Adata XPG SX8000 SSD has game libraries in mind

Adata announced today the SX8000, a new M.2 SSD in its XPG lineup of performance drives aimed at gamers looking for a fast storage solution. The SX8000 is a NVMe 1.2-certified drive based on a Silicon Motion SMI2260 controller coupled with 3D MLC NAND flash memory.

While a standard SATA SSD is still faster than rotating media can hope for, the NAND flash memory in that SSD is often faster than the connection itself can handle. The SX8000 uses the M.2 2280 form factor with a PCIe 3.0 x4 connection, making it capable of much faster read/write speeds than SATA. Adata says the SX8000 can do sequential read speeds up to 2400MB/s and write speeds up to 1000MB/s. Random 4K performance is rated at 100K IOPS for reads and 140K IOPS for writes.

According to Adata, the 3D NAND aboard the SX8000 should have a 2-million-hour MTBF, in comparison to regular 2D NAND's MTBF of 1.5 million hours. On the firmware side of things, the company touts the drive's "Intelligent SLC Caching" technology, which Adata says allows a portion of the MLC memory to act more like faster, more expensive SLC memory.

Adata says that a faster, heatsink-clad version of the SX8000 is coming in late October. Presumably the naked version of the drive will arrive beforehand. The SX8000 will be available in 128GB, 256GB, 512GB, and 1TB variants, all covered by a 5-year warranty.

Comments closed
    • ronch
    • 3 years ago

    Are these newfangled NVMe drives really noticeably faster than ancient SATA SSDs in real world use?

    • Jigar
    • 3 years ago

    I would rather purchase a normal SSD and faster RAM for better game loading and low FPS experience. Oh wait, i already did that. 😉

    • albundy
    • 3 years ago

    looks good to me! bring on the NVMe flood of drives! the more the merrier!

    • CuttinHobo
    • 3 years ago

    Advances in storage speed are always welcome, but man… For gaming, how do you justify the price premium of NVMe when the difference in game load times between the fastest and slowest SSDs are usually separated by tenths of a second? And to add further insult to the already-wounded wallet, the NVMe drives aren’t even necessarily leading the pack in those tests.

      • LostCat
      • 3 years ago

      I dunno man, I spent a lot more on my SSDs back in the day. I can justify a little extra if need be.

        • CuttinHobo
        • 3 years ago

        I can afford to pay extra as well, but I don’t see the value for gaming workloads. They have amazing specs on paper but completely intangible benefits for these load times. I haven’t been paying close enough attention to glean where the bottleneck moved once SSDs reached maturity.

          • Alistair
          • 3 years ago

          CPU it seems like.

          • Ninjitsu
          • 3 years ago

          Well, it depends on the game engine. Games that load first (or after a certain period) – you’d be right, and the bottleneck is mostly graphics.

          Then exist streaming engines like Arma which do benefit from having those random IOPS and high throughput of an SSD, reduces the stuttering. For Arma specifically, RAM seems to make a difference too. But the CPU is the real bottleneck, the game can never have enough, it seems.

            • CuttinHobo
            • 3 years ago

            I’d be very interested to see a review that illustrates the difference in load times across different CPUs. Got a link?

      • PrincipalSkinner
      • 3 years ago

      I’ve been wondering myself. 950 pro looks good, on paper. Real world tests show something different.

        • faramir
        • 3 years ago

        I’m happy with mine.

        I don’t have a comparison (SATA SSD) in this machine though so it’s difficult to say whether the ~50% premium over 850 Pro of same 512 GB capacity was justified. What is done is done though, I bought new machine that should last me many years and the price difference is insignificant on the grand scale of things.

      • Krogoth
      • 3 years ago

      Game load times have been CPU-limited since we moved onto SATA SSD media. M.2 Express SSDs only make sense if your workload involves moving GiBs worth of data on a daily basis.

        • CuttinHobo
        • 3 years ago

        For my own curiosity I’ve done a bit of googling to find a review that shows SSD load times with different CPUs, but I’m not having any luck.

        Do you have a link?

      • Airmantharp
      • 3 years ago

      *AND* why would you waste an NVMe slot on a game drive?

