MSI 100-series BIOS updates show next-gen CPUs drop into LGA 1151

Today MSI announced that it's issuing BIOS updates for all of its Intel 100-series motherboards to add support for the company's next-gen CPUs. Leaks and rumors aside, this bit of news from MSI is the first official confirmation we've had that Intel's next-gen desktop chips will be using the same LGA 1151 socket as used by Skylake CPUs.

The rumor mill says Intel is preparing a new 200-series chipset to go with the launch of its next-generation CPUs, as well. Assuming that's true, it's possible that using a next-gen CPU on 100-series boards may cause builders to miss out on any of the new features in that platform, similar to the the way that builders using an Ivy Bridge CPU with a Z68 motherboard missed out on PCI Express 3.0 support. Nevertheless, a discounted 100-series board with support for the new CPUs could make for an economical way to get into a next-gen system.

So far, MSI is the only company trumpeting next-gen CPU support from the rooftops. A few firmware updates for Asus motherboards from the last week or so include line items like "CPU uCode update" and "Support new Intel CPUs" in their changelogs, though. We expect the other big motherboard vendors to follow along with similar updates shortly.

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    • Chrispy_
    • 3 years ago

    Kaby Meh…

    Seriously, what does Kaby Lake bring that Skylake doesn’t? The only reason to buy a Kaby Lake processor is because you can’t find a Skylake one cheaper. Every preview of Kaby that I’ve seen so far basically describes how it’s more profitable and optimised for Intel without compromising on the performance and efficiency of Skylake.

    Why should a consumer give a damn about Intel’s profit margin? When I buy a CPU I’m just looking for perf/$ and perf/W which seems to be practically unchanged with Kaby.

      • Bensam123
      • 3 years ago

      5% performance boost… Still waiting for zen and Intel doubling the amount of cores they have for consumer grade chips because of it.

      • faugusztin
      • 3 years ago

      HEVC 10-bit encode/decode.

        • Chrispy_
        • 3 years ago

        It’s not as if pre-Kaby CPU’s can’t do that too.

        It’s also amusingly irrelevant in the world of streamed content and actually streaming, since all the important sites and channels make sure they’re using the most compatible formats, not the latest or best.

        By the time HEVC 10-bit hardware blocks becomes mainstream we’ll be laughing at how old Kaby Lake was.

    • the
    • 3 years ago

    The real question is if CannonLake will be such a straight forward update. It too will use LGA 1151 on the desktop so there is hope.

    • DoomGuy64
    • 3 years ago

    AMD: Zen’s coming, and our boards always last multiple generations.

    Intel: We normally screw you over ever CPU, but can’t take the chance with Zen on the horizon, better issue an update for some of our motherboards. Anything older than Skylake still gets screwed. Hope nobody remembers that.

      • the
      • 3 years ago

      Intel has been using the socket same for two generations for awhile now.

      Nehalen + Westmere
      Sandy Bridge + Ivy Bridge
      Haswell + Broadwell

      The Sky Lake + Kaby Lake + Cannon Lake on LGA1151 is new but makes sense as Inte has dropped their aggressive tick tock plans.

        • DoomGuy64
        • 3 years ago

        Same socket, incompatible chipsets. Not exactly upgrade friendly. Older Haswell chipsets are not Broadwell compatible. They’re a one trick pony, which is quite disappointing to people not wanting to repurchase a whole platform just to get a slight CPU update.

          • Klimax
          • 3 years ago

          WRONG! Same socket and if BIOS is updated then same chipset. New chipset is needed if only new features are wanted.

          Bloody hell, how many wrong assertions can you stuff into so short post?

            • DoomGuy64
            • 3 years ago

            “New Features” Funny how AMD can make their chipsets last several CPU generations then. It’s more like Intel doesn’t care about leaving any backwards compatibility in their CPU’s.

            • Krogoth
            • 3 years ago

            8 series chipset in theory can support “Broadwell” chips provided that they got the “Devils Canyon” firmware.

            The only issue there is voltage differences between Haswell and Broadwell. The power circuitry on older 8 series motherboard may not work correctly with Broadwell despite being flashed by a firmware updates.

