years ago

      Yeah, I was thinking $795 was the absolute cheapest without a GPU or something, but you actually get a GTX 1060 in there by default. For $50 [i<]less[/i<], you can get an RX 480. Very reasonable pricing for a custom order.

    • Platedslicer
    • 3 years ago

    [quote<]For storage, the Elite 300 uses a 240GB and a 2TB SSD[/quote<] 240GB SSD and a 2TB HDD?

      • morphine
      • 3 years ago

      Today is most definitely [i<]not[/i<] a good day. Thanks, fixed.

    • spiritwalker2222
    • 3 years ago

    how is this a mini PC. It’s almost the same size as my ATX case.

      • kmm
      • 3 years ago

      Your ATX case is around 18.6 L? Or are you just focusing on the longest dimension?

      • Spunjji
      • 3 years ago

      I really don’t think that’s true.

      • flip-mode
      • 3 years ago

      16.5″ x 5.1″ x 13.4″

      Compare to Corsair Carbide 200R = 16.90″ x 8.30″ x 19.60″

      Percentage wise, the Syber case is 97% x 61% x 68% of the size of the Carbide.

        • Spunjji
        • 3 years ago

        So roughly roughly 1,127 vs 2,750 cubic inches – or around 40% of the size.

      • EndlessWaves
      • 3 years ago

      It’s more of a 4 Gallon PC than a pint-sized one.

      And yeah, from the headline I was expecting another competitor to the likes of the Alienware Alpha and Zotac EN970, not something four times the size.

        • EndlessWaves
        • 3 years ago

        Plus with sloped sides this can’t be stood on end, so if you don’t have a shelf to fit it on then it’s a massive footprint, and it doesn’t appear to have been engineered to take a lot of weight on top of it.

          • Spunjji
          • 3 years ago

          True, but then everything about that design says “put me on a shelf”. I guess there are other options out there if that’s not possible 🙂

      • SomeOtherGeek
      • 3 years ago

      Mini-PC: Flatter than it is high…?

        • EndlessWaves
        • 3 years ago

        My definition of MiniPC would be anything smaller than Mini-ITX. So under 3-4L for a normal PC, under 7L for a gaming PC.

      • morphine
      • 3 years ago

      Look at them hardware specs. You can’t reasonably demand that it fits in your pocket 🙂

        • Shobai
        • 3 years ago

        I doubt that’s his contention. It seems he’s baulking at the “mini”, not the spec.

    • chuckula
    • 3 years ago

    [quote<]This beastie packs a Core i7-6700K Broadwell-E CPU [/quote<] Now THAT I would like to see! [spoiler<]I think you meant 6[s<]7[/s<][b<]8[/b<]00K there. Thank you Intel numbering conventions. [/spoiler<]

      • morphine
      • 3 years ago

      Ack, fixed, thanks.

      And yes, thanks Intel, for making the numbers really similar across different CPU families.

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