        • duke_sandman
        • 3 years ago

        I have 4 SATA M.2 slots in my laptop, but only one “normal” SATA. I love these cute little drives!

          • Airmantharp
          • 3 years ago

          That’s actually pretty cool; my comment was more for common DIY motherboards that typically include only one that can run at full speed (and maybe a second, which may be used for WiFi as well…).

      • Klimax
      • 3 years ago

      I Don’t even use SSD for games. Just have them on HDD and have enough RAM get there. (16GB of RAM is often enough)

        • Airmantharp
        • 3 years ago

        I install to an HDD, and move stuff over to an SSD if it could use a boost (usually whatever I’m playing at the time), and symlink to it.

        Certain games *cough* BF *cough* are very slow loading from spinners.

        • failquail
        • 3 years ago

        It does make a considerable difference for some games, where a SSD can dramatically reduce texture ‘pop-in’ compared to a HDD. (This is still the case with lots of RAM, 16/8GB for system/GPU here)

        But for the most part, a HDD is more than good enough for the majority of games. (something like 90% of my games are on a HDD, but i do have a cheap 128GB SSD to put games that benefit from it on)

          • Krogoth
          • 3 years ago

          SSDs do help in games that constantly load data mostly with sandbox-stuff by reducing “hic-ups”.

      • Kretschmer
      • 3 years ago

      I’d rather have 1TB of SATA SSD than 256GB or 500GB of PCIe SSD. Put ALL THE THINGS on my SSD, thanks.

      • funko
      • 3 years ago

      A lot of gamers, especially those that stream, multitask the CPU. they are recording at 1080p up to 4k, gaming anywhere from 720p-1440p, streaming on Twitch with live 720p+ webcam feed, chatting on Twitch, browsing multimedia between matches, playing/streaming music, etc. it’s not hard to bog down a SATA based SSD device these days. paying an extra $100-$200 for a boost in system responsiveness is chump change when picking out your primary storage.

        • CuttinHobo
        • 3 years ago

        I’m not convinced that array of activities would measurably bog down a SATA SSD, even if someone managed to do all of those things at the same time. Twitch’s max bitrate is 3,500kbps and should be a sequential write, and playing or streaming music would be far lower than that – even lossless.

        Is the Twitch stream being recorded locally at full quality? According to a doom9.org forum post, that’s 711MB/s for 4K at 60FPS. (12 bits per pixel x resolution x frames = 12 x 3840 x 2160 x 60 = 5,971,968,000 bps = 5,971,968 kbps = 711 MB/s ) A dedicated 1TB SSD will fill up pretty fast at that rate.

    • Srsly_Bro
    • 3 years ago

    Why did they stop at 8000? Do not want.

      • Generic
      • 3 years ago

      It’s a margin of safety.

      Electronics tend to break when one goes over 9,000.

        • Neutronbeam
        • 3 years ago

        Actually, things get wonky after you go above 11.

        • yogibbear
        • 3 years ago

        I don’t get out of bed unless it’s over 9,000!

      • floodo1
      • 3 years ago

      Well they are ISO 9001 so …

        • Chrispy_
        • 3 years ago

        Hnnnnnnnnnnngh!

    • DPete27
    • 3 years ago

    Yeah, I saw [url=http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820249086<]Plextor's M8Pe M.2 SSD[/url<] with a substantial heatsink when browsing newegg sales earlier this week. Let's hope this trend catches on. Nobody like thermal throttling.

      • Duct Tape Dude
      • 3 years ago

      2017: the year of SSD waterblocks?

        • CuttinHobo
        • 3 years ago

        Repurpose some of those screaming Delta fans in the ol’ parts closet.

        • morphine
        • 3 years ago

        You are joking.

        I don’t think you want to make that joke. That’s the kind of joke that will probably become real. 🙂

          • brucethemoose
          • 3 years ago

          Remember when video cards didn’t need waterblocks?

            • Waco
            • 3 years ago

            Pepperidge Farm remembers.

            • ozzuneoj
            • 3 years ago

            Or even heat sinks? [url<]https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/7/7e/STBVoodoo2SLIcards.jpg[/url<]

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