            It is a similar reason why older Socket 2011 board cannot operate Haswell-E chips despite the socket being physically compatible.

            • cygnus1
            • 3 years ago

            Yeah, voltages are a definitely an important detail for compatibility

      • travbrad
      • 3 years ago

      I’m not sure how much of a selling point that is anymore with how slowly CPU performance has been improving. When is the last time there was a meaningful upgrade on an “old” socket/chipset from Intel or AMD? Skylake to Kaby Lake will be a very small difference.

      Some of AMD’s “compatibility” has worked the wrong way too. AM3+ supported both Phenom II and Bulldozer, but virtually everyone who bought Phenom II bought it when AM3+ didn’t exist yet. So you could downgrade your new Bulldozer (AM3+) system to Phenom II, but you couldn’t upgrade your old Phenom II (AM3) system to Bulldozer.

        • DoomGuy64
        • 3 years ago

        Some of the older chipsets were still using ddr2, not to mention Bulldozer wasn’t a great upgrade. If you had one of those older boards, you probably started off on a slower cpu, and had the ability to upgrade to a 6 core Phenom II. AM4 isn’t exactly like AM3+ either, because the board is available well before the CPU.

        “the” mentioned intel has been using the same socket for a while. Nothing really major changed between Haswell and Broadwell, and yet you needed a whole new board for Broadwell. I don’t think it would have been difficult to make Broadwell compatible with older Haswell boards. Intel just likes to milk it’s users by making tiny changes that always seem to require buying a whole new rig.

        As a current i7 Haswell owner, and previous AMD user, I am really disgusted with these tactics in comparison with how AMD manages their CPUs/chipsets. AMD may not always be cutting edge, but at least I can trust the platform to last at least one upgrade. I was looking forward to a Broadwell chip, but instead I’m holding out for Zen. Maybe I’ll go Intel again, but their poor upgrade path only means I’ll upgrade less often, because I’m not buying a new board for every minor CPU revision.

          • Waco
          • 3 years ago

          You’ve already been told you’re wrong, why are you doubling down on the misinformation?

            • DoomGuy64
            • 3 years ago

            I’m in no way wrong. The Phenom II supported DDR2 and 3, and AM2-AM3+.

            Since when has Intel ever been that compatible? Never.

            I have a Haswell i7 system right now, so I know exactly how correct I am when I say Intel doesn’t care about compatible CPU upgrades. It SHOULD be eligible for a CPU upgrade, yet it isn’t because Intel left compatibility out of Broadwell.

            • Waco
            • 3 years ago

            It must be convenient to forget so many crucial details.

            Early Phenom II boards *AND* CPUs did not support DDR3. AMD only feels like the “good guy” here because they’ve been stuck on ancient AM3+ boards for nearly half a decade for the enthusiast desktop.

            Beyond that, your motherboard vendor is to blame for your Haswell system not supporting Broadwell. Many boards support both Haswell and Broadwell.

            So please, please, stop with the FUD. You’re wrong. Man up and admit it.

            • DoomGuy64
            • 3 years ago

            Nope. There is no such thing as a normal motherboard upgrading memory. What made AMD better is that the newer CPUs supported the old memory and motherboards. Intel doesn’t do that, so you have no argument.

            Intel does not support their old boards with new CPUs. Broadwell required a new board and new memory. There were no, and I mean no haswell boards that supported broadwell. What you are talking about are broadwell boards that support haswell. That is no way qualifies as being upgrade capable.

            • Waco
            • 3 years ago

            I don’t understand your willful ignorance.

            • DoomGuy64
            • 3 years ago

            You’re the retard claiming broadwell works on z87 on something. Broadwell required a broadwell motherboard, the z97. It was in no way compatible with the older haswell boards.

            That is 100% fact.

            AMDs phenoms fully supported am2, when they were an am3 CPU. They had full backwards compatibility with older boards.

            You need to do your homework buddy. GIYF.

            • Waco
            • 3 years ago

            You mean the AM3 boards that you couldn’t put early Phenom IIs in? The ones that didn’t have DDR3 memory controllers?

            It’s the same situation now, but you’re bitching about Haswell vs. Broadwell.

