X2 Siryus case maintains a constant 45 degrees

The "Siryus" case from Dutch PC component vendor X2 will ensure the system inside is always at 45°—a 45-degree angle, that is. The case mounts the motherboard and components at an angle, leaving the rear I/O panel elevated and surrounded on either side by beefy-looking tubular aluminum handles. A large aluminum panel serves as a foot. Owners of nice furniture can relax, since the foot comes with a pair of rubber grips, too.

X2 may be courting AMD fans with the Siryus' provocative red, silver and black color scheme. The interior of the case sports numerous cable-management grommets. X2's says the case offers a pair of external 5.25" bays and six internal 3.5" bays, though we can only spot a pair of 3.5" internal drive sleds and no external bays in the manufacturer-supplied glamour shots. The PSU and a pair of 3.5" drive sleds are mounted within a basement that's shrouded on only one side. The case offers an additional pair of 2.5" mounts in the chassis' main area, too.

The front-upper (frupper?) panel is appointed with audio ports, a pair of USB 3.0 connectors, and a pair of oldie-but-goodie USB 2.0 ports. System cooling should be a breeze, as the Siryus offers mounting locations for as many as seven 120-mm fans or a pair of 360-mm radiators. The case can house ATX or E-ATX motherboards and graphics cards as long as 18.9" (480 mm).

European customers can order the enclosure directly from X2 on October 13 for 260€ (or $295). Customers in the rest of the world will need to contact X2 for purchasing info.

Comments closed
    • jihadjoe
    • 3 years ago

    Yawn. Wake me up when they make a case that rotates freely like a miniature ferris wheel, propelled by its own exhaust fans.

    • Anovoca
    • 3 years ago

    [quote<]Owners of nice furniture can relax, since the foot comes with a pair of rubber grips, too.[/quote<] Owners of nice furniture just threw up a little and moved onto the next article.

    • Rikki-Tikki-Tavi
    • 3 years ago

    This is a horrible, horrible design for anyone who wants to use a mechanical hard drive. You have to position everything with a rapidly spinning disk in it either horizontal or vertical. Spinning objects with bearing friction will try to right themselves into one of these two positions relative to gravity. The gyroscopic force will wreck the drives’ bearings. They should have arranged the hard drive bays vertically.

      • bronek
      • 3 years ago

      Nope, spinning objects do not “right themselves into either of two positions”. The effects of gyroscopic force are slightly different. Also, for the same reason horizontal position (i.e. spinning on vertical axis) might be preferred to vertical or any other really, but this does not seem to cause undue wear on drive bearings in all these instances were discs are installed vertically. I suggest you see [url<]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NeXIV-wMVUk[/url<]

        • Rikki-Tikki-Tavi
        • 3 years ago

        I happen to have an M.Sc. in mechanical engineering and I work in rocket turbomachinery.

        The unsymmetrical force from the bearings would lead to gyroscopic precession, which the bearings have to prevent, leading to an extra force on the bearings. If allowed free motion, the disks would right themselves due to dissipation of the precession (“It tries to right itself” may have been a bit of a lax way of expressing this). This may not actually harm the drives, because it all depends on he design of the bearings, but specifications of most major manufacturers say you have to install the drives at 90+-5 degrees.

          • farmpuma
          • 3 years ago

          Also not good for the head actuator bearings. Force will be applied to only a small area at the ends of each bearing with a forty-five degree orientation. One can expect a shorter life span for spinning rust.

          • bronek
          • 3 years ago

          Right, but I think that gyroscopic precession also applies to objects rotating around horizontal axis, for example any HDD in vertical position, no? In this case, this does not seem to do them any harm, which was my point.

    • Mr Bill
    • 3 years ago

    Its a 100% grade.

    • CScottG
    • 3 years ago

    I totally “fell” for that bit of click-bait.

    -B@sterds.. (lol.)

      • Ninjitsu
      • 3 years ago

      Interestingly I didn’t see the pun, and understood the title correctly. 😮

    • Chrispy_
    • 3 years ago

    [b<]TWENTY SIX KILOGRAMS. EMPTY.[/b<] Let me [i<]UnitedStates[/i<]ify that for y'all. [b<]FIFTY SEVEN POUNDS[/b<] IMO, that's too many heavys for an empty box. You could save weight by screwing standoffs into a block of granite, probably.

      • K-L-Waster
      • 3 years ago

      So the case all on its lonesome weighs as much as a typical 8 year old child.

      • Srsly_Bro
      • 3 years ago

      And I thought the CM Cosmos II was heavy.

      A benefit is that the thief won’t be able to steal it.

      A negative is the thief will sue you over a injuring his back while trying to steal it.

      • Anovoca
      • 3 years ago

      You’re worried about weight? Look how much space that thing takes up for the actual volume of capacity. So much lost with nothing gained.

    • toastie
    • 3 years ago

    I think I’d prefer it if the ports on the back side were on the side pointing down, rather than up. Sure, you have better access, but you’re going to get some serious cable stress if they’re running upward first, then towards the ground.

      • NTMBK
      • 3 years ago

      I think the idea is to improve airflow. Hot air rises towards the back panel, and hence out of the machine. Your version would create a hotspot at the top.

    • EndlessWaves
    • 3 years ago

    I think the metallic red thumbscrews holding the glass in place are the most tacky element.

    There are actually some nice design elements on there though. I like the rebar/screw legs and arms holding the main body are quite nice.

    I wonder if they removed the red box whether the remaining section of the case would be tall enough to take a Micro ATX or Mini-ITX motherboard? Those slits would make a stylish cable tidy or fan grille and the resulting trapezium-shaped case would be fairly striking.

    Although they’d have to ditch the silly sled.

    • TwoEars
    • 3 years ago

    Ah.. the dutch. A little odd, seldom boring.

    • WhatMeWorry
    • 3 years ago

    Why???

      • LostCat
      • 3 years ago

      As a novelty case it’d be funny, as a $300 case…no idea.

    • Srsly_Bro
    • 3 years ago

    I just want to lol at this even without considering the $295 price.

    • TwistedKestrel
    • 3 years ago

    [url<]https://youtu.be/AHtJ8yqwxGw?t=23s[/url<]

    • DrDominodog51
    • 3 years ago

    Stop it. Stop it now.

      • LostCat
      • 3 years ago

      Well it is the right angle, but it’d need a lot more red…

    • krazyredboy
    • 3 years ago

    Ooooooh… I see what you did there.

    • kurazarrh
    • 3 years ago

    Daaaaaaaad! Stahp!

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