EVGA gives free PowerLinks to owners of its GTX 10-series cards

When we build PCs, we have just one goal in mind. No, not "build a working, powerful PC." The most important goal, of course, is hiding all the cables. To help solve that problem, EVGA announced this week that it will be giving away its PowerLink adapter to owners of its GeForce GTX 10-series cards who register their products through the company's website. That means both new owners and folks who bought their cards a while back can get in on the deal—at least, so long as EVGA has stock.

The PowerLink is a power adapter made with cable management in mind, designed to let you move the 6 and 8-pin power connectors that normally plug into the side of your graphics card onto the front of the card where they'll be more difficult to see. EVGA claims the PowerLink promotes better airflow, and it also says some capacitors inside provide a degree of power filtering. These claims are going to be tougher to back up than the immediately obvious aesthetic enhancement the device provides by hiding some of the most troublesome cables in a case.

The spacing between the connectors on this adapter can be adjusted with a screwdriver, too, meaning the PowerLink should be compatible with a wide variety of cards and likely won't have to be discarded during an upgrade.

As we noted at the beginning of this piece, the best part about this deal is that it's retroactive. If you already have an EVGA 10-series graphics card in your rig, you're likely eligible. All EVGA is asking of anyone who owns or purchases one of its GeForce GTX 10-series cards is that they register an EVGA account, link a card with it, and pay the cost of shipping and handling for the adapter. The PowerLink isn't available at retail yet, but it's expected to go for around $30 when it is.

Comments closed
    • Srsly_Bro
    • 4 years ago

    Evga Jacob on overclock.net said the US shipping will be $9.99. I’ll find the post and include it for clarification whether it’s lower 48 for that price.

    • christos_thski
    • 4 years ago

    We’ve certainly gone a long way from the older bizzaro upside-down 6 pin connectors which unaccountably clipped on the “inside of the card” (making it a struggle to fit a finger/screwdriver/plate inside in order to unplug the thing).

    Remember those? It wasn’t so long ago, both my 6870 and 7870 (as well as Geforce cards from the same generation, iirc) had them. Could someone explain this setup that defied all logic, ergonomics, and common sense? I curse and spit everytime I’ve got to unplug such cards…

    Anyway, as far as EVGA’s thingy is concerned, maybe they should stock it standard with their cards and see sales increase.

    • Chrispy_
    • 4 years ago

    The shortage of good quality right-angle PCIe 6-pin and 8-pin adapters is quite troubling.

    The only thing on the market really is some stuff on ebay that’s clearly homemade.

    • torquer
    • 4 years ago

    Cool idea, great that its free, but hot damn that thing is UGLY

      • Chrispy_
      • 4 years ago

      …and devoid of pulsating, software-controlled RGB lights. It doesn’t even have enough buttons or DPI.

      NO SALE.

        • torquer
        • 4 years ago

        Its bulky and ugly, regardless of the blinkenlights it doesn’t have 🙂

    • BillyBuerger
    • 4 years ago

    This is a nice idea. But why hasn’t anyone put the power connectors lower down on the card in the first place?

      • xeridea
      • 4 years ago

      My thoughts to. The Sapphire Nitro cards have them on the front, it helps a lot. And it looks a lot better than putting this giant thing on top. So basically they are offering to give/sell you a thing that puts them on the side where they should just put them anyway. Kind of pointless, unless the capacitors help, but those could also just be put on card.

      • colinstu12
      • 4 years ago

      +1. Was going to comment the exact same thing. I’ve been wondering that for years.

      • Ninjitsu
      • 4 years ago

      My GTX 560 had connectors facing the drive cage, way easier to plug in than ones facing the side panel.

      • Chrispy_
      • 4 years ago

      This has been my pet peeve for graphics cards since building my HTPC into a low-profile case that accepts full-height cards.

      It has enough room for an graphics card that does NOT violate the ATX expansion card spec, but cards with connectors coming out of the top are common, as are cards that extend upwards (further out from the PCIe slot).

      • krazyredboy
      • 4 years ago

      My assumption would be card length. When you have the connectors off of the back of the card, you effectively lengthen the card via the plugs. This hampers your ability to fit these card into certain cases, due to drive location, cage frame, etc. I ran into this issue with an old pc of mine, where I need to cut a portion of the drive carrier, in order to fit my video card and molex plug into place.

      This sort of protects the manufacturer against angst, when they claim their card should fit into certain size cases, but neglect to mention that you’ll need that extra inch or so to allow for the connection of power.

    • SomeOtherGeek
    • 4 years ago

    TAKE MY MONEY!! ME WANT NOW!

    Anyway, everyone should have this option for their cards. This is an awesome idea and EVGA should my one generic enough that anybody can buy one. Sounds like a good marketing thing to me…

    • llisandro
    • 4 years ago

    I’ve always wanted something like this for the 24-pin ATX power connector! With modern cable mgmt, seems it would be an easier angle than turning the full 180. Has anyyone ever seen something like this? I looked a while ago and my conclusion was I’d probably have to make my own.

    I guess it makes sense that I’ve only seen EVGA mobos with an ATX power connector parallel to the board- seems like somebody is thinking about this.

      • xeridea
      • 4 years ago

      Also a new standard connector would be nice. Many of the 24 pins are unused, most things just run through VRMs using 12v. Some of the voltages supplied by PSU are for legacy things.

      • Freon
      • 4 years ago

      If you work the cables a bit you can probably get them to bend pretty tightly. Maybe get a spare ATX extension cable, work it a bit by hand before install and epoxy it once you have it bent like you like.

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