            • DoomGuy64
            • 3 years ago

            Uh, no. Total lie. You can put Phenom II’s in ANY am2-am3+ board. DDR2-DDR3. FULL SUPPORT.

            The only exception might be a board partner that didn’t issue a bios update. You’re such a liar that it’s ridiculous. Pulling imaginary stuff out of your behind.

            Bulldozer is the CPU that doesn’t work on DDR2 boards, and for good reason. DDR2 was years too outdated at that point to bother with.

            You straight up don’t know what you’re talking about. z87 doesn’t support Broadwell. FACT. Phenom 2’s run on DDR2 boards. FACT. You’re just spouting off nonsense trying to piggyback on the intel fanboy-wagon. Too bad the facts don’t jive with your fanboyism. Boo Hoo. Call the wahbulance or something, and don’t get back to me until you have your facts straight.

            • Waco
            • 3 years ago

            There are multiple Phenom IIs that don’t have DDR3 controllers.

            Z97 boards were available long before Broadwell launched (just like AM3+ boards and bulldozer).

            Yell louder though, it’s working for you. The fact that you’re pulling the fanboy card is hilarious.

            • DoomGuy64
            • 3 years ago

            LIES. I had a 1090T in a DDR2 board before I upgraded to haswell. You’re a complete liar and have not backed up any of your nonsense claims with a reference.

            Good luck finding a reference for your lies that you pulled out of thin air.

            • Waco
            • 3 years ago

            You have a very short memory. Early Phenom IIs COULD NOT run in DDR3 boards with the AM3 chipset, they were AM2+ only.

            I mean, you can keep misreading things if you want to, but you can’t change history.

            • DoomGuy64
            • 3 years ago

            LOL, That’s the OPPOSITE of what you were claiming. and those were OLD CPUs made BEFORE AMD released AM3.

            You’re so full of crap it’s not funny. We are SPECIFICALLY talking about UPGRADES.

            AM3 PHENOM 2’S WORKED IN AM2 BOARDS.

            Putting an AM2 CPU in an AM3 board does NOT count as an UPGRADE. SO FREAKING RETARDED.

            • Waco
            • 3 years ago

            Funny, I was talking about putting newer CPUs in boards available before the launch of said CPU. AMD sold AM2+, AM3, and AM3+ prior to any new CPUs being available (like Intel with Z97 boards).

            Perhaps you should just read more carefully. Also, AM3 Phenom 2s did not work in AM2 boards, they worked only in AM2+ boards.

            • DoomGuy64
            • 3 years ago

            [url<]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v1PBptSDIh8[/url<]

            • Waco
            • 3 years ago

            It hurts you to be wrong doesn’t it? You’ll get used to it.

            • DoomGuy64
            • 3 years ago

            We’re talking about upgrades, and you’re using downgrading as an argument. STFU retard.

            • Waco
            • 3 years ago

            I wasn’t, no, but keep claiming that if you want.

            If you can’t see the parallels here between AMD and Intel you are the one being a fanboy.

            • DoomGuy64
            • 3 years ago

            I QUOTE: [quote<]You mean the AM3 boards that you couldn't put early Phenom IIs in? The ones that didn't have DDR3 memory controllers?[/quote<] You're specifically using DOWNGRADING as your argument. GTFO. Putting a 6 core Phenom II in a DDR2 board is an upgrade. You don't put an old DDR2 phenom II in a new DDR3 board. That's RETARDED, and not an argument. If you were going to buy a new AM3 board, you obviously would pairing it with the matching CPU. YOUR ARGUMENT IS THE SAME AS COMPLAINING WHY A CORE DUO DOESN'T WORK IN A SKYLAKE BOARD. Anyone who buys a new board, buys the matching CPU, and does not pair it with a last gen CPU. My argument, which you have NOT addressed, is that Broadwell did not include backwards compatibility for z87, while AMD provided backwards compatibility for AM2+, which is MUCH WIDER SUPPORT than z87 was to z97.

            • Waco
            • 3 years ago

            Your timing is all wrong and you’re just ignoring it.

            Boards that supported Broadwell launched well before Broadwell. You can put a Haswell or Broadwell CPU in them.

            Boards that supported the Bulldozer launched well before Bulldozer. You can put Phenom II or Bulldozer CPUs in them.

            I don’t see why you think there’s any difference here.

            • DoomGuy64
            • 3 years ago

            Yeah, just keep repeating the stupid downgrade argument, and ignoring that Intel doesn’t support UPGRADES.

            • Waco
            • 3 years ago

            I specifically didn’t mention anything about downgrading in that last post, so please, continue to yell with your fingers in your ears.

            • DoomGuy64
            • 3 years ago

            You’re the one ignoring UPGRADES, and NEVER ONCE have you addressed the point, and instead made excuses.

            I don’t care that new boards support new CPU’s. THAT’S NOT THE FREAKING POINT.

            The point is that AMD’S OLD BOARDS SUPPORT NEW CPU’S, AND INTEL DOES NOT.

            • Waco
            • 3 years ago

            No, they really don’t (in general). One generation did. Yay?

        • Bensam123
        • 3 years ago

        Wouldn’t it be more of a selling point considering how little CPUs change? More incentive to upgrade as you aren’t replacing the whole system.

        Going from PCIE v3 to v4 isn’t a big deal… Chipset upgrades haven’t been a big deal since they switched to PCIE. Even upgrading to newer memory (like DDR4) has little to no merit outside of niche case scenarios. There isn’t anything to write home about or base a system around when it comes to chipsets. However chopping a extra $100 off a upgrade…

        Compatibility goes both directions. I’ve bought newer AM3+ motherboards and used older generation chips in them… specifically budget chips. It’s not always about getting the ‘fastest’ of anything.

      • maxxcool
      • 3 years ago

      Intel : We don’t need to make chipsets compatible. A single cpu/chipsets performance advantage lasts for the lifespan of AMD sockets.

    • chuckula
    • 3 years ago

    [quote<]Leaks and rumors aside, this bit of news from MSI is the first official confirmation we've had that the Kaby Lake desktop chips will be using the same LGA 1151 socket as used by Skylake CPUs.[/quote<] Actually, the socket LGA-1151 compatibility isn't the news here. It's the confirmation that existing Z170 motherboards will actually work with Kaby Lake that was still somewhat uncertain. So it looks like any Z170 owner will be able to upgrade to Kaby Lake and the Z270 motherboards will be nice-but-no-necessary for Kaby Lake.

      • danazar
      • 3 years ago

      Well, not any Z170 owner. Just those with motherboards that get a BIOS update…

      High-end motherboard manufacturers tend to be pretty good with the BIOS updates, but it’s not guaranteed for anyone until new firmware for their board is released.

      Edited to add: It’s also possible some early Z170 boards won’t support Kaby Lake due to voltage tolerances or some other board design issue they didn’t see coming. This always seems to happen with at least a few boards out there.

        • chuckula
        • 3 years ago

        [quote<]Well, not any Z170 owner. Just those with motherboards that get a BIOS update... [/quote<] You can make that argument for any motherboard that's produced with firmware prior to the launch of a newer processor though. Maybe a cheap OEM system that wasn't really intended to be upgraded by the user won't have a firmware update but I'd be hard pressed to think of a Z170 board sold directly to the retail channel that won't get a simple firmware update for the new chips.

      • jihadjoe
      • 3 years ago

      What sort of stuff would prevent compatibility? I can’t remember the last time a motherboard with a technically compatible chipset couldn’t take in a new CPU, but I’m pretty sure it was down to the power section of old boards not being compatible with the newer stuff.

      Must’ve been like 440BX era i guess. Late gen 1.3GHz+ Tualatins would’ve been technically compatible being from the same architecture as the very first Pentium IIIs, but having gone through several die shrinks old boards can’t deliver a low enough voltage to not fry the newer chips…

        • chuckula
        • 3 years ago

        I’m not saying that it’s a surprise for Kaby Lake to work with Z170 boards. In fact, it was expected for them to work and there’s even a chance (not guaranteed) that the consumer-grade Cannon Lake parts will work with Z170 boards too.

        But there’s expectations and facts. You never [b<]really[/b<] know until the firmware comes out and you have confirmation.

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